Aug 09, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions/Official Course Syllabi


  

 

English

  
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    ENGL 2510 - British Literature to 1760

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    This course begins with a study of the literature from the Medieval period and moves to study works written throughout the age of Chivalry, the Elizabethan era, the Seventeenth century political upheaval and Restoration, and the Age of Enlightenment in the Eighteenth Century. Authors that may be covered include Chaucer, Mallory, More, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Raleigh, Donne, Herrick, Marvell, Milton, Dryden, Swift, and Pope.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate an understanding of text and sub‐text of early British literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the text of Early British Literature.
    2. Analyze the text of Early British Literature (breaks an idea into component parts and describes the relationships).
    3. Synthesize the text of Early British Literature (puts the parts together to form a new whole).

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of the core elements that define early British literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the core elements that define Early British Literature.
    2. Interpret/illustrate one or more core elements (theme, tone, plot, mystery play, ballads, lyrics, poetry, etc.).
    3. Analyze/distinguish between the core elements that define Early British Literature.
    4. Synthesize, in a research paper, the core elements that define Early British Literature.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate knowledge of the interaction between British history and literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the historical setting of Early British Literature.
    2. Locate the author as a product of the historical setting/environment.
    3. Analyze, by explaining the relationship between Early British Literature and the social, economic, and political forces of the time period.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to conduct research on an aspect of early British literature and write a paper based upon that research.

    Objectives:

    1. Create a bibliography in a standard format.
    2. Evaluate the sources and the data.
    3. Analyze an aspect of Early British Literature.
    4. Synthesize the results of research and analysis of Early British Literature.
    5. Cite, parenthetically and on the works cited page, the sources used (MLA Style).

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to think critically.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the premises, conclusions, and reasoning used to justify claims.
    2. Evaluate the validity and soundness of arguments, based on qualitative and quantitative information, in order to accept, challenge or defend claims or findings.
    3. Draw conclusions about how information can be used.
    4. Evaluate the processes used in assessing hypotheses.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Roots of British Literature
      1. Introduction to British Literature/Language/History
      2. “The Dream of the Rood”
      3. Beowulf
      4. “The Wanderer”
    2. Middle British Literature
      1. Geoffrey Chaucer
      2. Middle English Lyrics
      3. Mystery Plays
      4. Popular Ballads
    3. Sixteenth Century
      1. Sir Thomas More
      2. Thomas Wyatt the Elder
      3. Philip Sidney
      4. Christopher Marlowe
      5. William Shakespeare
      6. Sir Walter Raleigh
      7. Thomas Campion
    4. Early Seventeenth Century
      1. John Donne
      2. Ben Jonson
      3. Robert Herrick
      4. George Herbert
      5. Andrew Marvell
      6. John Milton
      7. Lady Mary Wroth
    5. Restoration and Enlightenment
      1. John Dryden
      2. Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
      3. Jonathon Swift
      4. Alexander Pope
      5. Thomas Gray
      6. Christopher Smart

    Primary Faculty
    McGee, Nancy
    Secondary Faculty
    Ragan, Mary
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2520 - British Literature From 1760 to Present

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190  

    This course carries on the study of British Literature from the Pre-Romantics through the modernist period and into the present day. Authors who may be covered in this course include Blake, Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Byron, Shelley(s), Dickens, Browning(s), Tennyson, Arnold, Rossetti, Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Joyce, Eliot, Lawrence, Thomas, and Heaney.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the text and sub‐text of later British literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the text of later British literature.
    2. Analyze the text of later British literature.
    3. Synthesize the text of later British literature.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the core elements that define later British literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the core elements that define later British literature.
    2. Interpret/illustrate one or more core elements, such as theme, tone, plot, play, ballads, lyrics, poetry, character, narrator, etc.
    3. Analyze/distinguish between the core elements that define later British literature.
    4. Synthesize, in a research paper, the core elements that define later British literature.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the interaction between British history and its literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the historical setting of later British literature.
    2. Locate the author as a product of the historical setting/environment.
    3. Analyze, by explaining the relationship between later British literature and the social, economic, and political forces of the time period.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to conduct research on an aspect of later British literature and write a paper in standard format based upon that research.

    Objectives:

    1. Create a bibliography in a standard format.
    2. Evaluate the sources and the data.
    3. Analyze an aspect of later British literature.
    4. Synthesize the results of research and analysis of later British literature.
    5. Cite, parenthetically and on the works cited page, the sources used in a standard format.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to think critically.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the premises, conclusions, and reasoning used to justify claims.
    2. Evaluate the validity and soundness of arguments, based on qualitative and quantitative information, in order to accept, challenge or defend claims or findings.
    3. Draw conclusions about how information can be used.
    4. Evaluate the processes used in assessing hypotheses.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Select 1 or more authors from each era listed below:

    1. Pre‐Romantics
      1. Introduction to British Romanticism/History
      2. Christopher Smart
      3. William Blake
      4. Robert Burns
    2. The Romantic Era
      1. William Wordsworth
      2. Samuel Taylor Coleridge
      3. George Gordon Lord Byron
      4. Percy Shelley
      5. John Keats
    3. The Victorian Era
      1. Alfred Lord Tennyson
      2. Robert Browning
      3. Elizabeth Barrett Browning
      4. Matthew Arnold
      5. Christina Rossetti
      6. Lewis Carroll
    4. The Edwardian Era
      1. Oscar Wilde
      2. Thomas Hardy
      3. Gerard Manley Hopkins
      4. A.E. Houseman
    5. Modernism and Beyond
      1. William Butler Yeats
      2. Virginia Woolf
      3. James Joyce
      4. D.H. Lawrence
      5. T.S. Eliot
      6. Robert Graves
      7. W.H. Auden
      8. Dylan Thomas
      9. Seamus Heaney

    Primary Faculty
    Goossen, Carroll
    Secondary Faculty
    Ragan, Mary
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2600 - Introduction to Poetry

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    Readings to discover and understand the pleasures of poetry. Selections from among the best poems produced by Western Civilization. Writing of critical papers.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the structural elements of a poem.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify key structural elements including imagery, diction, symbolism, connotation, tone, musical devices, rhythm, and meter.
    2. Provide meaningful descriptions of the structures of works being studied.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to write an essay of literary analysis that springs from the student’s independent interpretation.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and analyze the poet’s use of poetic devices (especially diction, figurative language, and metrical devices) as they contribute to a unified reading of the poem.
    2. Recognize and analyze a poem’s occasion and point of view.
    3. Recognize the poem as an artistic creation of the whole person: reason, imagination, and emotion.
    4. Develop a sympathetic response to the way the poet sees the world and to the attempt to order that world for the sake of poetic presentation.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of the course, the student will be able to write an essay of literary analysis, incorporating insights from secondary sources and documenting them with proper MLA format.

    Objectives:

    1. Offer an effective controlling idea in the introduction.
    2. Use appropriate support and evidence in the body of the essay.
    3. Organize the essay effectively, using topic sentences, transitions, and other devices as appropriate.
    4. Document sources according to MLA guidelines.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Definition: What is poetry?
    2. Recognizing the tools or ingredients of poetry
      1. Tropes
      2. Occasion
      3. Imagery
      4. Diction
      5. Symbolism
      6. Allusions
      7. Connotation and denotation
      8. Tone
      9. Musical devices
      10. Rhythm
      11. Meter
      12. Common forms: sonnet, ballad, villanelle, sestina, etc.
    3. The Writer’s System of Values
      1. Common themes
      2. Historical developments
      3. Literary movements
      4. Socio‐economic influences
      5. Multiculturalism
    4. The Writer’s Conception of the World
      1. Reason
      2. Imagination
      3. Emotion

    Primary Faculty
    Kos, Andrew
    Secondary Faculty
    Bily, Cynthia
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2610 - Introduction to Prose Fiction

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    This course emphasizes the reading and discussion of fiction, such as novels, novellas, and short stories. Class work includes readings, discussions, and lectures on a diverse selection of prose fiction from various places and times with a consideration of the individual work’s style, form, and milieu. Students will write critical papers.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the structural elements of the works being studied.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify key structural elements of a text.
    2. Provide meaningful descriptions of the structures of the works being studied.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to understand and critically evaluate the theme, tone, point of view, and setting of works being studied.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss the theme, tone, point of view, and setting of prose fiction works.
    2. Discuss how the author’s concerns, style, persona, and description of setting contribute to the way prose fiction works.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to demonstrate an ability to analyze character.

    Objectives:

    1. Develop criteria for analyzing character.
    2. Recognize and discuss the contribution of setting, theme, tone, and structure to the reader’s perception of character.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to develop an individual evaluation of the writer’s conception of the world and the system of values that accompanies it.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss the writer’s use of prose fiction’s common themes.
    2. Evaluate the place of historical forces or events in the writer’s work.
    3. Analyze the writer’s role in literary movements or the writer’s place in the historical development of prose fiction.
    4. Discuss the socio‐economic background presented in the world of the writer’s work.
    5. Compare international and multicultural aspects of the various worlds presented in the works being studied.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to recognize the interplay of reason, imagination, and emotion in prose fiction.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain of the role of reason in the works being studied.
    2. Recognize and discuss the role of imagination in the works being studied.
    3. Evaluate the role of emotion in the works being studied.
    4. Describe prose fiction as the artistic creation of the whole human being, encompassing reason, imagination, and emotion.

    Outcome 6:
    Upon completion of this course the student will be able to write papers that combine literary analysis with correct standard documentation format.

    Objectives:

    1. Shape a controlling idea for each paper, stated in an introduction.
    2. Develop the controlling idea for each paper in a body, using appropriate support and evidence.
    3. Organize each paper appropriately, unifying paragraphs by means of topic sentences, linking paragraphs by a variety of transitions, and arranging the main points effectively.
    4. Summarize the controlling idea of each paper in a conclusion.
    5. Document sources used for each paper according to standard format.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    The course covers prose fiction representing a variety of technical approaches. Novels assigned during the course should not duplicate those included in other course offerings by the department, nor should all be twentieth century products. Whatever the basis for selection, the general characteristics of fiction are emphasized, with the instructor providing background material that helps to place the work into its cultural and historical context as outlined below.

    1. Definition: What is the Novel? Novel, Novella, and other prose fiction.
    2. Reading the Novels.
      1. Setting, Point of View, and Tone.
      2. Character and Theme.
      3. Structure and Plot.
    3. The Writer’s System of Values.
      1. Common Themes.
      2. Historical Developments.
      3. Literary Movements.
      4. Socio‐Economic Backgrounds.
      5. Multiculturalism.
    4. The Writer’s Conception of the World.
      1. Reason.
      2. Imagination.
      3. Emotion.

    Primary Faculty
    Goossen, Carroll
    Secondary Faculty
    Ragan, Mary
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2640 - Children’s Literature

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190  or consent of instructor

    Study of picture books, novels, folk tales, and poetry intended for children from preschool through high school with an emphasis on developing the student’s analytical abilities and broadening the student’s knowledge of children’s literature.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to select appropriate and meaningful literature for children through young adults.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Read a variety of literary works designed for children and young adults, including works in various genres (such as novels, picture books, fairy tales, poetry, and autobiographies).
    2. Identify and apply criteria to evaluate the aesthetic quality of literary works.
    3. Identify and apply criteria to evaluate the appropriateness of literary works based on the developmental stages of children and young adults.
    4. Apply considerations of cultural diversity to selections of reading material for children and young adults.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to write analytical papers focused on the interpretation and/or evaluation of works of literature for children and young adults.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write papers that show technical skill in the organization and development of academic arguments.
    2. Edit writing to minimize errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation, and mechanics.
    3. Integrate and document any secondary research used according to current MLA formats.
    4. Apply current MLA conventions for references to literary works.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply concepts of literary interpretation to primary texts designed for children and young adults.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Use accurate terminology for literary concepts (such as “protagonist” or “plot”) both orally and in writing.
    2. Use literary concepts to arrive at interpretations of works of children and young adult literature and argue for these interpretations orally and/or in writing.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use techniques to engage children and young adults in the study of literature.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Use techniques of oral interpretation to present literary works in a clear and interesting way.
    2. Link themes of literary works to issues that are significant to children and young adults.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    The design of the course should include the following elements but may add to these:

    1. Literary Texts
      1. A variety of major genres of literary texts designed for children and young adults, such as autobiography, poetry, novel, picture book, and fairy tales
      2. Literary texts that are appropriate for preschool through high school
      3. Literary texts that reflect variety in their cultural backgrounds, such as books focused on characters of varying historical time periods, varying ethnic backgrounds, and/or varying family makeup
    2. Elements of Literature
      1. Structural elements, such as plot, setting and characterization
      2. Stylistic elements such as rhyme, meter, and tone
      3. Evaluative elements such as theme and aesthetic criteria
      4. Visual elements such as page design and drawings in picture books
    3. Writing Skills
      1. Methods for writing literary analyses
      2. Review MLA documentation as needed
      3. Conventions for literary references in MLA style
      4. Review academic writing elements such as unity, development, and coherence as needed
      5. Review grammar, punctuation, spelling, and mechanics as needed
    4. Developmental Considerations
      1. Major developmental stages from preschool through high school
      2. Criteria for identifying literary works as appropriate for children and young adults based on their developmental stages
      3. Techniques for introducing children and young adults to literary works, such as giving oral presentations of picture books and writing lesson plans

    Primary Faculty
    McGee, Nancy
    Secondary Faculty
    Brender, Linda
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2710 - American Literature: Colonial to 1865

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    This course begins with the earliest American literature written by Native Americans and moves on to European expectations, settlements, and explorations of the “New World.” It also covers the literature of the American Revolution, the literary life of the new nation, and culminates in the voices of American Romanticism and anti-slavery reform. Authors to be covered may include Bradford, Winthrop, Edwards, Bradstreet, Franklin, Wheatley, Jefferson, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Douglass.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the multi‐cultural origins of American literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and analyze the literature of exploration.
    2. Recognize and analyze Native American stories and myths.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of Puritanism.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the cultural environment from which Puritanism emerged.
    2. Analyze/distinguish among the specific forms of this literature: sermon, poetry, historical narratives, spiritual autobiography.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the literature of the 18th century.

    Objectives:

    1. Analyze the cultural environment from which this literature emerged.
    2. Analyze the Age of Enlightenment as expressed through the political writings of the American Revolution.
    3. Analyze the Age of Enlightenment as expressed through the growth of autobiography.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of Romanticism.

    Objectives:

    1. Analyze the cultural environment from which this literature emerged.
    2. Explain the rise of the narrative form.
    3. Identify/explain Transcendentalism and its characteristics.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the literature arising from the debate over slavery.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the cultural environment from which this literature arose.
    2. Identify and analyze abolitionist literature.
    3. Analyze slave narratives.

    Outcome 6:
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write literary analysis papers using correct MLA documentation format.

    Objectives:

    1. Shape a controlling idea for each paper, stated in an introduction.
    2. Develop the controlling idea for each paper in a body, using appropriate support and evidence.
    3. Organize each paper appropriately, unifying paragraphs by means of topic sentences, linking paragraphs by a variety of transitions, and arranging the main points effectively.
    4. Summarize the controlling idea of each paper in a conclusion.
    5. Document sources used for each paper according to acceptable MLA format.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Native American literary tradition
      1. Oral narrative
      2. Oral poetry
    2. Literature of exploration
      1. New Spain
      2. New France
      3. Chesapeake
    3. Puritanism
      1. Historical narrative
      2. Spiritual autobiography
      3. Sermons
      4. Poetry
    4. Eighteenth Century literature
      1. Age of Enlightenment
      2. Political writings of the American Revolution
      3. Growth of autobiography
    5. Romanticism
      1. Rise of the narrative form
      2. Transcendentalism
    6. The debate over slavery
      1. Abolitionist literature
      2. Slave narratives

    Primary Faculty
    Brinker, Ludger
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2720 - American Literature, 1865 to 1920

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    This course presents a study of major cultural and literary developments between the end of the Civil War and the end of World War I. We will consider Reconstruction, Western Expansion, industrialization and urban growth, the role of the new immigrants, the “woman question” and how these issues found literary expression in what is commonly referred to as Realism and Naturalism. Authors to be discussed may include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Davis, James, Howells, Dreiser, Crane, Norris, Cahan, Dos Passos, Gilman, Chopin, Wharton, Freeman, Jewett, Sinclair, Dunbar, and Chesnutt.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of Realism.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain Realism as a literary technique and as a historical construct.
    2. Recognize the continuation of Romantic attitudes and techniques in the works of this period.
    3. Identify and explain the growing international awareness of American writers and the impact of this awareness upon their work.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of Naturalism.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain Naturalism as a literary technique and as a historical construct.
    2. Analyze the increasing concern of some writers with social issues.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write papers that combine literary analysis with correct standard documentation format.

    Objectives:

    1. Shape a controlling idea for each paper, stated in an introduction.
    2. Develop the controlling idea for each paper in a body, using appropriate support and evidence.
    3. Organize each paper appropriately, unifying paragraphs by means of topic sentences, linking paragraphs by a variety of transitions, and arranging the main points effectively.
    4. Summarize the controlling idea of each paper in a conclusion.
    5. Document sources used for each paper according to acceptable standard format.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Realism
      1. Early Realism
      2. The Gilded Age
      3. Regionalism
    2. Naturalism
      1. Urban growth and industrialization
      2. Immigration

    Primary Faculty
    Brinker, Ludger
    Secondary Faculty
    Ragan, Mary
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2730 - American Literature, 1920 to Present

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190  

    This course traces the cultural and literary concerns faced by Americans in the twentieth century; the Depression, World War II, post-war prosperity, the ethnic revival of the sixties, and the current political, social, and cultural concerns. Authors to be covered may include Anderson, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Hurston, O’Connor, Welty, Cummings, Wright, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Odets, O’Neill, Miller, Gold, Ellison, Bellow, Malamud, Roth, Updike, Frost, Eliot, Sandburg, Williams, Millay, Moore, Toomer, Hughes, Baraka, Brooks, Baldwin, and Walker, as well as various 21st Century voices and authors.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the concepts of Modernism.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify key elements of a Modern text, including its shift to experimentation in structures and form.
    2. Provide meaningful descriptions of the characteristics of Modernism.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to understand and critically evaluate the concepts of Social Realism, Neo‐Romanticism, and Existentialism through examples found in 20th Century literature.

    Objectives:

    1.  Study and analyze literature representative of the Great Depression and pre‐WWII America.
    2. Examine socially relevant works in various genres of 20th Century literature.
    3. Explore the psychology of characters in literature as representative of the psyche of post‐WWII Americans.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to identify and articulate the concepts of Post‐modernism in American Literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Read and discuss literary works characteristic of post‐WWII America.
    2. Examine the pattern of development of the American novel since WWII.
    3. Study and analyze the use of Realism and Experimentation in Post‐modern and Contemporary Literature.
    4. Explore the shift in all areas of American Literature to a less structured and more open form.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to read and analyze diverse and multicultural voices in 20th and 21st Century literature.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss the influence of the various Rights movements of the late 20th and 21st centuries.
    2. Explore various new voices and genres.
    3. Recognize the growth of Neo‐romantic interest in Experimentation in poetry of the period.
    4. Note the role of film as a mode of extending literature to an increasingly visual‐oriented America.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to write papers that combine literary analysis with standard documentation format.

    Objectives:

    1. Shape a controlling idea for each paper, stated in an introduction.
    2. Develop the controlling idea for each paper in a body, using appropriate support and evidence.
    3. Organize each paper appropriately, unifying paragraphs by means of topic sentences, linking paragraphs by a variety of transitions, and arranging the main points effectively.
    4. Summarize the controlling idea of each paper in a conclusion.
    5. Document sources used for each paper according to standard format.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Definition: What are the identifiable literary characteristics of literature in the 20th and 21st centuries?
    2. Reading the Literature.:
      1. Modernism in 20th Century Literature.
      2. Post‐WWII Literature.
      3. Harlem Renaissance
      4. Post‐modern Literature of the 1960s and 1970s.
      5. Neo‐romanticism and Neo‐modernism.
      6. Experiments in Poetry.
      7. Socially Relevant Drama.
      8. Significant voices, styles and techniques in Contemporary Literature.
    3. The Writer’s System of Values.:
      1. Common Themes.
      2. Historical Developments.
      3. Shift to Experimental Literature.
      4. Socio‐Economic Backgrounds.
      5. Multiculturalism.
    4. The Writer’s Conception of the World:
      1. Movement toward Satire as a Weapon.
      2. Fragmentation of Literary Texts to Reflect the World.
      3. Creation of New Forms (antinovel and antihero) to Reflect the New World.

    Primary Faculty
    Masters, Marie
    Secondary Faculty
    Ragan, Mary
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2740 - Introduction to African-American Literature

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190  

    This course introduces students to the African-American literary tradition and facilitates critical thinking, reading, and writing through the interpretation of texts significant to the African-American experience. The course exposes students to such issues as literacy and Enlightenment values, power relations, survival and resistance strategies, race relations and identity formation, and changing literary standards and writers’ responses to those changes. Literature to be read, discussed, and analyzed may include slave narratives, novels, short stories, plays, poems, spirituals, lyrics, speeches, essays, and articles conceived by such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Chesnutt, Johnson, Washington, Du Bois, Larsen, Hughes, Hurston, Locke, Toomer, Garvey, Attaway, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Baraka, Kincaid, Morrison, and Walker.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to explain the role literacy and Enlightenment standards played in directing and defining 18th and 19th century African‐American writing, and African‐American writers’ efforts to meet, exceed, and/or challenge those standards.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify elements of African‐American texts that reveal efforts to meet, exceed, and/or challenge Enlightenment standards.
    2. Describe Enlightenment standards as they relate to African‐American literature.
    3. Identify the use of vernacular in slave narratives, hymns, spirituals, and folktales.
    4. Analyze the use of vernacular in slave narratives, hymns, spirituals, and folktales.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to interpret works that have been categorized as participating in the Harlem Renaissance.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Recognize works from the Harlem Renaissance.
    2. Assess works from the Harlem Renaissance.
    3. Recognize the ways works from the Harlem Renaissance contributed to emerging popular culture.
    4. Explain connections between the Harlem Renaissance and the Great Migration.
    5. Explain Pan‐Africanism.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to critically evaluate the tenets of various literary movements and critical debates fostered by African‐American literature during the 20th century.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify elements of an urban realism text, including seting and the impact of social forces.
    2. Investigate the conflicts and debates over the protest novel.
    3. Explain the conflicts and debates over the protest novel.
    4. Analyze literature and polemics advocating a black arts movement.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to interpret examples of contemporary African‐American literature.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Recognize and discuss the multiplicity of African‐American identities.
    2. Identify the uses of history in contemporary African‐American fiction.
    3. Assess works produced by an emerging community of black women writers.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to write papers that combine literary analysis with standard documentation format.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Shape a controlling idea for each paper, stated in an introduction.
    2. Develop the controlling idea for each paper in a body, using appropriate support and evidence.
    3. Organize each paper appropriately, unifying paragraphs by means of topic sentences, linking paragraphs by a variety of transitions, and arranging the main points effectively.
    4. Summarize the controlling idea of each paper in a conclusion.
    5. Document sources used for each paper according to standard format.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. 18th and 19th Century Writing
      1. Poetry
      2. Slave Narratives
      3. Abolitionist Literature
      4. Hymns and Spirituals
      5. African‐American Folktales
    2. Harlem Renaissance
      1. Poetry
      2. Literature
      3. Essays
    3. Literary Movements
      1. Urban Realism
      2. Debates over the Protest Novel
      3. Black Arts Movement
    4. Contemporary African‐American Literature
      1. Multiplicity of Identities
      2. Uses of History
      3. Women Writers

    Primary Faculty
    Peller, Scott
    Secondary Faculty
    McGee, Nancy
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2800 - World Literature to 1400

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    World Literature to 1400 provides an examination of works of literature from a variety of cultures, with the time period ranging from the earliest texts known through approximately 1400. Students will apply techniques for literary analysis, including the writing of one or more critical papers that incorporate research on an aspect of world literature.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply major literary concepts to written analyses of primary texts.

    Objectives:

    1. Support their own identification of significant themes of primary texts of world literature.
    2. Identify significant genres in primary texts of world literature.
    3. Identify and analyze the significance of literary devices in primary texts of world literature.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to make connections between their own experiences and the ideas and literary forms of the primary texts through discussions and/or written analyses.

    Objectives:

    1. Analyze elements common to the human experience.
    2. Compare the mutual influence of specific cultural elements and the literary texts.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to evaluate primary texts as aesthetic creations through the oral and/or written application of appropriate criteria.

    Objectives:

    1. Argue for appropriate criteria for making an aesthetic judgment of literary texts.
    2. Apply criteria that are most relevant to the specific literary text.
    3. Express an aesthetic response to the literary texts through the application of relevant criteria.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to conduct research on an aspect of world literature and write a paper (MLA style) based on that research.

    Objectives:

    1. Determine appropriate secondary sources.
    2. Synthesize the results of research and analysis.
    3. Cite the sources used in MLA style.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    The design of the course should include the following elements but may add to these:

    1. Genres
      1. Major genres of literary works common to the cultures under study, such as epic and tragedy
      2. Literary works chosen from a variety of cultures and time periods from the earliest works of literature though approximately 1400 CE., such as Gilgamesh, The Iliad, The Ramayana of Valmiki, Beowulf, The Tale of Genji, Classic of Poetry, The Divine Comedy, and The Song of Roland
    2. Elements of literature
      1. Structural elements such as plot, setting, and characterization
      2. Stylistic elements such as rhyme, meter, and tone
      3. Evaluative elements such as theme and aesthetic criteria
    3. Cultural Aspects
      1. Contexts for literary works under study (such as historical and philosophical influences)
      2. Influence of literary works on contemporary and/or current culture(s)
    4. Writing Skills
      1. Methods for writing literary analyses
      2. Review as needed for finding, evaluating, using, and documenting secondary sources according to MLA formats

    Primary Faculty
    McGee, Nancy
    Secondary Faculty
    Richie, Karen
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2810 - World Literature From 1400

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    World Literature from 1400 provides an examination of works of literature from a variety of cultures, with the time period ranging from approximately 1400 CE on. Students will apply techniques for literary analysis in the writing of one or more critical papers that incorporate research on an aspect of world literature.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply major literary concepts to written analyses of primary texts.

    Objectives:

    1. Support their own identification of significant themes of primary texts of world literature.
    2. Identify significant genres in primary texts of world literature.
    3. Identify and analyze the significance of literary devices in primary texts of world literature.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to make connections between their own experiences and the ideas and literary forms of the primary texts through discussions and/or written analyses.

    Objectives:

    1. Analyze elements common to the human experience.
    2. Compare the mutual influence of specific cultural elements and the literary texts.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to evaluate primary texts as aesthetic creations through the oral and/or written application of appropriate criteria.

    Objectives:

    1. Argue for appropriate criteria for making an aesthetic judgment of literary texts.
    2. Apply criteria that are most relevant to the specific literary text.
    3. Express an aesthetic response to the literary texts through the application of relevant criteria.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course students will be able to conduct research on an aspect of world literature and write a paper based on that research.

    Objectives:

    1. Determine appropriate secondary sources.
    2. Synthesize the results of research and analysis.
    3. Cite the sources used in a standard documentation format.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    The design of the course should include the following elements but may add to these:

    1. Genres
      1. Major genres of literary works common to the cultures under study, such as epic and tragedy
      2. Literary works chosen from a variety of cultures and time periods from approximately 1400 CE on, such as writings by Shakespeare, Cao Xueqin, Moliere, Basho, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Conrad, Yeats, Pirandello, Whitman, and Achebe
    2. Elements of literature
      1. Structural elements such as plot, settng, and characterization
      2. Stylistic elements such as rhyme, meter, and tone
      3. Evaluative elements such as theme and aesthetic criteria
    3. Cultural Aspects
      1. Contexts for literary works under study (such as historical and philosophical influences)
      2. Influence of literary works on contemporary and/or current culture(s)
    4. Writing Skills
      1. Methods for writing literary analyses
      2. Review as needed for finding, evaluating, using, and documenting secondary sources according to MLA formats

    Primary Faculty
    McGee, Nancy
    Secondary Faculty
    Richie, Karen
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    ENGL 2850 - Shakespeare Survey

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

    Study of Shakespeare’s life, sonnets, comedies, histories, and tragedies. Writing of critical papers.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify poetic style and rhetorical devices in Shakespeare’s works.

    Objectives:

    1. By completing a quiz or examination recognizing poetic style in Shakespeare’s works with at least 70 percent accuracy.
    2. By completing a quiz or examination defining rhetorical devices in Shakespeare’s works with at least 70 percent accuracy.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate theme, plot structure, characterization, and socio‐historical seting in Shakespeare’s works.

    Objectives:

    1. By writing an essay that analyzes theme in Shakespeare’s works.
    2. By writing an essay that evaluates plot structure in Shakespeare’s works.
    3. By writing an essay that assesses characterization in Shakespeare’s works.
    4. By writing an essay that examines socio‐historical seting in Shakespeare’s works.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate Shakespeare’s world view and the system of values exhibited in his works.

    Objectives:

    1. By writing an essay that analyzes Shakespeare’s world view.
    2. By writing an essay that evaluates Shakespeare’s system of values.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze and evaluate the major genres of Shakespeare’s art (sonnet, comedy, history, tragedy) and define their characteristics.

    Objectives:

    1. By writing an essay and/or examination that analyzes the sonnets.
    2. By writing an essay and/or examination that evaluates the comedies.
    3. By writing an essay and/or examination that assesses the histories.
    4. By writing an essay and/or examination that examines the tragedies.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Shakespeare’s Language.
      1. Rhythm and Rhyme.
      2. Poetic Devices.
      3. Rhetorical Devices.
    2. Shakespeare’s Sonnets.
      1. Structure and Form.
      2. Content and Love Theme.
    3. Shakespeare’s Comedies.
      1. Theme.
      2. Plot.
      3. Character.
      4. Setting.
      5. World View of the Comedies.
    4. Shakespeare’s Histories.
      1. Theme.
      2. Plot.
      3. Character.
      4. Setting.
      5. World View of the Histories.
    5. Shakespeare’s Tragedies.
      1. Theme.
      2. Plot.
      3. Character.
      4. Setting.
      5. World View of the Tragedies.

    Primary Faculty
    Peller, Scott
    Secondary Faculty
    Kos, Andrew
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    ENGL 2855 - Special Topics in Literature

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ENGL 1190  or ENGL 1220 

    This course is an in-depth examination of a narrowed topic in literature, focused on a specific time period, author, literary movement, or genre. Topics that may be covered include African-American literature, autobiography, detective fiction, the graphic novel, horror, humor, science fiction, the western, women’s studies.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply major literary concepts to written analyses of primary texts.
    Objectives:

    1. Support their own identification of significant themes, characterization, setting, symbolism, etc. of primary texts of the special topic.
    2. Identify significant genres, themes, and literary devices in primary texts of the special topic.
    3. Identify and analyze the significance of literary devices in primary texts of the special topic.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop an individual interpretation of the writer’s conception of the world and the system of values that accompanies it.
    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss the writer’s use of the special topic’s common themes
    2. Evaluate the place of historical forces or events in the writer’s work.
    3. Analyze the writer’s role in literary movements or the writer’s place in the historical development of the special topic.
    4. Discuss the socio-economic background presented in the world of the writer’s work.
    5. Compare international and multi-cultural aspects of the various worlds presented in the works being studied if relevant.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate primary texts as aesthetic creations through the oral and/or written application of appropriate criteria.
    Objectives:

    1. Argue for appropriate criteria for making an aesthetic judgment of literary texts
    2. Apply criteria that are most relevant to the specific literary text.
    3. Express an aesthetic response to the literary texts through the application of relevant criteria.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to conduct research on an aspect of the literature of the special topic and write a paper (MLA style) based on that research.
    Objectives:

    1. Employ appropriate sources.
    2. Analyze an aspect of the literature of the special topic.
    3. Synthesize the results of research and analysis of the literature of the special topic.
    4. Cite, parenthetically and on the works cited page, the sources used (MLA Style).

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    The design of the course should include the following elements but may add to these:

    1. Works
      1. A number of literary works that operate within the confines of the special topic
      2. Works chosen for variety of cultures and time periods if appropriate
    2. Elements of Literature
      1. Structural elements such as plot, setting, and characterization
      2. Stylistic elements such as tone, diction, and word choice
      3. Evaluative elements such as theme and aesthetic criteria
    3. Cultural Aspects
      1. Contexts for literary works under study (such as historical and philosophical influences)
      2. Influence of literary works on contemporary and/or current culture and vice versa
    4. Writing Skills
      1. Methods for writing analysis
      2. Review as needed for finding, evaluating, using, and documenting secondary sources according to MLA documentation.

    Primary Faculty
    Young, James
    Secondary Faculty
    McGee, Nancy
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


English for Academic Purposes

  
  •  

    EAPP 1054 - Academic Speaking & Listening 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: Placement

    (formerly EAPP 0054)

    In EAPP 1054, students will improve their ability to communicate fluently and accurately in academic environments. Students will practice listening to short speeches, communicating in groups, and speaking about academic topics. Correct pronunciation, rhythms of speech, and use of idioms are emphasized.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to verbally share information with the class.

    Objectives: In a brief report the student will:

    1. Give enough information for the audience to understand his/her point.
    2. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    3. Use English at the appropriate register.
    4. Speak loudly enough for everyone to hear.
    5. Show appropriate body language.
    6. Use comprehensible intonation and pronunciation.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to participate actively in small and large group discussions.

    Objectives: During the discussion, the student will:

    1. Make statements that relate to the topic.
    2. Ask questions that relate to the topic.
    3. Answer questions in a way that shows s/he understood the questions.
    4. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    5. Use English at the appropriate register.
    6. Use comprehensible intonation and pronunciation.
    7. Show respect for others by not interrupting or making fun of another student.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to give a brief formal talk.

    Objectives: In a short talk, the student will:

    1. Give enough information for the audience to understand his/her point(s).
    2. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    3. Speak loudly enough for everyone to hear.
    4. Show appropriate body language.
    5. Use comprehensible intonation and pronunciation.
    6. Use English at the appropriate register.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate expansion of his/her vocabulary.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the meaning of idioms.
    2. Correctly use and pronounce new words

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate improvement in his/her listening ability.

    Objectives:

    1. Distinguish between similar sounding sentences.
    2. Identify the number of syllables in a word.
    3. Identify the syllable that gets the most stress.
    4. Write the missing words on a transcription of the sentences.
    5. Identify the word in a sentence that gets the most stress.
    6. Determine which response to a sentence is logical based on which word is stressed.
    7. Give a logical answer to a question about a statement based on the intonation pattern used by the speaker.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Aspects of speaking and listening
      1. Sounds
        1. Vowels
        2. Consonants
        3. Intonation
          1. Stops
          2. Syllable length
      2. Words
        1. Stress
          1. Vowel length
          2. Vowel clarity
        2. Word stress patterns
      3. Sentences
        1. Emphasis pattern: content words
        2. Emphasis pattern: structure words
      4. Conversation
        1. Pitch patterns
        2. Intonation patterns
    2. Practice modes
      1. Discussion groups
        1. Small
        2. Large
      2. Individual reports
    3. Vocabulary building
      1. Idioms
      2. Words selected from academic word list
      3. Words selected by students from outside sources
      4. Words from articles for discussion

    Primary Faculty
    Pruett-Said, Theresa
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1100 - Integrated Skills & Preparatory Composition 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: Placement

    (formerly ESLL 1010)

    This course introduces students to academic English through writing, reading, speaking, and listening activities. Students will practice using different verb tenses, making questions, learning prepositions, and using adjectives to describe people and places. Students will improve vocabulary and spelling. Regular use of computer lab is included.

    Billable Contact Hours: 5

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate basic listening ability.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Given dictated sentences that include grammatical structures and vocabulary taught during the semester, transcribe the sentences.
    2. Answer listening comprehension questions when asked by the teacher or other students.
    3. Complete listening comprehension activities from the textbook or teacher-designed activities.
    4. Participate in interactive group activities.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to communicate effectively.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    2. Correctly use the grammatical structures taught in the class.
    3. Speak with appropriate rhythm and intonation patterns.
    4. Make effective use of eye contact.
    5. Speak loudly enough to be heard by all listeners.
    6. Give adequate details/examples for the situation.
    7. Participate in group activities.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension skills.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Answer questions about their readings in the textbooks.
    2. Use new vocabulary from their readings in their written and spoken assignments.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an increase his/her vocabulary. Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the meanings of new vocabulary on tests.
    2. Use new vocabulary in written assignments.
    3. Use new vocabulary in speaking activities.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to spell words from a list of common words without using a dictionary.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Given words dictated in context, the student will spell them.
    2. Spell words in their written assignments.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the use of grammatical structures taught in the course.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write sentences that use the grammatical structures.
    2. Combine words and/or sentences to create the grammatical structures.
    3. Edit sentences that illustrate the grammatical structures.
    4. Use grammatical structures taught in this course in written assignments and spoken activities.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to write brief paragraphs using various rhetorical modes and grammatical structures.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write paragraphs in the suggested rhetorical modes using the standard topic sentence-supporting sentence-concluding sentence pattern:
    2. Revise paragraphs following recommendations of the instructor.
    3. In their paragraphs, use grammatical structures taught in this course.
    4. In their paragraphs, use new vocabulary taught in this course.
    5. Write one or more in-class impromptu paragraphs

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Composition
      1. Paragraph
        1. Form (appearance)
        2. Structure
          1. Topic sentences
          2. Supporting sentences
          3. Concluding sentences
      2. Primary assignments (3 - 5 paragraphs)
    2. Grammar
      1. Basic terminology
        1. Parts of speech (except interjection)
        2. Parts of a sentence
        3. Types of sentences
          1. Classified by clauses
            1. Simple
            2. Compound
          2. Classified by function
            1. Statements
              1. Positive
              2. Negative
            2. Questions
              1. Yes/No
              2. Wh-
      2. Structures from grammar textbook
    3. Word knowledge and skills
      1. Common words
      2. Academic vocabulary
      3. Irregular verbs
    4. Reading comprehension (Each unit begins with a reading that contextualizes the grammatical structure.)
      1. Main idea
      2. Supporting points
    5. Speaking
      1. Informal
      2. Academic

    Primary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Padmavathi
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1150 - Extensive Reading 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: Placement

    (formerly ESLL 2914)

    In this course, students in the lower level of the placement range select and read books (primarily classic novels and biographies) that have been written (or rewritten in the case of classic literature) at their ability level. As they read many pages of interesting material, they increase their word recognition ability and general vocabulary, become fluent readers, and learn to enjoy reading in English. Brief oral and written book reports are required.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate improvement in their reading ability.

    Objectives: By reading books written at students’ comprehension level, they will:

    1. Improve their rate of reading.
    2. Expand their vocabulary.
    3. Improve their general reading ability.
    4. Improve their academic reading ability.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Beginning activities
      1. Assessment of Reading levels
      2. Determination of appropriate graded-reader levels
    2. Library orientation and selection of first book
    3. Required work
      1. Students read ESL readers (simplified books)
      2. Write book reports
      3. Give oral book reports
      4. Keep a weekly reading log.
    4. Class activities to foster improved reading skills
      1. Timed repeated readings.
      2. Practice cloze tests.

    Primary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Padmavathi
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1200 - Integrated Skills & Preparatory Composition 2

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: EAPP 1100  with grade C or better; or placement

    (formerly ESLL 1020)

    This course improves students’ academic English through writing, reading, speaking, and listening activities. Students will practice more grammatical structures such as verb tenses, modals, adjectives, and adverbs. Students will write paragraphs using simple and complex sentences. Students will improve vocabulary and spelling. Regular use of computer lab is included.

    Billable Contact Hours: 5

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate low intermediate level listening ability.

    Objectives:

    1. Given dictated sentences that include grammatical structures and intonation patterns taught during the semester, the student will transcribe the sentences.
    2. Answer listening comprehension questions when asked by the teacher or other student
    3. Complete listening comprehension activities from the textbook or teacher-designed activities.
    4. Participate in interactive group activities.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to communicate effectively.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    2. Use the grammatical structures taught in the class.
    3. Speak with appropriate rhythm and intonation patterns.
    4. Make effective use of eye contact.
    5. Speak loudly enough to be heard by all listeners.
    6. Participate in interactive group activities.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Answer questions about the readings in their textbooks.
    2. Use new vocabulary from the readings in written assignments and speaking activities.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an increase his/her vocabulary.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify new vocabulary meanings on tests.
    2. Use new vocabulary in written assignments.
    3. Use new vocabulary in speaking activities.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to spell words from a list of common words without using a dictionary.

    Objectives:

    1. Given words dictated in context, students will spell them.
    2. Student will spell words in their written assignments.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the use of grammatical structures taught in the course.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write sentences that use the grammatical structures.
    2. Combine words and/or sentences to create the grammatical structures.
    3. Edit sentences that illustrate the grammatical structures.
    4. Use grammatical structures taught in this course in written assignments and spoken activities.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to write brief paragraphs using various rhetorical modes and grammatical Structures.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write paragraphs in the suggested rhetorical modes using the standard topic sentence-supporting sentence-concluding sentence pattern:
      1. Using only dictionaries, write one or more in-class impromptu paragraphs.
    2. Revise paragraphs following guidelines of the instructor.
    3. In their paragraphs, use grammatical structures taught in this course.
    4. In their paragraphs, use new vocabulary taught in this course.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Composition
      1. Paragraph
        1. Topic sentence
        2. Supporting points
        3. Conclusion
      2. Primary assignments (3 - 5 paragraphs)
    2. Grammar
      1. Review of basic terms
        1. Parts of speech (except interjection)
        2. Parts of a sentence
        3. Types of sentences
          1. Classified by clauses
            1. Simple
            2. Compound
            3. Complex
          2. Classified by function
            1. Statements
              1. Positive
              2. Negative
            2. Questions
              1. Yes/No
              2. Wh-
      2. Structures as indicated in grammar textbook
    3. Word knowledge and skills
      1. Common words
      2. Academic vocabulary
      3. Irregular verbs
    4. Reading comprehension (Each unit begins with a reading.)
      1. Main idea
      2. Supporting points
    5. Speaking
      1. Informal
      2. Academic

    Primary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Padmavathi
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1254 - Academic Speaking & Listening 2

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: EAPP 1054  with grade C or better; or placement

    In EAPP 1254, students will continue to improve their ability to communicate fluently and accurately in academic environments. Students will practice listening to academic lectures, communicating in groups, and giving speeches on academic topics. Correct pronunciation, rhythms of speech, and use of idioms are emphasized.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to verbally share information with the class.

    Objectives: In a report the student will:

    1. Give enough information for the audience to understand his/her point.
    2. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    3. Use English at the appropriate register.
    4. Speak loudly enough for everyone to hear.
    5. Show appropriate body language.
    6. Use comprehensible intonation and pronunciation.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to participate actively in small and large group discussions.

    Objectives: During the discussion, the student will:

    1. Make statements that relate to the topic.
    2. Ask questions that relate to the topic.
    3. Answer questions in a way that shows s/he understood the questions.
    4. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    5. Use English at the appropriate register.
    6. Use comprehensible intonation and pronunciation
    7. Show respect for others by not interrupting or making fun of another student.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to give a formal academic speech.

    Objectives: In a speech, the student will:

    1. Give a well organized speech so the audience can understand his/her point(s).
    2. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    3. Speak loudly enough for everyone to hear.
    4. Show appropriate body language.
    5. Use comprehensible intonation and pronunciation.
    6. Use English at the appropriate register.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate expansion of his/her vocabulary.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the meaning of idioms.
    2. Correctly use and pronounce new words.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate improvement in his/her listening ability.

    Objectives:

    1. Distinguish between similar sounding sentences.
    2. Identify the number of syllables in a word.
    3. Identify the syllable that gets the most stress.
    4. Write the missing words on a transcription of the sentences.
    5. Identify the word in a sentence that gets the most stress.
    6. Determine which response to a sentence is logical based on which word is stressed.
    7. Give a logical answer to a question about a statement based on the intonation pattern used by the speaker.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Aspects of speaking and listening
      1. Sounds
        1. Vowels
        2. Consonants
        3. Intonation
          1. Stops
          2. Syllable length
      2. Words
        1. Stress
          1. Vowel length
          2. Vowel clarity
        2. Word stress patterns
      3. Sentences
        1. Emphasis pattern: content words
        2. Emphasis pattern: structure words
      4. Conversation
        1. Pitch patterns
        2. Intonation patterns
    2. Practice modes
      1. Discussion groups
        1. Small
        2. Large
      2. Individual reports
    3. Vocabulary building
      1. Idioms
      2. Words selected from academic word list.
      3. Words selected by students from outside sources
      4. Words from articles for discussion

    Primary Faculty
    Pruett-Said, Theresa
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1300 - Integrated Skills & Preparatory Composition 3

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: EAPP 1200  with grade C or better; or placement

    (formerly ESLL 1030)

    This course improves students’ academic English through writing, reading, speaking, and listening activities. Students will practice more verb tenses, including the present perfect, as well as modals, gerunds, and infinitives. Students will use new structures, vocabulary, and complex sentences in longer paragraphs. Regular use of computer lab is also included.

    Billable Contact Hours: 5

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to write well-developed paragraphs using various rhetorical modes and grammatical structures.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write paragraphs in the suggested rhetorical modes using the standard topic sentence-supporting sentence-concluding sentence pattern.
    2. Write one or more in-class impromptu paragraphs.
    3. Write 1-2 summaries of simple reading.
    4. Revise paragraphs following guidelines of the instructor.
    5. In their paragraphs, use grammatical structures taught in this course.
    6. In their paragraphs, use new vocabulary taught in this course.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the use of grammatical structures taught in the course.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write sentences that use the grammatical structures.
    2. Combine words and/or sentences to create the grammatical structures.
    3. Edit sentences that illustrate the grammatical structures.
    4. Use grammatical structures taught in this course in written assignments and spoken activities.
    5. Use other grammatical structures in their assignments.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Write a summary of an article from the textbook or another source of comparable difficulty
    2. Answer questions about the readings in the textbooks.
    3. Use new vocabulary from readings in written assignments and speaking activities.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an increase in his/her vocabulary.

    Objectives:

    1. Use new vocabulary in writing assignments.
    2. Use new vocabulary in speaking activities.
    3. Identify and express meaning of new vocabulary words on tests and quizzes.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to spell words from a list of common and academic words without using a dictionary.

    Objectives:

    1. Given words dictated in context, the student will spell them.
    2. Spell words correctly their written assignments.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to communicate effectively.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    2. Use the grammatical structures taught in the class.
    3. Speak with appropriate rhythm and intonation patterns.
    4. Make effective use of eye contact.
    5. Speak loudly enough to be heard by all listeners.
    6. Give adequate details/examples for the situation.
    7. Participate in interactive group activities.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate intermediate level listening ability.

    Objectives:

    1. Given dictated sentences that include grammatical structures and vocabulary taught during the semester, the student will transcribe the sentences.
    2. Answer listening comprehension questions when asked by the teacher or other students.
    3. Complete listening comprehension activities from the textbook or teacher-designed activities.
    4. Participate in interactive group activities.        

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Composition
      1. A. Paragraphs
        1. Reviews of the basics
          1. Topic sentence
          2. Support
          3. Conclusion
        2. Primary assignments (3 - 5 paragraphs)
      2. Summary papers
    2. Grammar
      1. Review of basic terms
        1. Parts of speech
        2. Parts of a sentence
        3. Types of sentences
          1. Classified by clauses
            1. Simple
            2. Compound
            3. Complex
          2. Classified by function
            1. Statements
            2. Questions
              1. Yes/No
              2. Wh-
      2. Structures
        1. Verb tense review
          1. Introduce present perfect -comparison of past and present perfect usage
        2. Adjectives and adverbs
        3. Gerunds
        4. Infinitives
        5. Modals
        6. Other structures
    3. Word knowledge and skills
      1. Common words
      2. Academic vocabulary
      3. Irregular verbs
    4. Reading comprehension (Each unit begins with a reading.)
      1. Main idea
      2. Supporting points
    5. Speaking
      1. Informal (every class)
      2. Academic discourse

    Primary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Padmavathi
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1360 - Academic Reading & Vocabulary

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: EAPP 1300  with grade C or better; or placement

    In this course, students will learn skills for Academic Reading, Academic Vocabulary, and Discipline related Academic Vocabulary to help them understand Academic textbooks and classroom lectures as well as prepare them for specific career training.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    OUTCOME 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to perform at improved levels of Academic Reading ability in order to transfer knowledge to other content areas.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1.  Examine a range of academic texts and categorize text type, text structure and purpose.
    2.  Summarize and break down relevant written information in academic writing and/ or oral presentations.
    3.  Develop critical reading skills.
    4.  Apply reading strategies to enhance comprehension.

     

    OUTCOME 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply increased usage of a range of vocabulary items from a variety of texts.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1.  Analyze words and definitions.
    2.  Apply vocabulary related to weekly themes and topics.
    3.  Develop control over word formation including parts of speech, synonyms and antonyms.

     

    OUTCOME 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize discipline-specific vocabulary in a corpus-based list.

    OBJECTIVES:

    1.  Identify specific discipline related academic words.
    2.  Analyze words and definitions.
    3.  Use discipline-specific academic words in context.
    4. Distinguish semi-technical vocabulary words used in a text that are not normally found in general English courses.


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    (I). Academic Reading & Vocabulary

                  Academic Word List

                  Preview questions

                  Reading text (varied disciplines)

                  Vocabulary in context

                  Reading Comprehension

                  Think and Discuss: analyze, infer meaning, evaluate

                  Dictionary skills

                  Word Forms

                  Collocations

                  Word parts: Roots, prefixes, noun suffixes, adjective suffix, adverb suffix, and verb suffx

                  Writing: Paraphrasing, defining a term, and short summary

     

    (II). Discipline Specific Vocabulary          

                  Discipline Specific Vocabulary Word List (from corpus)

                  Vocabulary in authentic text

                  Modules: definitions, pictures, practice and assessment

                  Dictionary skills


    Primary Faculty
    Lathers, Padmavathi
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1400 - Integrated Skills & Preparatory Composition 4

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: EAPP 1300  with grade C or better; or placement

    (formerly ESLL 1040)

    This course improves students’ academic English through writing, reading, speaking, and listening activities with a focus on writing and grammar. Students will practice advanced verb tenses, modals in the past, and other advanced grammar structures. Students will write both extended paragraphs and summaries using new structures and vocabulary. Students will improve their academic vocabulary. Regular use of computer lab is also included.

    Billable Contact Hours: 5

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to write well-developed paragraphs using various rhetorical modes and grammatical structures.

    Objectives:

    1. Write paragraphs in the suggested rhetorical modes using the standard topic sentence-supporting sentence-concluding sentence pattern.
    2. Write two or more in-class impromptu paragraphs.
    3. Write summaries of articles from textbooks or equivalent readings.
    4. Revise paragraphs and summaries following the guidelines of the instructor.
    5. In their paragraphs, use grammatical structures taught in this course.
    6. In their paragraphs, use new vocabulary taught in this course.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the use of grammatical structures taught in the course.

    Objectives:

    1. Write sentences that use the grammatical structures.
    2. Combine words and/or sentences to create the grammatical structures.
    3. Edit sentences that illustrate the grammatical structures.
    4. Use grammatical structures taught in this course in written assignments and spoken activities.
    5. Use other grammatical structures in assignments.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Answer questions about the readings in the textbooks.
    2. Use new vocabulary from the readings in written assignments and speaking activities.
    3. Write summaries of articles from the textbooks or other equivalent articles.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an increase in his/her vocabulary.

    Objectives:

    1. Use new vocabulary in writing assignments.
    2. Use new vocabulary in speaking activities.
    3. Identify and express meaning of new vocabulary on tests and quizzes.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to spell general and academic words from a list.

    Objectives:

    1. Given words dictated in context, students will spell them.
    2. Spell words in written assignments.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to communicate in academic discourse.

    Objectives:

    1. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    2. Use the grammatical structures taught in the class.
    3. Speak with appropriate rhythm and intonation patterns.
    4. Make effective use of eye contact.
    5. Speak loudly enough to be heard by all listeners.
    6. Give adequate details/examples for the situation.
    7. Participate in interactive group activities.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate low-advanced listening ability.

    Objectives:

    1. Given dictated sentences that include grammatical structures and vocabulary taught during the semester, the student will transcribe the sentences.
    2. Answer listening comprehension questions when asked by the teacher or other students.
    3. Complete listening comprehension activities from the textbook or teacher-designed activities.
    4. Participate in interactive group activities.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Composition
      1. Paragraphs (3 - 5 paragraphs)
        1. Review of the basics
          1. Topic sentence
          2. Support
          3. Conclusion
      2. Summary-reaction papers ( 1 -2 summaries)
        1. Skills required
          1. Quoting
          2. Paraphrasing
          3. Summarizing
        2. Primary assignments
          1. One - Two summaries of articles from the textbook or other sources of comparable difficulty
    2. Grammar
      1. Reviews of basic terms
        1. Parts of speech
        2. Parts of a sentence
        3. Types of sentences
          1. Classified by clauses
            1.  Simple
            2. Compound
            3. Complex
          2. Classified by function
            1. Statements
            2. Positive
            3. Negative
          3. Questions
            1. Yes/No
            2. Wh-
      2. Grammar from grammar textbook
    3. Word knowledge and skills
      1. Common words
      2. Academic vocabulary
      3. Irregular verbs
    4. Reading comprehension (Each unit begins with a reading.)
      1. Main idea
      2. Supporting points
    5. Speaking
      1. Informal (every class)
      2. Academic discourse

    Primary Faculty
    Pruett-Said, Theresa
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    EAPP 1500 - Integrated Skills & Preparatory Composition 5

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: EAPP 1400  with grade C or better; or placement

    (formerly ESLL 1050)

    This advanced course provides a bridge from EAPP classes to English composition courses. It also prepares students for academic work in other college classes. Students will review grammatical structures and sentence structure with a focus on using a variety of sentence types. Students will write paragraphs, summaries, and essays using new structures and vocabulary. Students will continue to improve their academic vocabulary. Regular use of computer lab is also included.

    Billable Contact Hours: 5

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to write well-developed paragraphs using various rhetorical modes and grammatical structures.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write paragraphs in the different rhetorical modes using the standard topic sentence-supporting sentence-concluding sentence pattern:
    2. Write one or more in-class impromptu paragraphs
    3. Write summaries from articles in the textbook or equivalent with a response for at least one summary
    4. Revise paragraphs and summaries following the guidelines of the instructor.
    5. In their paragraphs, use grammatical structures taught in this course.
    6. In their paragraphs, use new vocabulary taught in this course.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate basic essay-writing ability.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Write 2-3 essays in different rhetorical modes.
      1. Write an introduction that “hooks” the reader and ends with a thesis.
      2. Support the thesis with two or three body paragraphs.
      3. End the essay with a concluding paragraph.
      4. Adhere to college-level standards of grammar and vocabulary.
      5. Students will be exposed to documentation and plagiarism.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate reading comprehension skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Write 1-3 summaries of articles from textbooks or outside sources.
    2. Answer questions about the readings in the textbooks.
    3. Use new vocabulary from the readings in the textbooks in written assignments and speaking activities.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an increase in his/her vocabulary.

    Objectives:

    1. Use new vocabulary in writing assignments and speaking activities.
    2. Identify and express meaning of new vocabulary on tests and quizzes.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to increase their ability to correctly spell words.

    Objectives:

    1. Given words dictated in context, the student will spell them.
    2. Spell words correctly in writing assignments.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the use of grammatical structures taught in the course.

    Objectives:

    1. Write sentences that use the grammatical structures.
    2. Combine words and/or sentences to create the grammatical structures.
    3. Edit sentences that illustrate the grammatical structures.
    4. Use grammatical structures taught in this course in written assignments and spoken activities.
    5. Use other grammatical structures in their assignments.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to effectively communicate in academic discourse.

    Objectives:

    1. Speak clearly enough to be understood.
    2. Use the grammatical structures taught in the class.
    3. Speak with appropriate rhythm and intonation patterns.
    4. Make effective use of eye contact.
    5. Speak loudly enough to be heard by all listeners.
    6. Give adequate details/examples for the situation.
    7. Participate in interactive group activities.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate advanced listening ability.

    Objectives:

    1. Answer listening comprehension questions when asked by the teacher or other students.
    2. Complete listening comprehension activities from the textbook or teacher-designed activities.
    3. Participate in interactive group activities.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Composition
      1. Paragraphs
        1. Review of the basics
          1. Topic sentence
          2. Support
          3. Conclusion
        2. Primary assignments 
      2. Summary-reaction papers
        1. Review of the basics
          1. Quoting
          2. Paraphrasing
          3. Summarizing
          4. Reacting
        2. Primary assignments (1-3 summaries assigned)
      3. Essays
        1. Structure
          1. Introduction
            1. Strategies to “hook” the reader
            2. Thesis
          2. Body
            1. Support for the thesis, including information from two sources
            2. Refutation of an opposing point
          3. Conclusion
        2. Primary assignments (2-3 essays assigned)
    2. Grammar
      1. Review of basic terms
        1. Parts of speech
        2. Parts of a sentence
          1. Subject
          2. Predicate
          3. Phrases
          4. Clauses
        3. Types of sentences
          1. Classified by clauses
            1. Simple
            2. Compound
            3. Complex
            4. Compound-complex
          2. Classified by function
            1. Statements
              1. Positive
              2. Negative
            2. Questions
              1. Yes/No
              2. Wh-
      2. Structures
        1. Verb review
        2. Adjective and adverb clauses
        3. Noun modifiers (articles and quantifiers) and Noun clauses (including indirect speech and embedded questions)
        4. Passive voice
        5. Review of Conditional
        6. Subjunctive
    3. Word knowledge and skills
      1. Common words
      2. Academic vocabulary
      3. Irregular verbs
    4. Reading comprehension (Each unit begins with a reading.)
      1. Main idea
      2. Supporting points
    5. Speaking
      1. Informal (every class)
      2. Academic discourse

    Primary Faculty
    Lathers, Jonathan
    Secondary Faculty
    Lathers, Padmavathi
    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Environmental Science

  
  •  

    ENVS 1050 - Environmental Science

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    This interdisciplinary science course is a study of environmental problems and alternative solutions to these problems. The integral nature of all parts of the environment as well as specific environmental problems are stressed. Such topics as man and his relationship to the environment, energy resource limitations, land use, water and air pollution are included.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of science, technology, and the environment.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the science terms environmental science, interdisciplinary science, law and theory.
    2. Explain environmentalism and its place in human history and technology.
    3. Demonstrate competency with scientific method.
    4. Analyze modern scientific techniques such as data, statistics, graphing, systems and models.
    5. Explain environmental terminology; stewardship, sustainability, conservation, preservation, economics, natural resources.
    6. Evaluate the human impact on the environment and problem solving techniques for environmental issues.
    7. Critique carbon footprints.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the environment and ecosystems.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the biology terms ecology and ecosystems.
    2. Explain how energy flows through a food web and transfers between trophic levels.
    3. Interrelate producer, consumer detritivore, heterotroph, autotroph, decomposer, prey, predator, succession, niche, habitat, competition, resource partitioning, keystone, and indicator species.
    4. Analyze the major terrestrial biomes, giving attention to the climate, soil, and characteristics organisms of various biomes.
    5. Explain biodiversity and natural conservation applying concepts such as species endangerment, species richness, invasive species and extinction.
    6. Justify processes such as evolution, natural selection, adaptation and environmental services.
    7. Appraise the human impact on a variety of ecosystems.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of matter and energy.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the chemistry terms matter, element, atom, molecule, formula, chemical reaction, organic, inorganic, ion, radioactivity and use these terms to interpret environmental science concepts.
    2. Explain the properties of water.
    3. Explain the first and second law of thermodynamics.
    4. Analyze renewable and nonrenewable energy resources.
    5. Explain energy sources; generators, biomass, fracking, fossil fuel, mining, refining, nuclear fission, photovoltaic cells, geothermal, hydrogen fuel cell, turbines, dams and energy efficiency.
    6. Evaluate the anthropogenic factors in the biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles.
    7. Support Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Refuse

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of earth’s structure and solid waste.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the geology terms minerals, resources, layers of the earth and plate tectonics.
    2. Explain the rock cycle.
    3. Interpret soil structures, soil development and soil as a resource
    4. Analyze land use for homesteads, landfills, agriculture, forestry, recreation, mining and wilderness.
    5. Explain solid waste; types, sources, handling and disposal.
    6. Evaluate the human impact related to use of land including national and state parks and monuments.
    7. Critique types of mining practices over time.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of atmosphere and climate.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the physical science topics forces, states of matter, air pressure, climate, weather and the greenhouse effect.
    2. Explain the layers of the atmosphere.
    3. Discover the action and history of ozone and greenhouse gasses.
    4. Analyze climate change including historical and modern evidence.
    5. Explain smog, acid rain, and the major classes of air pollutants.
    6. Summarize the role of air pollution in relation to the human experience including, asthma, bronchitis and COPD.
    7. Summarize the implementation of the Clean Air Act and its result.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of water resources.

    Objectives:

    1. Define hydrology topics such as fresh water, reservoirs, aquifers, wells, watersheds, groundwater, runoff and de/salinization.
    2. Explain the various ways water is essential to life.
    3. Interpret aquatic ecosystems and their components.
    4. Analyze causes of eutrophication and oxygen sag.
    5. Explain the processes of water treatment and waste water managment.
    6. Summarize water pollution in relation to the human experience including sources; chemicals, sewage, sediment, pathogens and the effects.
    7. Assess human and water relationships including waterborne pathogenic diseases, The Great Lakes recreation/shipping and access to clean water.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of population.

    Objectives:

    1. Define sociology topics such as population history, models and demographics.
    2. Explain biological and then human reproductive factors in terms of developing and developed countries.
    3. Interpret population science concepts including carrying capacity, growth rates, birth/death rate, immigration/emigration and biotic potential.
    4. Analyze human hazards and risks.
    5. Explain mortality, morbidity, urbanization, and affluence.
    6. Evaluate world population distributions.
    7. Consider reproductive issues such as women’s rights, sexual education, birth control and government/cultural/religious involvement in reproduction issues.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of food and the big picture.

    Objectives:

    1. Define nutrition topics such as undernutrition, overnutrition, malnutrition and deficiencies.
    2. Explain historical and modern agricultural methods.
    3. Interpret government policy making as it relates to farming and nutrition in the United States.
    4. Critique aquaculture and overfishing.
    5. Explain industrialized agriculture/monculture, CAFOs, pesticides, fertilizers and GMOs.
    6. Analyze food security and how it relates to the environment.
    7. Assess the consequences of obtaining food energy from primarily animals.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Understanding Science, Technology, and The Environment
    2. Ecosystems
    3. Matier and Energy
    4. The Structure of the Earth and Solid Waste
    5. Atmosphere and Climate
    6. Water Resources
    7. Human Population
    8. Food Supply

    Primary Faculty
    Sadorski, Joseph
    Secondary Faculty
    Schafer, Carl
    Associate Dean
    Young, Randall
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Earth Science

  
  •  

    ESCI 1210 - Earth Science

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly NATS 1210)

    This is a lecture/laboratory course for non-science majors. It is a survey of the earth sciences intended to aid the student in understanding the interrelationships of the universe through the investigation of such topics as matter and energy, astronomy, geology, and meteorology.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the organization of the Universe.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss theories of creation of the Universe.
    2. Identify components and organization of the Universe.
    3. Diagram the arrangement of the Solar system.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the structure of the Earth.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify minerals and rocks and discuss their development.
    2. Discuss internal and external forces that impact the Earth’s development.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe weather development on Earth.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss composition and structure of the atmosphere.
    2. Describe moisture, clouds, and precipitation
    3. Discuss air pressure and wind.
    4. Describe weather patterns.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. The nature of Earth Science
      1. Resources
      2. Population
      3. Environmental Problems
    2. How Science Works
      1. Hypothesis
      2. Theory
      3. Scientific Methods
    3. Earth Materials
      1. Minerals
        1. Elements and types of chemical bonds
        2. Properties of Minerals
        3. Mineral Resources
      2. Rocks
        1. Igneous Rocks
          1. Magma vs. Lava
          2. Plutonic structures vs. Volcanic structures
          3. Compositions of igneous rocks
          4. Where igneous rocks form on Earth
        2. Sedimentary Rocks
          1. Clastic vs. chemical sediment
          2. Formation of sedimentary rocks
          3. Where sedimentary rocks form on Earth
        3. Metamorphic Rocks
          1. Foliated vs. Nonfoliated metamorphic rocks
          2. Where metamorphic rocks form on Earth
    4. Internal and External Forces
      1. Plate Tectonics
        1. Divergent boundaries
        2. Convergent boundaries
        3. Transform Boundaries
      2. Earth’s Interior
        1. Core
        2. Mantle
        3. Crust
      3. What drives the motions of the plates?
        1. Convection cells
      4. Running Water
        1. Drainage Basins
        2. River Systems
      5. Glaciers
        1. How glaciers move
        2. Glacial erosion
        3. Glacial deposits
    5. The Atmosphere
      1. Composition
      2. Structure
    6. Moisture, Clouds, Precipitation
      1. Humidity: Relative vs. absolute
      2. Processes that lift air
      3. Condensation and cloud formation
      4. Types of precipitation
    7. Air Pressure and Wind
      1. Isobars
      2. The Coriolis effect
      3. Cyclones vs. anticyclones
    8. Weather Patterns and Severe Weather
      1. Air Masses
      2. Fronts
      3. The Mid‐Latitude cyclone
      4. Thunderstorms
      5. Tornadoes
      6. Hurricanes
    9. Astronomy
      1. The Solar System
        1. Our sun
        2. Planets
        3. Moons
        4. Asteroids, meteoroids, comets
      2. Earth‐Moon system
        1. Phases of the Moon
        2. Earth’s Seasons
        3. Eclipses: Lunar and Solar
      3. Beyond our Solar System
        1. Properties of stars
          1. Brightness
          2. Distances between stars
        2. Star formation and evolution
        3. Stellar Remnants
          1. White Dwarfs
          2. Neutron Stars
          3. Black Holes
        4. Galaxies
          1. The Milky Way Galaxy
          2. Other types of galaxies
        5. Theories of Formation
          1. The Big Bang
          2. The Steady State model

    Primary Faculty
    Schafer, Carl
    Secondary Faculty
    Sadorski, Joseph
    Associate Dean
    Young, Randall
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Finance

  
  •  

    FINC 1010 - Introduction to Finance

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: ACCT 1080  

    (formerly CRFN 1030)

    FINC 1010 introduces students to the various financial markets fundamental concepts of finance and is intended for business majors with an interest in the field of finance. Emphasis is on exploring the function and operation of the Federal Reserve System, interest rates, the characteristics of different financial markets/institutions, and financial risk management. Students learn how these topics relate to financial management in the business environment. This course will provide an overview of the financial management function and how it relates to the business environment. Topics to which students will be introduced to an introductory level include: Time Value of Money, Financial Statement Analysis, Financial Instruments and Capital Budgeting. Students will be introduced to a financial calculator in this course.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the goals and functions of financial management.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the field of finance.
    2. Distinguish between the various forms of business organizations.
    3. Discuss the role of corporate governance, social responsibility, and ethical behavior.
    4. Explain the role of financial markets and identify the various classifications.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain the importance of time value of money concepts.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply the time value of money concepts when calculating the present value and future value of lump sums.
    2. Identify the different types of annuities.
    3. Apply the time value of money concepts when calculating the present value and future value of both an ordinary annuity and annuity due.
    4. Explain the difference between normal, periodic and effective interest rates.
    5. Apply the basic functions of a financial calculator.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to perform basic financial statement analysis.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the basic financial statements and identify the kinds of information that they provide to corporate managers and investors.
    2. Explain what ratio analysis is.
    3. Calculate ratios from five major categories.
    4. Analyze ratios from five major categories.
    5. Perform basic trend analysis over a period of time.
    6. Compare a firm’s ratios with those of other firms (benchmarking).

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain basic capital budgeting techniques.

    Objectives:

    1. Define capital budgeting.
    2. Define the cost of capital.
    3. Calculate payback period, internal rate of return and net present value.
    4. Identify the pros and cons of using each capital budgeting method introduced.
    5. Explain why the weighted average cost of capital (WACC) is used in capital budgeting.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to explain the basics behind financial instruments and risk.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify factors that influence the cost of money
    2. Describe what CAPM is
    3. Identify the factors that go into how interest rates are determined.
    4. Discuss how bond and stock prices are determined in the market.
    5. Differentiate between stocks and bonds.
    6. Compare and contrast the basic rights of a stockholder and bondholder.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Introduction to Financial Management
      1. An Overview of Financial Management
      2. Financial Markets and Institutions
    2. Fundamental Concepts in Financial Management
      1. Financial Statements, Cash Flow and Taxes
      2. Analysis of Financial Statements
      3. Time Value of Money
    3. Financial Assets
      1. Interest Rates
      2. Bonds and Their Valuation
      3. Risk and Rates of Return
      4. Stocks and Their Valuation
    4. Investing in Long‐Term Assets: Capital Budgeting
      1. The Cost of Capital
      2. The Basics of Capital Budgeting

    Primary Faculty
    Newman, Brian
    Secondary Faculty
    Jex, Fred
    Associate Dean
    Johnson, Elise
    Dean
    Balsamo, Michael



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Fire Science

  
  •  

    FIRE 1010 - Fundamentals of Fire Prevention

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Organization and function of the fire prevention organization; inspections, surveying and mapping procedures; recognition of fire hazards; engineering a solution to the hazard; enforcement of the solution; public relations as affected by fire prevention.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES

    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify and define the legal aspects of administering and enforcement of the fire prevention code.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the forms of local government and laws.
    2. Identify state and federal laws.
    3. Define administration, law and enforcement.
    4. Define search and seizure, due process and equal protection.
    5. Define intentional and negligent wrongdoing and liability attached.
    6. Define civil rights action.
    7. Identify the role of the witness.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the various aspects of conducting fire inspections.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify steps necessary for preparation of an inspection.
    2. Demonstrate how to conduct an inspection.
    3. Define the use of photography and inspection drawings.
    4. Demonstrate a closing interview.
    5. Given a list of violations of an occupancy, submit a written report
      1. Containing pertinent information; e.g., name, address, date, occupancy.
      2. Citing the code chapter and section applicable to the violation.
      3. Listing the corrective measures to be taken.
      4. Describing follow‐up inspections.
    6. Define appeals procedures, enforcement procedures and judicial review.
    7. Identify complaint handling.
    8. Identify effective record management.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: given a building, identify its use, occupancy, and compliance for fire safety.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the occupancy and use groups.
    2. Define the types of construction.
    3. Define open burning.
    4. Identify precautions against fire.
    5. Identify means of egress components.
    6. Identify fire protection systems.
    7. Define emergency preparedness.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to determine which requirements are applicable based on the review of construction plans.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Define Fire Resistance Rating.
    2. Define fire protection requirements.
    3. Identify special fire protection features.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to determine which requirements are applicable based on the hazardous material(s) and system(s) involved.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Define a hazardous material.
    2. Define hazards associated with hazardous materials.
    3. Identify the fire requirements for hazardous material storage.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Session and Topic:

    1. Introductions/Course Overview/Fire in America
    2. Wingspread/Interviewing/Introduction to Codes
    3. Codes/Standards/Ordinances
    4. Use Groups/Fire Separation
    5. Construction Types/Written Assignments
    6. Means of Egress
    7. Means of Egress Continued/Review for Mid‐term Exam
    8. Mid‐term Exam
    9. Site Plans
    10. Construction Plans
    11. Fire Suppression System/Plans
    12. Fire Alarm System/Plans
    13. Interior Finish/Occupant Loads/Written Assignment Due
    14. Role Play “Council Meeting”
    15. Final Exam
    16. To Be Announced - Possible Field Trip or On‐campus Group Activity

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    FIRE 1020 - Principles of Emergency Services

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly FIRE 1000)

    This course provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to illustrate the history of the fire service.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the history.
    2. Evaluate the culture of the fire service.
    3. Analyze the basic components of fire as a chemical chain reaction, as well as the major phases of fire.
    4. Examine the main factors that influence fire spread and fire behavior.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to compare and contrast the components and development of the fire and emergency services.

    Objectives: 

    1. Describe the major organizations that provide emergency response service, including how they interrelate.
    2. Explain the scope, purpose, and organizational structure of fire and emergency services.
    3. Differentiate between fire service training and education.
    4. Explain the value of higher education to the professionalization of the fire service.
    5. Define the role of national, state, and local support organizations in fire and emergency services.
    6. Describe the common types of fire and emergency service facilities, equipment, and apparatus.
    7. Compare and contrast effective management concepts for various emergency situations.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze careers in fire and emergency services.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify fire protection and emergency-service careers in both the public and private sector.
    2. Explain the primary responsibilities of fire prevention personnel, including code enforcement, public information, and public and private protection systems.
    3. Develop the components of career preparation and goal setting.
    4. Demonstrate the importance of wellness and fitness as it relates to emergency services.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Careers in the Fire Protection/Emergency Services
      1. Opportunities/Private, Industrial, Local, Municipal, State and Federal
      2. Pay, Hours of Duty, Benefits, Promotion and Retirement Qualifications
      3. Work Ethics and Human Relations Education and Training
        1. Certificates
        2. Degrees
        3. Selection Process
    2. History
      1. Evolution of the Fire Protection
      2. The U.S. Fire Problem: Life and Property
    3. Fire Prevention and Public Fire Education
      1. Fire Investigation
      2. Code Enforcement
      3. Public Education
    4. Scientific Terminology
      1. Fire Behavior
      2. Flammability and Characteristics of Solids, Liquids and Gases
    5. Building Design and Construction
    6. Fire Detection and Suppression Systems
    7. The Role of Public and Private Support Organizations
      1. Local
      2. State
      3. Federal and National
      4. International
    8. Fire and Emergency Services Equipment and Facilities Management
      1. Emergency Operations
      2. Organizational Structure of Fire and Emergency Services

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    FIRE 1110 - Fire Behavior & Combustion

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    This course provides an understanding of the basic principles of fire chemistry, the process of fire combustion, fire behavior and an examination of the effects of fire behavior on the safety of individual firefighters. The course also categorizes the components of fire and explains the physical and chemical properties of fire.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the physical properties of the three states of matter.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain why radiative, conductive, and convective heat transfer in fires is especially important.
    2. Compare thermally thin and thermally thick materials related to heat conduction and radiation.
    3. Explain how the methods of heat transfer create issues in firefighting with the development and movement of fire.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to categorize the components of fire.

    Objectives:

    1. Distinguish measurement in understanding fire behavior.
    2. Describe the process of combustion.
    3. Identify oxidizers in a fire scenario
    4. Restate the two main types of smoke aerosols.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the properties of fire.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain flammability, in terms of both fire properties and practical application.
    2. Describe the nonflaming and flaming stages of fire.
    3. Define the categorization of flames.
    4. Describe diffusion and turbulent diffusion flames.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the process of burning.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the three zones of the plume of a fire burning in the relationship of air entrainment into the flame.
    2. Demonstrate the principal combustion products formed in fires.
    3. Describe the three significant differences between the burning of solid fuel and the burning of gaseous and liquids fuels.
    4. Explain how soot forms.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the concepts associated with the chemistry of fire.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the chemical elements that are related to fires.
    2. Identify the smoke flow through different types of buildings.
    3. List the hazards to firefighters and others from a fire.
    4. Indicate acute effects and chronic effects from smoke.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to discuss various materials considered fuel for fires.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the change among the state of matter and the changes in enthalpy associated with each.
    2. Evaluate how char formation and melting occur and how they affect the burning rate.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate the characteristics of water as a fire suppression agent.

    Objectives:

    1. Illustrate different ways water suppresses fire.
    2. Describe the roles of suppression-enhancing additives to water.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to compare the methods of fire extinguishment.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the different types of suppression agents that are effective on fire.
    2. Identify techniques of fire extinguishments.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Introduction

    1. Matter and Energy
    2. The Atom and its Parts
    3. Chemical Symbols
    4. Molecules
    5. Energy and Work
    6. Forms of Energy
    7. Transformation of Energy
    8. Laws of Energy

    I. Units of Measurements

    1. International (SI) Systems of Measurement
    2. English Units of Measurement

    II. Chemical Reactions

    1. Physical States of Matter
    2. Compounds and Mixtures
    3. Solutions and Solvents
    4. Process of Reactions

    III. Fire and the Physical World

    1. Characteristics of Fire
    2. Characteristics of Solids
    3. Characteristics of Liquids
    4. Characteristics of Gases

    IV. Heat and its Effects

    1. Production and Measurement of Heat
    2. Different Kinds of Heat

    V.  Properties of Solid Materials

    1. Common Combustible Solids
    2. Plastic and Polymers
    3. Combustible Metals
    4. Combustible Dust

    VI. Common Flammable Liquids and Gases

    1. General Properties of Gases
    2. The Gas Laws
    3. Classification of Gases
    4. Compressed Gases

    VII. Fire Behavior

    1. Stages of Fire
    2. Fire Phenomena
      1. Flashover
      2. Backdraft
      3. Rollover
      4. Flameover
      5. Heat Flow
    3. Fire Plumes

    VIII. Fire Extinguishment

    1. The Combustion Process
    2. The Character of Flame
    3. Fire Extinguishment

    IX. Extinguishing Agents

    1. Water
    2. Foams and Wetting Agents
    3. Inert Gas Extinguishing Agents
    4. Halogenated Extinguishing Agents
    5. Dry Chemical Extinguishing Agents
    6. Dry Powder Extinguishing Agents

    X. Hazards by Classification Types

    1. Hazards of Explosives
    2. Hazards of Compressed and Liquefied Gases
    3. Hazards of Flammable and Combustible Liquids
    4. Hazards of Flammable Solids
    5. Hazards of Oxidizing Agents
    6. Hazards of Poisons
    7. Hazards of Radioactive Substances
    8. Hazards of Corrosives

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    FIRE 1120 - Principles of Fire & Emergency Services Safety & Survival

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the need for cultural and behavioral change within the emergency services relating to safety, incorporating leadership, supervision, accountability, and personal responsibility.

    Objectives:

    1. Define culture as it applies to the safety and survival behavior of firefighters.
    2. Discuss the attitudes and behaviors that contribute to an unsafe culture within the fire and emergency services.
    3. Describe the elements that impact cultural change within the fire and emergency services.
    4. Describe the importance of changing culture when cultural elements inhibit improved safety.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the need for enhancements of personal and organizational accountability for health and safety.

    Objectives:

    1. Outline the roles and responsibilities that individuals and departments have to ensure safety.
    2. Discuss traditions that have compromised fire and emergency services safety and the role that the individual plays in eliminating the unsafe and promoting the safe traditions.
    3. Identify that learning the causes of line-of-duty deaths (LODDs) and injuries is part of the education, training, and experience needed to be safe while operating on the emergency scene.
    4. Describe changes that need to occur in order to reduce firefighter LODDs and injuries

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate how the concepts of risk management affect strategic and tactical decision- making.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the three principles of risk management
    2. Describe the risk management process.
    3. Explain the need for a continual evaluation process.
    4. Discuss the keys for implementing a successful risk management program.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to  evaluate circumstances that might constitute an unsafe act.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the circumstances that constitute an unsafe practice.
    2. Explain the concept of empowerment as a way to stop unsafe practices.
    3. Compare and contrast the concepts of “challenge and confirm” and “speak up.”
    4. Identify the three-step process of implementing crew resource management (CRM).
    5. Describe the factors that determine an individual’s ability to develop and utilize situational awareness.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to validate the need for national training standards as they correlate to professional development inclusive of qualifications, certifications, and re-certifications.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the importance of training and education in fire and emergency services safety and survival.
    2. Identify the similarities and differences between credentialing, certification, licensure, professional recognition/designation, and accreditation as they relate to the fire and emergency services.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to defend the need for annual medical evaluations and the establishment of physical fitness criteria for emergency services personnel throughout their careers.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the role of health and fitness in the fire and emergency services.
    2. Explain the need to commit fully to firefighter health and fitness.
    3. Discuss the need for a comprehensive wellness program for every fire department.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the vital role of local departments in national research and data collection systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the history of the fire and emergency services safety problem.
    2. Identify institutional factors that make fire and emergency services research difficult.
    3. Describe the importance of historical research to current levels of firefighter safety.
    4. Outline the most common causes of fire and emergency services fatalities, and the systems and definitions used to track them.
    5. Explain the role of research and data in improving firefighter safety.
    6. Identify the sources and uses of national data on firefighter safety.
    7. Identify fire and emergency services, academic partnerships, and collaborations, as well as their funding sources.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to illustrate how technological advancements can produce higher levels of emergency services safety and survival.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss the cultural roadblocks that delay or prevent a fire and emergency services department from embracing new technology.
    2. Recommend current emerging technological equipment that can help make the fire and emergency services safer.
    3. Identify computerized technology that can make the fire and emergency services safer.

    Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the importance of investigating all near-misses, injuries, and fatalities.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe how the lessons learned from a fatality and injury investigation must be communicated to prevent future incidents of a similar nature.
    2. List the basic functions commonly performed in an effective fatality and injury investigation.
    3. Identify the makeup of an investigative team.
    4. Explain the need for effective documentation of a scene.

    Outcome 10: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe how obtaining grants can support safety and survival initiatives.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the brief history of fire department grants.
    2. Identify grant team needs and common success traits and downfalls in grant applications
    3. Perform an internal needs, external needs, and financial assessment.
    4. Research support information for creating proper structure of narrative for grant applications.

    Outcome 11: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain how adopting standardized policies for responding to emergency scenes can minimize near-misses, injuries, and deaths.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss the percentage of line-of-duty deaths (LODDs) attributed to emergency vehicle crashes.
    2. Name best practices relative to emergency response vehicle safety.
    3. Explain the value of policy statements, standard operating procedures/guides (SOPs/SOGs).
    4. List the reasons why one should always be seated and seat belted whenever an emergency vehicle is in motion.
    5. Identify the criticality of responding to a violent incident or one that could turn violent.
    6. Identify innovations that can make driving an emergency vehicle safer.

    Outcome 12: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the need for counseling and psychological support for emergency services personnel and their families, while identifying access to local resources and services.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify at least three potentially traumatic events experienced by firefighters.
    2. Distinguish among stress, strain, and resilience.
    3. Describe essential components of a fire and emergency services member assistance program and the Trauma Screening Questionnaire.
    4. Apply the concept of knowledge translation to counseling and psychological support in the fire and emergency services.
    5. Distinguish between the principles of critical incident stress management and those of psychological first aid.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    I. Introduction

    1. History of Fire Service Culture
    2. Organizational Culture
    3. Individual Role in Culture/Behavior
    4. History of Line of Duty Deaths and Injuries Statistics
    5. Defining the Nature of the Problem

    II. The National Context, Health and Safety

    1. NFPA, OSHA
    2. Medical and Fitness Standards
    3. Data Collection (NFIRS)
    4. Research/Investigation (NIST, NIOSH)

    III. Training, Equipment, Response

    1. Training, Certification, Credentialing
    2. Apparatus and Equipment
    3. Emergency Response - Response to Emergency Scenes
    4. Violent Incidents
    5. Emerging Technologies

    IV. Organizational Health and Safety Profile

    1. Personal and Organizational Accountability
    2. Present Condition/Culture
    3. Investigations - Internal
    4. Analyzing your Profile
    5. Utilizing Grants to Meet Needs

    V. Risk Management

    1. Risk Management Concepts and Practices
    2. Unsafe Acts
    3. Empowerment Definition

    VI. Prevention

    1. Home Fire Sprinklers
    2. Code Enforcement
    3. Public Education/Fire and Life Safety
    4. Counseling and Psychological Support

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FIRE 2000 - Basic Fire Academy-Firefighter 1

    Credit Hours: 6.00


    Prerequisites: Consent of Department and acceptable score on reading placement test. Persons taking this course must be at least 18 years of age, have a valid Michigan driver’s license, and no felony convictions.

    FIRE‑2000 is for students who are currently employed by a fire department recognized by the Michigan Fire Marshall, are currently seeking employment, and/or are a volunteer in a recognized fire district. This course provides an introduction to basic fire suppression, prevention procedures, and skill development. This course meets the State‑mandated requirements for preparing students to take the exam for State certification for entry‑level or on‑call or volunteer firefighters.

    Billable Contact Hours: 9

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of fire department organizational structure and distinguish the duties and functions of department personnel.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe the history and culture of the fire service.
    2. State the mission of the fire service.
    3. Define fire department organizational principles to their descriptions.
    4. Distinguish among functions of fire companies and duties.
    5. List typical duties of a Firefighter I.
    6. Summarize primary knowledge and skills the firefighter must have to function effectively.
    7. Match fire department personnel to their primary roles.
    8. Match special operations personnel to their primary responsibilities.
    9. Match fire prevention, emergency medical services, and training personnel to their primary responsibilities.
    10. Relate facts specific to fire department regulations and standard operating guidelines.
    11. Identify the major operational positions within the Incident Management System (IMS) structure.
    12. Match IMS terms to their definitions.
    13. Select facts about implementing and Incident Management System.
    14. Select facts on how the fire service interacts with other organizations.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, the student will identify basic department, station, apparatus, and tool safety procedures and guidelines.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. List ways to prevent firefighter injuries.
    2. Discus the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards related to firefighter health and safety.
    3. Discus Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations.
    4. List areas in which an employee assistance program can be beneficial.
    5. Discuss firefighter health considerations and employee assistance and wellness programs.
    6. Select facts about safety while riding or driving fire apparatus.
    7. Discuss safety in the fire station.
    8. Demonstrate the proper use of apparatus safety equipment.
    9. Demonstrate safely mounting and dismounting fire apparatus.
    10. Demonstrate proper lifting techniques.
    11. List general safety procedures for hand tools and power tools.
    12. List safety rules for power saws.
    13. Select facts about emergency scene safety.
    14. Explain the importance of personnel accountability.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to predict probable fire behaviors and identify the actions necessary to change or prevent these behaviors.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match measurement terms to their definitions.
    2. Define energy and work.
    3. Match types and states of energy to their definitions.
    4. Define power.
    5. Match heat and temperature terms to their definitions.
    6. Distinguish among the three methods of heat transfer.
    7. Match properties of matter to their definitions.
    8. State the Law of Conservation of Mass-Energy.
    9. Identify chemical reactions.
    10. Define fire.
    11. Provide examples of oxidation.
    12. Explain combustion using the fire tetrahedron.
    13. Select facts about oxidizing agents.
    14. Select correct and incorrect facts about fuel characteristics.
    15. Explain how gases evolve from solids and liquids.
    16. Provide specific examples of each source of chemical and electrical heat energy.
    17. Describe ways in which mechanical and nuclear heat are generated.
    18. Identify stages of compartment fire development.
    19. List factors that affect fire development.
    20. Define flameover and rollover.
    21. Explain why thermal layering is critical to firefighting activities.
    22. Describe methods used to control and extinguish fire.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify basic structural characteristics of building construction types and signs and causes of potential collapse.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe common building materials.
    2. Match building construction types as defined in NFPA (National Fire Protection Association) 1001 to their basic structural characteristics.
    3. Match building construction classifications as defined in NFPA 1001 to their building construction descriptions.
    4. Describe construction types and the effect fire has on the structural integrity of the construction type.
    5. Distinguish among types of walls as defined in the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1001.
    6. Identify indicators of building collapse.
    7. List actions to take when imminent building collapse is suspected.
    8. List firefighting hazards related to construction.
    9. Indicate hazards associated with lightweight and truss construction.
    10. List factors that increase fire risk in buildings under construction, being renovated, or demolished.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, the student will demonstrate proficiency in use of personal protective clothing and use of a Personal Accountability Safety System (PASS) device.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match articles of protective clothing and equipment to their correct functions.
    2. Select facts about personal protective gear.
    3. Correctly don firefighting personal protective (turnout) gear in a 60 second time frame.
    4. List four hazardous atmospheres that require the firefighter to wear SCBA.
    5. Match toxic atmospheres to their characteristics.
    6. Match toxic atmospheres to their sources.
    7. Match toxic atmospheres to locations in which they are most likely to be found.
    8. Select facts about hazardous substances and atmospheres.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to safely use, clean, refill, inspect, and store Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA).

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. List physical, mental, and medical factors that affect the firefighter’s ability to use SCBA.
    2. Describe equipment and air-supply limitations of SCBA.
    3. List characteristics of open-circuit and closed-circuit SCBA.
    4. Label the components and safety features of an SCBA.
    5. Match SCBA components to their functions.
    6. Complete precautions for safe SCBA use.
    7. Complete guidelines for correcting emergency situations while wearing SCBA.
    8. Complete recommendations for the use of PASS devices.
    9. Select from a list guidelines general to donning the facepiece and doffing all types of SCBA.
    10. Don and doff open-circuit SCBA using over-the-head and coat methods, and from compartment or backup mounts.
    11. Operate in areas of obscured visibility while wearing SCBA.
    12. Exit a constricted opening while wearing SCBA.
    13. Change an SCBA cylinder “on scene.”
    14. Refill an SCBA cylinder.
    15. Select facts about SCBA operation, use, and maintenance.
    16. Clean, sanitize, and inspect an SCBA unit.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and use portable fire extinguishers to extinguish small Class A, Class B, and Class C fires.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify types of portable fire extinguishers.
    2. Select facts about the portable fire extinguisher rating system.
    3. Match extinguisher symbol shapes to fire classification letters.
    4. Match extinguisher pictographs to the extinguisher’s intended applications.
    5. List factors for selecting the proper portable extinguisher.
    6. List general guidelines for portable extinguisher operation.
    7. Select facts about fire extinguisher inspection, damage, and obsolescence.
    8. Extinguish Class A, Class B, and Class C fires with the proper fire extinguishers.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and properly knot, use, and maintain various types of rope used in the fire service.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Distinguish between life safety and utility rope applications.
    2. List criteria for reusing life safety rope.
    3. Match rope materials to their descriptions.
    4. Select facts about rope construction.
    5. List basic guidelines for rope care and maintenance.
    6. List reasons for removing rope from service.
    7. Inspect a rope for serviceability.
    8. Select facts about rope cleaning and storage.
    9. Coil and uncoil rope.
    10. Demonstrate the proper procedure for cleaning rope.
    11. Label knot elements.
    12. Match knots to their primary applications.
    13. Tie knots commonly used in the fire service.
    14. List hoisting and safety considerations.
    15. Hoist tools and equipment utilizing approved knots.

    Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to conduct a search and rescue in a structure operating as a member of a team.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Distinguish between rescue and extrication operations.
    2. State the objectives of a building search.
    3. Define primary search and secondary search.
    4. Discuss conducting search operations.
    5. Explain what actions a firefighter should take when in distress, or becomes trapped or disoriented.
    6. List safety guidelines for search operations within buildings.
    7. Select facts about victim removal.
    8. Demonstrate using a right hand and left hand search pattern to locate a victim within a structure with conditions of obscured visibility.
    9. Conduct a primary and secondary search.
    10. Demonstrate moving an injured victim to safety using appropriate drags, carries, and stretchers.

    Outcome 10: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and understand appropriate applications and maintenance procedures for forcible entry tools.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify various cutting tools used in the fire service.
    2. Identify fire service prying tools.
    3. Identify fire service pushing/pulling tools.
    4. Identify striking tools.
    5. Match selected forcible entry tools to their basic applications.
    6. Identify tools used for through-the-lock forcible entry.
    7. Demonstrate through-the-lock forcible entry techniques.
    8. Demonstrate breaking a door lock.
    9. Identify tools for breaking padlocks.
    10. Demonstrate breaking a padlock.
    11. List forcible entry tool safety rules.
    12. Describe correct methods for carrying forcible entry tools.
    13. List general care and maintenance practices for forcible entry tools.
    14. Identify types of wood swinging doors and jambs.
    15. Match metal swinging doors to their descriptions.
    16. Identify types of sliding, revolving, and overhead doors.
    17. Select facts about fire doors.
    18. Identify locks and locking devices.
    19. Complete safety rules for breaking glass.
    20. Demonstrate properly breaking ordinary and tempered glass.
    21. Select facts about forcing swinging, sliding, revolving, and overhead doors.
    22. Demonstrate forcing doors of various mounts.
    23. Describe ways of gaining access past fences.
    24. Identify types of windows.
    25. Select facts about forcing windows and screened and barred openings.
    26. Demonstrate forcing various types of windows.
    27. Select facts about opening floors and walls.

    Outcome 11: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify, carry, raise, climb, inspect, and maintain fire service ground ladders.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Label the parts of a fire service ladder.
    2. Identify types of fire service ground ladders.
    3. Discuss materials used for fire service ladder construction.
    4. Demonstrate cleaning and inspecting a ladder.
    5. Summarize factors that contribute to safe ladder operation.
    6. Select facts about choosing the proper ladder for the job required.
    7. Demonstrate various ladder lifts and carries.
    8. Select facts about ground ladder placement.
    9. Demonstrate properly securing a raised ground ladder.
    10. Demonstrate ladder raises from various carries.
    11. Properly climb and work from ground ladders, with and without a safety harness.
    12. Demonstrate assisting conscious and unconscious victims down ground ladders.

    Outcome 12: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to apply the principles of ventilation to appropriately ventilate a building.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Define ventilation.
    2. List considerations that affect the decision to ventilate.
    3. Discuss factors that are taken into account when deciding the need for ventilation.
    4. Identify signs of potential backdraft.
    5. Select and correct false statements about ventilation decisions.
    6. List life safety hazards that can affect firefighters and rescue workers in unventilated buildings.
    7. Select from a list building factors that aid the firefighter in determining whether to use vertical or horizontal ventilation.
    8. List special considerations associated with ventilating high rise buildings.
    9. List special considerations associated with ventilating windowless buildings and basements.
    10. Select from a list ways in which vertical fire extension occurs.
    11. List factors that have a bearing on the location and size of a ventilation opening.
    12. Select and determine safety precautions that should be observed when performing vertical ventilation.
    13. Identify roof construction designs.
    14. Identify existing roof openings that can be used for ventilation.
    15. Discuss the three basic types of roofs as they relate to ventilation operations.
    16. Demonstrate ventilating pitched and flat roofs.
    17. Describe ways in which horizontal fire extension occurs.
    18. List advantages and disadvantages of forced ventilation.
    19. Demonstrate mechanical positive- and negative-pressure ventilation.
    20. Demonstrate hydraulic ventilation.
    21. Demonstrate proper ventilation of a flat and pitched roof.

    Outcome 13: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the fundamentals of a water supply system and will be able to connect a fire department pumper to various water sources.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match to their correct definitions terms associated with water supply.
    2. List the four fundamental components of a modern water system.
    3. Explain methods of moving water from municipal water supply to distribution systems.
    4. Explain the function of a processing or treatment facility and tell what the fire department’s main concern is regarding these facilities.
    5. Label the parts of a water distribution system.
    6. State recommended water distribution system pipe sizes for residential, business and industrial, and long mains.
    7. Identify types of water main valves.
    8. List causes of friction loss in water mains.
    9. Distinguish between wet-barrel and dry-barrel fire hydrants.
    10. Demonstrate correctly opening and closing a fire hydrant.
    11. Demonstrate making hard-suction and soft-sleeve hydrant connections.
    12. Provide examples of alternative static water supply sources.
    13. Select facts about water shuttling and relay pumping.
    14. Deploy a portable water tank.
    15. Connect and place a hard-suction hose for drafting from a static water source.

    Outcome 14: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to manage fire hose and handle both charged and uncharged lines.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match terms associated with fire hose to their definitions.
    2. Match fire hose sizes and types as required by NFPA 1901 to their correct applications.
    3. Discuss general care and maintenance of fire hose and fire hose couplings.
    4. Select the proper nozzle and hose for given fire attack situations.
    5. Identify types of hose couplings.
    6. Inspect hose couplings and replace a hose gasket.
    7. Couple and uncouple hose.
    8. List general guidelines for loading hose.
    9. Identify hose loads and hose rolls.
    10. Match hose loads to their advantages and disadvantages.
    11. Load and unload hose to a fire pumper.
    12. Roll hose in a straight roll, one-person donut, two-person donut, twin donut, and self-locking twin donut roll.
    13. Distinguish among descriptions of hose lays.
    14. List basic safety guidelines for laying hose.
    15. List advantages and disadvantages of forward and reverse hose lays.
    16. Demonstrate making hydrant connections from forward and reverse hose lays.
    17. Identify various hose carries and drags.
    18. Demonstrate various hose carries and drags including an accordion shoulder carry, horseshoe carry, dragging a working line, street drag, advancing a line into a structure, up and down an interior stairway, an exterior stairway, advancing to a standpipe, through a window, and hoisting charged and uncharged hose lines.
    19. Describe types of fire hose damage and practices to prevent such damage.
    20. Demonstrate the proper inspection, cleaning, and storage of dry hose.

    Outcome 15: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and operate a given selection of nozzles and tips for water fire streams.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Select facts about the properties and extinguishing capabilities of water.
    2. List methods that are used with fire streams to reduce the heat from a fire and provide protection to firefighters and exposures.
    3. Describe friction loss and water hammer.
    4. List guidelines for reducing friction loss and preventing water hammer.
    5. List discharge rates for low volume, hand line, and master streams.
    6. Describe advantages and disadvantages associated with handling solid and fog streams.
    7. Select facts about water fire streams.
    8. Identify types of nozzles.
    9. Demonstrate the operation of various fire hose nozzles.
    10. Explain the operation of ball, slide, and rotary control nozzle valves.
    11. List areas to check when maintaining and cleaning nozzles.
    12. List discharge rates for low volume, hand line, and master streams.

    Outcome 16: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to perform basic operations at properties protected by automatic sprinklers.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Label the parts of a sprinkler head.
    2. Identify automatic sprinkler head release mechanisms.
    3. Describe pendant, upright, and sidewall sprinkler designs.
    4. Manually stop the flow of water from an open sprinkler head.
    5. Identify the main control valve on an automatic sprinkler system.
    6. Identify sprinkler system control valves.
    7. Demonstrate the operation of a sprinkler system control valve.
    8. Select facts about a sprinkler system’s fire department connection.
    9. Demonstrate connecting a hose line from a fire pumper to a sprinkler system fire department connection.
    10. Select facts about guidelines for operations at sprinkler-protected properties.

    Outcome 17: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to safely and efficiently perform salvage and overhaul at a fire scene while protecting evidence for fire cause determination.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Explain the philosophy of loss control.
    2. Describe planning and procedures for salvage operations.
    3. Describe salvage covers, salvage cover maintenance, and equipment used in salvage operations.
    4. Summarize basic principles of salvage cover deployment.
    5. Demonstrate folding and rolling salvage covers.
    6. Demonstrate the spreading of salvage covers from various folds and rolls.
    7. Clean and inspect salvage covers.
    8. Construct and splice water chutes.
    9. Construct a catchall.
    10. Cover or close a building opening using salvage covers.
    11. Match to their correct uses tools and equipment used in overhaul.
    12. Select facts about overhaul safety.
    13. List four basic methods of detecting hidden fires.
    14. Select from a list indicators of hidden fires.
    15. Demonstrate the use of a thermal imaging camera (TIC).
    16. Select facts about preserving and protecting evidence during overhaul.
    17. Provide examples of information that should be noted/recorded on arrival at the fire scene related to fire cause determination.
    18. Provide examples of information that should be noted/recorded during firefighting.

    Outcome 18: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and properly use various fire service communications systems and equipment.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe communication responsibilities of the firefighter.
    2. Describe basic communications equipment used in telecommunications centers.
    3. Summarize necessary skills for fire department communications.
    4. Explain how a firefighter should proceed when receiving emergency calls from the public.
    5. Demonstrate handling business calls and reports of emergencies.
    6. Describe types of public alerting systems.
    7. Describe procedures that the public should use to report a fire or other emergency.
    8. Discuss ways of alerting fire department personnel to emergencies.
    9. Summarize guidelines for radio communications.
    10. Role play transmittng arrival and progress reports based on scenario information.
    11. Discuss calls for additional resources and emergency radio traffic.

    Outcome 19: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify residential fire hazards, and conduct a residential fire safety survey.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Define the terms fire safety survey, fire safety inspection, and residential fire safety survey.
    2. List types of fuel hazards and heat source hazards.
    3. Distinguish among common fire hazards, special fire hazards, personal fire hazards, and target hazards.
    4. List the main objectives of a residential fire safety survey.
    5. List the most common causes of residential fires.
    6. Describe aspects to check for interior and outside residential survey concerns.
    7. Conduct a residential fire safety survey.
    8. Discuss the main parts of a fire and life safety presentation.
    9. Select facts about fire and life safety presentation topics.
    10. Make and document a fire and life safety presentation.

    Outcome 20: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify basic knowledge of federal and state laws, rules, and consensus standards considered essential to the operations of Michigan fire departments and fire department personnel.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Define Law, Administrative Rule, and Standard.
    2. Identify federal and state agencies including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Consumer and Industry Services, and Occupational Health Division.
    3. Identify the Michigan Department of Consumer and Industry Services Emergency Medical Service Division.
    4. Identify the Michigan Office of Firefighter Training.
    5. Identify the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) Health and Safety Standard 1500.
    6. Identify the Michigan Occupational Safety and Health Administration Firefighting Safety Rule, Part 74.
    7. Explain the powers and duties related to the Michigan Public Act 207 of the Public Acts of 1941 also known as the “Michigan Fire Prevention Code.
    8. Identify duties and responsibilities of drivers of emergency vehicles as addressed in Michigan Public Act 300, the Michigan Vehicle Code.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    TOPIC UNIT CLASS HOURS PRACTICAL HOURS
    Course Introduction 1 .5 0.0
    Orientation 1 2.5 0.0
    Safety 2 6.0 0.0
    Fire Behavior 3 3.5 0.0
    Building Construction 4 8.0 0.0
    Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) 5 4.0 4.0
    Self Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA) 5 8.0 8.0
    Portable Extinguishers 6 4.0 4.0
    Ropes and Knots 7 8.0 8.0
    Rescue and Extrication 8 6.0 10.0
    Forcible Entry Tools 9 3.0 3.0
    Forcible Entry Construction and Techniques 9 4.5 10.0
    Ground Ladders 10 4.0 10.0
    Ventilation 11 10.0 10.0
    Water Supply 12 3.0 3.5
    Coupling, Loading, and Rolling Hose 13 4.0 4.0
    Laying, Carrying, and Advancing Hose 13 4.0 8.0
    Water Fire Streams 14 4.0 12.0
    Fire Control 15 7.0 1.0
    Fire Detection, Alarm and Suppression Systems 16 2.0 2.0
    Salvage, Overhaul, and Protecting Evidence of Fire Cause 17 4.5 2.5
    Fire Prevention and Public Education 18 4.0 1.5
    Fire Department Communications Equipment and Techniques 18 3.5 1.5

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    FIRE 2010 - Basic Fire Academy-Firefighter 2

    Credit Hours: 6.00


    Prerequisites: FIRE 2000  and consent of department

    FIRE‑2010 is for students who are currently employed by a fire department recognized by the Michigan Fire Marshall, are currently seeking employment, and/or are a volunteer in a recognized fire district. This course deals with advanced fire suppression techniques, including prevention procedure and skill development. This course meets the State‑mandated requirements for preparing students to take the exam for State certification for entry‑level or on‑call or volunteer firefighters.

    Billable Contact Hours: 9

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to implement the Incident Management System and transfer command for emergency operations.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. List questions that first arriving personnel should answer.
    2. Demonstrate the organization of an Incident Management System (IMS) until command is transferred.
    3. Select facts related to the transfer of command.
    4. List information that is included in a situation status report.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to function within an assigned role within an IMS.
    6. List aspects of response resources that should be tracked within the IMS.
    7. Demonstrate the ability to assume command and transfer command within an IMS.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify the effects of fire and fire suppression activities on structures and demonstrate actions to take when imminent building collapse is suspected.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Complete statements about the effects of fire and fire suppression activities on selected building materials.
    2. List signs of structural instability and potential building collapse.
    3. Describe ways in which fire suppression activities may create dangerous building conditions.
    4. Distinguish developing hazardous building or fire conditions.
    5. List actions to take when imminent building collapse is suspected.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and safely use various rescue and extrication tools.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match facts about extrication equipment power plants to the equipment to which they apply.
    2. List the two types of lighting commonly used to support emergency operations.
    3. Complete statements regarding the care and use of auxiliary electrical equipment.
    4. Demonstrate safely setting up and operating fire service lighting equipment.
    5. Service and maintain portable power plants and associated lighting equipment.
    6. Demonstrate the safe use of hydraulic rescue and extrication tools for vehicle extrication.
    7. List jacking and cribbing safety guidelines.
    8. Demonstrate the use of manual jacks and cribbing safely.
    9. List pneumatic tool safety guidelines.
    10. List winch safety guidelines.
    11. Demonstrate the use of a truck mounted winch.
    12. Demonstrate the use of a come-along.
    13. Complete air lifting bag safety guidelines.
    14. Demonstrate the use of air lifting bags.
    15. Select correct rescue and extrication tools for specific situations.
    16. Demonstrate the use of various saws including the reciprocating saw, and rotary saw.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to assist a rescue operation team, work as a member of a team to extricate a victim trapped in a motor vehicle, and perform special rescue operations.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. List considerations to be made when sizing up a vehicle accident.
    2. List concerns of rescuers who assess the situation at automobile accidents.
    3. State the purpose of vehicle stabilization.
    4. List methods of gaining access to victims in vehicles.
    5. List complications of extrication efforts as a result of passenger restraint and protection systems.
    6. Select facts about disentanglement and patient management.
    7. State the purpose of patient packaging.
    8. Distinguish between laminated glass and tempered glass.
    9. Select the correct method for removing vehicle glass.
    10. Demonstrate removing automotive window glass.
    11. Match vehicle roof posts to their letter designations.
    12. Demonstrate the removal of vehicle doors.
    13. Move or remove vehicle roofs.
    14. Remove steering wheels and columns.
    15. Displace dashboards.
    16. Match types of building collapse to their descriptions.
    17. List the two types of hazards associated with structural collapse rescue operations.
    18. Distinguish between shoring and tunneling.
    19. Select facts about trench rescue operations.
    20. State the role of the fire department in cave and tunnel rescue operations.
    21. Select facts about rescue operations involving electricity.
    22. Distinguish between rescues and recoveries.
    23. Describe the methods for performing a water rescue.
    24. Describe the methods for performing an ice rescue.
    25. List factors that should be taken into account during industrial extrications.
    26. Select facts about elevator and escalator rescues.
    27. Demonstrate water rescue using a throw bag and life ring.
    28. Demonstrate donning a water/ice rescue immersion suit.
    29. Demonstrate a water or ice rescue of a victim while wearing a rescue immersion suit.
    30. Demonstrate back boarding and packaging a cervical spine injury victim while in water.
    31. Demonstrate survival techniques used should water immersion occur while wearing full firefighting turnout protective clothing.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to safely work as part of a rescue team during confined space operations.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. List confined space hazards.
    2. List means of controlling confined space hazards.
    3. Assess a confined space scene for safety.
    4. Express the responsibilities of the entrant and attendant.
    5. Demonstrate entrant and attendant responsibilities as part of a rescue team.
    6. Access, deploy, and use equipment necessary for confined space rescue including a confined space tripod, hand operated winch, and supplied air breathing system.
    7. Demonstrate correctly the donning of a Class III confined space harness.
    8. Construct a mainline and rope anchor system.
    9. Construct a belay line rope system.
    10. Calculate various mechanical advantages.
    11. Employ a 3 to 1, 4 to 1, and 5 to 1 mechanical advantage system using the appropriate rope and pulleys.
    12. Package a patient for confined space rescue using a Sked extrication device and a LSP Halfback extrication device.
    13. Demonstrate rescue of a victim while operating within a structured incident management system.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to safely work as part of a rescue team in hazardous materials operations.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify hazardous materials and the risks associated with them in a hazardous materials incident.
    2. Identify the first responder’s limitations in training and skills required for response to a hazardous materials incident.
    3. Summarize Awareness Level and Operations Level responsibilities at hazardous materials Incidents.
    4. Identify types and locations of hazardous materials in the community.
    5. Identify hazardous materials by using the U.S. Department of Transportation placarding and labeling system.
    6. Utilize the North American Emergency Response Guidebook to reference information to aid in the handling of hazardous materials incidents.
    7. Identify common resource organizations available to the first responder.
    8. Demonstrate the use of rail consists, bills of lading, dangerous cargo manifests, air bills, and material safety data sheets (MSDS), to aid in identifying hazardous materials and their properties.
    9. Identify the types of locations that may become targets for criminal or terrorist activity using hazardous materials.
    10. Identify indicators of possible criminal or terrorist activity involving hazardous materials.
    11. Identify specific actions necessary when an incident is suspected to involve criminal or terrorist activity.
    12. Describe various chemical and physical properties and chemical reactions.
    13. Define the following terms: acid, base, reactivity, oxidizer, volatility, boiling point, flash point, corrosive, flammability, density, specific gravity, vapor density, viscosity, miscibility, Alpha, Beta, & Gamma radiation.
    14. Describe the proper protective actions for radiation incidents.
    15. Given a pesticide label, explain the significance of: the name of the pesticide, signal word, EPA registration number, precautionary statement, hazard statement, and active ingredient.
    16. Define medical surveillance.
    17. Identify elements of medical surveillance.
    18. Cite the OSHA standard requiring medical surveillance.
    19. Describe NFPA levels of protection and EPA levels of protection.
    20. Explain each EPA level of protection.
    21. Cite the conditions requiring each level of protection.
    22. Provide several limitations to chemical protective clothing.
    23. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of materials used for chemical protective clothing.
    24. Define permeation, degradation, and penetration.
    25. Select the proper personal protective equipment for a defensive response to a hazardous materials incident.
    26. List at least three ways of obtaining information about specific hazardous materials.
    27. Demonstrate gathering information from various hazardous materials resource books.
    28. Demonstrate calling for assistance in a hazardous materials incident.
    29. Define decontamination.
    30. Describe the seven points of consideration to decontamination planning.
    31. Identify various types of contaminants.
    32. List four general methods of decontamination.
    33. Describe the difference between physical and chemical removal of contaminants.
    34. Describe possible hazards associated with decontamination.
    35. Demonstrate the assembly of a decontamination line.
    36. Perform dry decontamination.
    37. Perform emergency decontamination.
    38. Describe the procedures for the disposal of contaminants.
    39. Define confinement, and containment.
    40. Describe the limitations of personnel trained at the Operational Level for Hazardous Materials.
    41. Describe methods and procedures for the following: Isolation of a container, confinement of land releases, confinement of air releases, and confinement of water releases.
    42. Describe procedures for an evacuation.
    43. Determine the source and size of a leak.
    44. Describe procedures for bonding and the transferring of materials.
    45. Describe the information that must be obtained in the size up of a hazardous materials incident.
    46. Predict the behavior of a material and its container.
    47. Estimate the potential harm at a hazardous materials incident.
    48. Describe the three work zones and the primary activities within each zone: Hot, Warn, and Clean.
    49. Describe the U.S. military mission-oriented posture (MOPP) ensembles.
    50. Explain how the General Hazardous Materials Behavior Model (GEBMO) can help firefighters understand the likely course of an incident

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate the skills and abilities to facilitate a self-rescue and to take an active roll in the rescue of other fire fighters in need.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe the three different styles of life safety harnesses.
    2. Demonstrate the proper application of the Munter Hitch.
    3. Demonstrate the proper technique to egress a hostile environment using a Munter hitch, rope, hand tool and SCBA.
    4. Demonstrate two types of ladder egress from a hostile environment.
    5. Demonstrate basic rope rappelling technique with and without wearing an SCBA under the direct supervision of a Rope Rescue Technician level trained instructor.
    6. Describe two wall-breach techniques used to escape a hostile environment while wearing an SCBA.
    7. Describe various search and removal techniques.
    8. Working in teams of two, demonstrate proficiency in locating, disentangling, and removing a trapped firefighter in a timely manner.
    9. Demonstrate the proper way to exit a building, using a hose line, upon being disoriented or lost.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to set up, climb, lock in using a ladder belt, and operate a mounted fire stream on a 100’ raised aerial platform.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the various elements of a raised aerial platform.
    2. Select facts about proper placement of aerial ladders.
    3. Describe the collapse zone as based on building size and height.
    4. Properly climb a raised 100’ aerial.
    5. Demonstrate locking into a raised 100’ aerial ladder using a ladder belt.
    6. Demonstrate proper operation of aerial mounted fire streams using various fire stream patterns.

    Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to test the operability of and flow from a fire hydrant.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match to their correct definitions terms associated with water flow and pressure.
    2. Select from a list conditions that reduce hydrant effectiveness.
    3. Demonstrate the proper measuring and recording of hydrant flow pressures.

    Outcome 10: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify and use hose tools, hose appliances, and service test hose.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify types of valves and valve devices.
    2. Match types of valves to their functions.
    3. Identify hose fitting appliances.
    4. Identify tools used with fire hose.
    5. Match hose appliances and tools to their uses in specific fireground situations.
    6. Select adapters and appliances for given fireground situations.
    7. Demonstrate the use of various hose tools and appliances.
    8. Select facts about service testing of hose.
    9. List safety guidelines for service testing of hose.
    10. Demonstrate the proper service testing of fire hose.

    Outcome 11: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to properly mix foam concentrate and assemble and operate a foam fire stream system.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe the methods by which foam prevents or controls a hazard.
    2. Classify flammable liquids as hydrocarbon or polar solvent fuels.
    3. Explain the process by which foam is generated.
    4. Describe the components of foam production.
    5. List factors that affect foam expansion.
    6. Classify foams by their expansion ratios.
    7. Distinguish between characteristics of Class A and Class B foams.
    8. List factors that affect Class B foam application rates.
    9. Select facts about foam proportioning.
    10. Match methods of proportioning to their descriptions.
    11. Select facts about foam proportioners.
    12. Demonstrate selecting the proper foams for given fire situations.
    13. Select the proper nozzles for specific foam situations.
    14. List reasons for poor foam generation.
    15. Match foam application methods with their uses.
    16. List types of hazards associated with foam use.
    17. Demonstrate the installation and proper use of an in-line foam educator.
    18. Demonstrate the operation of a high-expansion foam generator.

    Outcome 12: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to operate as part of a team to coordinate an interior attack and to control and/or extinguish ignitable liquid fires and flammable gas fires.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Distinguish between flammable liquids and combustible liquids.
    2. Select facts about suppressing Class B fires.
    3. Describe signs and effects of a Boiling Liquid Expanding Vapor Explosion (BLEVE).
    4. List the four ways that water can be used to attack a Class B fire.
    5. List methods of identifying tank components.
    6. Select facts about techniques for suppressing bulk transport vehicle fires.
    7. Demonstrate the use of water to control an ignitable liquid fire in an open pan or pit.
    8. Distinguish between the characteristics of natural gas and liquid petroleum gas.
    9. Control and/or extinguish a flammable gas cylinder fire.
    10. Determine actions to take, including retreat, when dealing with specific Class B fire conditions.

    Outcome 13: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to operate as part of a team to control and/or extinguish interior fires, exterior fires, and passenger vehicle fires.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe initial factors to consider when suppressing structure fires.
    2. Distinguish among direct, indirect, and combination attacks on Class A fires.
    3. Select facts about deploying and operating a master stream device.
    4. Demonstrate operating and deploying a master stream device.
    5. Describe actions and hazards associated with suppressing Class C fires.
    6. List safety guidelines for electrical emergencies.
    7. Select facts about Class D fire control.
    8. Discuss responsibilities of companies in structural fires.
    9. Control and/or extinguish a Class A fire within structure.
    10. List guidelines for controlling passenger vehicle fires.
    11. Identify hazards associated with controlling passenger vehicle fires.
    12. Attack a passenger vehicle fire.
    13. Extinguish a fire in a trash container.
    14. Select facts about fires and emergencies in confined spaces.
    15. Select facts about wildland fires.
    16. Describe the parts of a wildland fire.
    17. Summarize influences on wildland fire behavior: fuel, weather, and topography.
    18. List wildland protective clothing and equipment.
    19. Describe methods used to attack wildland fires.

    Outcome 14: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify components of and discuss the operation of typical fire detection and suppression systems.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Match types of alarm-initiating devices to their descriptions.
    2. Select facts about heat detectors.
    3. Select facts about smoke detectors.
    4. Complete statements about flame detectors.
    5. Complete statements about fire-gas detectors.
    6. State the reason for having a variety of alarm-indicating devices.
    7. Match types of automatic alarm systems to their descriptions.
    8. Identify components of fire suppression systems.

    Outcome 15: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to identify his or her responsibilities in fire cause determination and protect evidence of fire cause and origin.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe signs and indicators of an incendiary fire.
    2. Summarize important observations to be made in route, after arriving at the scene, and during firefighting operations.
    3. Discuss firefighter conduct and statements at the fire scene.
    4. Select facts about securing the scene and legal considerations.
    5. Discus protecting and preserving evidence.
    6. Demonstrate the protection of evidence of fire cause and origin.

    Outcome 16: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to complete a basic incident report and communicate the need for team assistance.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Select facts about making calls for additional response resources.
    2. List information that should be included in incident reports.
    3. Identify appropriate incident report codes.
    4. Proofread incident reports.
    5. Create incident reports.

    Outcome 17: Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to conduct a pre-incident survey working as a member of a team.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Provide examples of equipment required to conduct fire pre-incident surveys.
    2. List goals of pre-incident surveys.
    3. Provide examples of the types of information that a pre-incident survey can provide.
    4. Match standard map symbols to their correct meanings.
    5. Perform a pre-incident survey and complete related documentation.

    Outcome 18: Upon completion of this course, the student will have met the minimum standards for Firefighter II as outlined in NFPA 1001 for emergency medical care.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Demonstrate the use, decontamination, disinfecting, and disposal of personal protective equipment used for protection from infection.
    2. Perform Single-Rescuer Adult, Child, and Infant Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR).
    3. Perform Two-Rescuer Adult CPR.
    4. Demonstrate management of an obstructed airway in a conscious and unconscious adult.
    5. Demonstrate management of an obstructed airway in a conscious and unconscious child.
    6. Demonstrate management of an obstructed airway in a conscious and unconscious infant.
    7. Demonstrate the use of a resuscitation mask in the performance of single and two-rescuer CPR.
    8. Demonstrate a primary survey for life-threatening injuries.
    9. Differentiate between arterial, venous, and capillary bleeding.
    10. Demonstrate 3 procedures for controlling external bleeding.
    11. Identify characteristics and emergency medical care of thermal burns according to degree and severity.
    12. Identify characteristics and emergency medical care for chemical burns of the eye.
    13. Identify the symptoms and demonstrate emergency medical care of traumatic shock.
    14. Identify the symptoms and demonstrate emergency medical care for poisons and drug overdoses.
    15. Identify the method of contacting the poison control center that serves the local jurisdiction.
    16. Describe laws that relate to infection control.
    17. Describe actions required when responding to scenes involving violent or dangerous situations.
    18. Describe the physiological aspects of stress and types of stress reactions.
    19. Discuss the circulatory system.
    20. Describe types of shock.
    21. Describe the signs of shock.
    22. Describe the steps for managing shock.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    TOPIC UNIT CLASS HOURS PRACTICAL HOURS
    Course Introduc tion 1 .5 0.0
    Laws, Administra tive Rules and Standards 1 4.0 0.0
    Implemen ting the Incident Management System (IMS) 1 3.0 1.0
    Construc tion Materials and Building Collapse 4 3.0 1.0
    Rescue and Extrica tion Tools 8 6.0 6.0
    Vehicle Extrica tion and Special Rescue 8 6.0 0.0
    Confined Space Opera tions CS   16.0 8.0
    Rapid Interven tion Team and Firefighter Self-Rescue RIT   8.0 8.0
    Aerial Ladder Opera tions 10 2.0 4.0
    Hydrant Flow and Water Systems 12 1.0 0.5
    Hose Tools and Appliances 13 2.5 2.0
    Foam Fire Streams 14 5.0 3.0
    Ignitable Liquid and Flammable Gas Fire Control 15 3.0 6.0
    Fire Detec tion, Alarm, and Suppression Systems 16 2.5 1.0
    Fire Cause and Origin 18 4.0 0.0
    Radio Communica tions and Incident Reports 19 2.0 2.0
    Pre-Incident Survey 20 2.0 2.0
    Emergency Medical Care 21 10.0 6.0
    Hazmat First Responder - Awareness 22 4.0 0.0
    Hazmat First Responder - Opera tions 23 20.0 8.0
    Fire Attack Advanced and Live Burn 15 4.0 20.0
    State Written and Prac tical Testing   4.0 10.0

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FIRE 2130 - Fire Hydraulics & Water Supply

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Hydrostatics and hydrokinetics, Bernoulli’s Theorem, Pascal’s Theorem, Venturi Action, Hazen‑Williams Formula, water distribution systems, pump velocity, discharge, friction loss, engine and nozzle pressures as they relate to the study of fire science. Concentration on theory followed by practical application to the fire service.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to define the physical and extinguishing properties of water.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the physical properties of water.
    2. Identify the extinguishment of fire by cooling.
    3. Identify the extinguishment of fire by smothering.
    4. Identify the extinguishment of fire by emulsification.
    5. Identify the extinguishment of fire by dilution
    6. Identify water additives.
    7. Identify the interaction between water and electricity.
    8. Identify the use of water on special hazards.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the types of water distribution systems and other water sources in the community.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify characteristics of private water supply systems.
    2. Identify and explain the four fundamental components of a modern water system.
    3. Identify the following parts of a water distribution system:
      1. Distributors.
      2. Primary feeders.
      3. Secondary feeders.
    4. Identify a:
      1. Dry barrel hydrant.
      2. Wet barrel hydrant.
    5. Define the following terms:
      1. Normal operating pressure.
      2. Residual pressure.
      3. Flow pressure.
    6. Identify the following types of water main valves:
      1. Indicating.
      2. Nonindicating.
      3. Post indicator.
      4. Outside screw and yoke.
    7. Identify how to evaluate the operational readiness of a water supply system.
    8. Identify the approximate discharge capacities of various pipe sizes.
    9. Identify water supply facilities as they apply to fire department operations.
    10. Identify the procedure for mapping auxiliary water supplies to supplement the normal water system.
    11. Demonstrate the capability to interpret available sewer and drainage maps.
    12. Identify incrustation, tuberculation, and sedimentation and their effects on carrying capacities of water mains.
    13. Identify three alternative emergency water supply sources.
    14. Identify the components of mobile water supply operations.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the capability to determine required fire flow and the ability to work with water utilities to develop a system adequate to meet projected community needs.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify hydrant construction, location, and spacing.
    2. Identify the factors that affect fire flow demands.
    3. Identify the required fire flow and recommend hydrant distribution for fire fighting operations for a housing development.
    4. Identify the fire flow requirements and hydrant distribution for a shopping center.
    5. Identify the fire flow requirements and recommend hydrant distribution for an industrial complex.
    6. Identify the NFPA recommended color code system for fire hydrants.
    7. Identify problems related to flows from dead-end water mains.
    8. Demonstrate the principles of friction loss as they relate to fireground operations.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the performance of routine tests, inspections, and servicing functions required to assure the operational status of fire department pumpers.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify all automotive gauges and demonstrate their usage.
    2. Identify the operating principles of single-stage and multiple stage centrifugal pumps.
    3. Identify the major components and trace the flow of water through single-stage and multiple-stage centrifugal pumps.
    4. Identify the percentages of rated capacity, related pressures, and the capacity in gallons per minute at the rated pressures a fire department pumper is designed to deliver.
    5. Demonstrate the ability to perform an annual service test for fire department pumpers.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify characteristics of fire streams.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. Identify the type, design, operation, nozzle pressure, and flow in gpm for proper operation of each.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to determine the correct pump pressures for the following fireground situations:
      1. Pump discharge pressures when the length and size of nozzle are given.
      2. Water flow in gpm when the diameter of the orifice and pressure at the orifice are given.
      3. Friction loss in the supply and attack lines, when the gpm flow is given.
      4. Friction loss in wyed lines when the size of the hose and flow are given .
      5. Friction loss in multiple lines when the size of the hose and gpm flow are given.
      6. An estimated remaining available volume from a hydrant while pumping a given volume.
    3. Demonstrate the ability to mentally calculate correct pump discharge pressure, gpm, friction loss, and nozzle pressure, using formulas specified by the instructor.
    4. Define the following methods of water application:
      1. Direct
      2. Indirect
      3. Combination

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Session and Topic:

    1. Introductions/Course Overview
    2. Principles of Fire Department Hydraulics (chapter 1)
    3. Water Tanks and Hose Capacity (chapter 2)
    4. Water Supply and Testing Procedures (chapter 3)
    5. Fire Streams (chapter 4)
    6. Discharge (chapter 5)
    7. Friction Loss Principles and Applications (chapter 6)
    8. Mid-Term Review
    9. Mid-Term Exam
    10. Required Pump Discharge Pressure (chapter 7)
    11. Unusual and Complex Problems (chapter 8)
    12. Pumping Capacity and Drafting Operations (chapter 9)
    13. Relay Operations (chapter 10)
    14. Fire Ground Hydraulics (chapter 11)
    15. Final Exam Review
    16. Final Exam

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FIRE 2140 - Fire Protection Systems

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (replaces but does not equate to FIRE 1280 and FIRE 1290)

    This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline current national trends and developments related to the fire service.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the term “fire”
    2. Define the term “tetrahedron”
    3. Identify two examples of each of the following energy heat sources:
      1. Chemical
      2. Mechanical
      3. Electrical
    4. Describe the following potential stages of fires:
      1. Pre-burning
      2. Initial burning
      3. Vigorous burning
      4. Interactive burning
      5. Remote burning
    5. Define the terms “flashover” and “flame over”
    6. Describe the three methods of heat transfer
    7. Describe the three physical states of matter in which fuels are commonly found
    8. Explain the hazard of finely divided fuels as they relate to the combustion process
    9. Define flash point and ignition temperature
    10. Describe the relationship of oxygen concentration in air including its effect on the combustion process
    11. Identify three products of combustion commonly found in structure fires that create life hazards
    12. Define the following units of heat measurement:
      1. British Thermal Unit (BTU)
      2. Fahrenheit (F) degrees
      3. Celsius (C) degrees
      4. Calorie (c)
      5. Kilowatt (kw)
      6. British Thermal Unit/seconds (BTU/sec)
      7. Watt (w) power
      8. Megawatt (mw)
      9. Joule
    13. Classify fire based on their descriptions
    14. Identify primary extinguishment methods for each fire class

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the general properties of flammable and combustible liquids.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the basic effects of temperature and pressure on flammable and combustible liquids
    2. Define flammable and explosive limits
    3. Define specific gravity and boiling point
    4. Define the basic classes of flammable and combustible liquids as defined by NFPA 30, Flammable and Combustible Liquids
    5. Identify the effect of pressure on the design, size, and contents of storage tanks and containers for flammable and combustible liquids
    6. Identify storage, handling, and use conditions of flammable and combustible liquids that are most conducive to the initiation, propagation, and spread of fire
    7. Identify how to abate the fire hazards associated with spills or leaks of flammable or combustible liquids

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use portable and fixed fire extinguishing systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Classify types of fires as they relate to the use of portable fire extinguishers
    2. Identify the appropriate extinguisher for the various types of portable extinguishers
    3. Identify how to evaluate the operational readiness of portable fire extinguishers
    4. Identify the capability of extinguishing agents including the proper method for agent application
    5. Identify code requirements and regulations relative to the distribution and location of portable fire extinguishers
    6. Identify portable fire extinguisher maintenance requirements and procedures
    7. Identify how to evaluate the testing and maintenance of portable fire extinguishers
    8. Identify fixed fire extinguishing systems
    9. Identify how to evaluate the operational readiness of fixed fire extinguishing systems
    10. Identify the capabilities of the extinguishing agent including the proper procedures for agent application in a fixed fire extinguishing system
    11. Evaluate the proper installation and testing of all types of fixed fire protection equipment

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline heat, smoke, and flame detection systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify heat, smoke, and flame detection systems and devices
    2. Identify how to evaluate the operational readiness of heat, smoke, and flame detection systems or devices
    3. Identify the proper installation locations of heat, smoke, and flame detection devices

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to classify fire alarm systems and devices.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify local alarm systems and devices.
    2. Identify how to evaluate the operational readiness of local fire alarm systems and devices.
    3. Identify the warning capability of local fire alarm systems and devices.
    4. Identify the operation of municipal fire alarm systems.
    5. Identify the interconnection between local and municipal fire alarm systems.
    6. Differentiate between residential, local, proprietary central station, and municipal fire alarm systems.
    7. Identify the proper installation locations of fire alarm systems components or devices.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the physical properties of water and the various means by which those properties make fire extinguishments possible.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the physical properties of water.
    2. Identify the extinguishing properties of water.
    3. Identify additives to improve the performance of water as an extinguishing agent.
    4. Identify the electrical conductivity hazards of water.
    5. Describe the use of water on special hazards.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to summarize the elements of a water supply system that fire departments use to deliver water for suppression.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the elements of water distribution systems.
    2. Identify the features of a hydrant system for fire protection.
    3. Identify the control valves for water distribution.
    4. Identify the basic elements of water storage facilities.
    5. Identify the basic features of an industrial fire pump.
    6. Test an existing water supply system.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply the essential aspects of automatic on-site water-based suppression systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the fundamentals of good sprinkler protection.
    2. Identify the basic elements of a standpipe system.
    3. Identify the types and components of water based sprinkler protection.
    4. Design a hydraulically calculated sprinkler system.
    5. Review sprinkler plans in accordance with National Fire Protection Standards.
    6. Identify deficiencies in plans submitted for approval to authorities having jurisdiction.

    Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the essential aspects of fire alarm systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the fundamentals of fire alarm systems.
    2. Identify the basic elements of fire alarm systems.
    3. Identify the types and components of fire alarm systems.
    4. Review fire alarm plans in accordance with National Fire Protection Standards.
    5. Identify deficiencies in plans submitted for approval to authorities having jurisdiction.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Introduction to Fire Protection Systems
      1. The Role Fire Protection Systems Play in Protecting the Life, Safety, and Welfare of the General Public and Firefighters
      2. Overview of the Different Types of Fire Protection Systems
      3. The Role of Codes & Standards in Fire Protection System Design
    2. Water Supply Systems for Fire Protection Systems
      1. Sources of Fire Protection Water Supply
      2. Distribution Networks
      3. Piping
      4. Hydrants
      5. Utility Company Interface with the Fire Department
    3. Water-Based Fire Suppression Systems
      1. Properties of Water
        1. Water as an Effective Extinguishing Agent
        2. How Water Extinguishes Fire
      2. Sprinkler Systems
        1. Types of Systems & Applications
        2. Types of Sprinklers & Applications
        3. Piping, Valves, Hangers & Alarm Devices
        4. Fire Department Operations in Buildings with Sprinkler Systems
      3. Residential Sprinkler Systems
      4. Standpipe Systems
      5. Foam Systems
      6. Water Mist Systems
      7. Fire Pumps
    4. Non-Water Based Sysems
      1. Carbon Dioxide Systems
        1. Applications
        2. Extinguishing Properties
        3. System Components
      2. Halogenated Systems
        1. Halon 1301 and the Environment
        2. Halon Alternatives
        3. Extinguishing Properties
        4. System Components
      3. Dry/Wet Chemical Extinguishing Systems
        1. Extinguishing Properties
        2. Applications
        3. UL 300
    5. Fire Alarm Systems
      1. Components
      2. Types of Fire Alarm Systems
      3. Detectors
        1. Smoke
        2. Heat
        3. Flame
      4. Audible/Visual Devices
      5. Alarm Monitoring
      6. Testing & Maintenance of Fire Alarm Systems
    6. Smoke Management Systems
      1. Hazards of Smoke
      2. Smoke Movement in Buildings
      3. Types of Smoke Management Systems
      4. Firefighter Operations in Buildings with Smoke Management Systems
    7. Portable Fire Extinguishers
      1. Types & Applications
      2. Selection
      3. Placement
      4. Maintenance
      5. Portable Fire Extinguisher Operations

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FIRE 2410 - Building Construction for Fire Protection

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Fundamental building construction and design; fire protection features, special considerations.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the use groups for occupancy, special or mixed uses, building limitations, and the types of construction.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the classification of all buildings and structures as to use groups.
    2. Identify special use and occupancy buildings or structures, such as covered malls and high rises.
    3. Identify height and area limitations of buildings, based on type of construction, use group, and allowable increases.
    4. Identify the five types of construction.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to define fire resistant materials and interior finish requirements.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify exterior walls.
    2. Identify fire separations and partitions.
    3. Identify fire and party walls.
    4. Identify columns and beams.
    5. Identify penetration protection.
    6. Identify interior finish and trim.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to define and identify BOCA National Building Code Requirements relating to fire protection systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Locate and apply the requirements of the BOCA National Building Code to determine when and where fire protection systems must be installed.
    2. Understand the principles of how a fire protection system functions.
    3. Identify fire alarm, fire protection, fire suppression, fire sprinkler, and fire standpipe systems.
    4. Understand why a fire protection system must conform to code criteria and referenced standards.
    5. Identify the requirements for the design, installation, and testing of fire protection systems.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to define and identify means of egress, emergency electrical systems, and mechanical system requirements.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Determine the occupant load for various buildings and use groups.
    2. Examine capacity of egress requirements.
    3. Determine the number, types, and locations of exits.
    4. Evaluate exit access corridors and arrangement of means of egress.
    5. Identify doors and hardware.
    6. Define emergency and standby power systems.
    7. Identify fire protection requirements in mechanical systems.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to given a set of construction documents, demonstrate code compliance for fire protection features, as specified in the BOCA National Building Code.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify building and planning requirements.
      1. Use and occupancy.
      2. Type of construction.
      3. Height.
      4. Minimum type of construction.
      5. Unlimited areas.
    2. Identify fire resistant materials and construction requirements.
    3. Identify fire protection requirements.
    4. Identify means of egress requirements.
    5. Identify site requirements.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Session and Topic:

    1. Introductions/Course Overview
    2. Introduction to Building Construction (chapter 1)
    3. Principles of Construction/Assign Article Review 1 (chapter 2)
    4. Trusses (chapter 1, 2)
    5. Wood Construction (chapter 3)
    6. Ordinary Construction (chapter 4)
    7. Garden Apartments and Strip Malls (chapter 5)
    8. Mid-Term Exam
    9. Principles of Fire Resistance (chapter 6)
    10. Assign Article Review 2 (chapter 7)
    11. Steel Construction (chapter 8)
    12. Concrete Construction (chapter 9)
    13. Fire Growth - Smoke and Fire Containment (chapter 10)
    14. Mid & High Rise Construction (chapter 11)
    15. Presentations
    16. Final Exam

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FIRE 2420 - Fire Investigation

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly FIRE 1180)

    Fundamentals of fire investigation; chemistry of fire and fire behavior; determining point of origin and ignition sources; properties of combustibles and residues of pyrolysis; recognition of arson evidence.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply terminology used by fire investigators.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define fire investigation terms with 90% accuracy.
    2. Use fire investigation terms in classroom discussions to the satisfaction of the instructor.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the basic method used to investigate a fire.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify the scientific method of investigation.
    2. Identify the six major steps of a fire investigation.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain fire behavior.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define the four components of a fire tetrahedron.
    2. Define the three methods of heat transfer.
    3. Define ignition.
    4. Define fuel load.
    5. Identify fire development.
    6. List the products of combustion.
    7. Identify fire pattern development.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to examine fire patterns.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define fire patterns.
    2. Identify movement patterns.
    3. Define wood char.
    4. Identify spalling.
    5. Define oxidation.
    6. Identify the melting of materials.
    7. Identify thermal expansion and deformation of materials.
    8. Define smoke and soot.
    9. Identify clean burn areas.
    10. Identify calcination.
    11. Identify the role of glass in a fire investigation.
    12. Identify the location of patterns.
    13. Identify pattern geometry.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline legal considerations relating to fire investigations.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define arson according to Michigan law.
    2. List and define the Michigan Arson Statutes
    3. List relevant factors to be considered prior to an arson investigation.
    4. Identify civil litigation, negligence, and product liability.
    5. Define expert testimony.
    6. Distinguish between administrative and criminal search warrants.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline basic considerations of concern to the investigator prior to the beginning of the incident scene investigation.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify basic incident information.
    2. List the basic functions that are commonly performed in each investigation.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline sources of information.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify the Freedom of Information Act.
    2. Describe the purpose of an interview.
    3. Identify governmental sources of information.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the recording of a scene.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify photographic preservation documentation of the fire scene.
    2. Identify photography techniques used during a fire investigation.
    3. Demonstrate notetaking techniques
    4. Create a fire investigation drawing according to nationally recognized standards.

    Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to examine and test physical evidence.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define physical evidence.
    2. Identify when to collect physical evidence.
    3. Define comparison or control samples.
    4. Preserve physical evidence.
    5. Identify methods of collection.
    6. Identify evidence containers.
    7. Identify physical evidence.
    8. Identify the chain of custody of physical evidence.
    9. Identify examination and testing of physical evidence.

    Outcome 10: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline safety requirements for fire investigators.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify the safety factor that should require at least two investigators at a fire scene.
    2. List the personal protective equipment needed at a fire scene.
    3. Identify fire scene hazards.
    4. Identify structural stability.
    5. Identify status of all utilities
    6. Identify the safety of the fire scene atmosphere.

    Outcome 11: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to assess the fire origin.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define fire origin.
    2. Identify fire damage assessment by notes, photography, vector, diagrams, and depth‐of‐char grid diagrams.
    3. Demonstrate a preliminary scene assessment.
    4. Demonstrate a preliminary scenario development.
    5. Demonstrate a detailed exterior surface examination.
    6. Demonstrate a detailed interior surface examination.
    7. Identify pre‐fire conditions.
    8. Demonstrate fire scene reconstruction.
    9. Identify fire‐spread scenario.
    10. Define a total burn.

    Outcome 12: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to assess the fire cause.

    Objectives: 

    1. Define cause determination.
    2. Identify an accidental fire cause.
    3. Identify a natural fire cause.
    4. Identify an incendiary fire cause.
    5. Identify an undetermined fire cause.
    6. Identify the source and form of heat ignition.
    7. Identify first material ignited.
    8. Identify ignition factor (cause).

    Outcome 13: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to classify explosions.

    Objectives: 

    1. Identify the types of explosions.
    2. Define BLEVEs.
    3. Identify the orders of explosions.
    4. Identify the effects of explosions.
    5. Identify factors controlling explosion effects.
    6. Identify seated, nonseated, gas/vapor, dust, and smoke explosions.
    7. Define explosives.
    8. Investigate the explosive scene.

    Outcome 14: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to determine the motivation of a fire setter.

    Objective: 

    1. Describe the fire scene conditions or situations.
    2. Assist in the identification of the plausible motive for a given fire. 
    3. List the common arson motives.

    Outcome 15: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to determine the cause of death based on information about the victim.

    Objective:

    1. Identify the type of information needed.
    2. Assess the fire victim’s condition.
    3. Collect evidence associated with fire victim.
    4. Consult with medical personnel.
    5. Follow best practices for gathering information.
    6. Document evidence.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    I. Emergency Responder Responsibilities and Observations

    1. Responsibilities of the Fire Department
    2. Responsibilities of the Firefighter
    3. Responsibilities of the Fire Officer
    4. Observations When Approaching the Scene
    5. Observations Upon Arrival
    6. Observations During Firefighting Operations
    7. Identification of Incendiary Devices

    II.Constitutional Law.

    1. Criminal Law
    2. Constitutional Amendments
    3. Case studies
      1. Michigan v. Tyler
      2. Michigan v.Clifford
      3. Daubert Decision
      4. Benfield Decision
      5. Kuhmo/Carmichael Decision

    III.Fire Investigations Terminology

    1. Terms as They Apply to Structural Fires
    2. Terms as They Apply to Vehicle Fires
    3. Other Common Investigative Terms

    IV. Basic Elements of Fire Dynamics

    1. Ignition
    2. Heat Transfer
    3. Flame Spread
    4. Burning Rate
    5. Fire Plumes
    6. Fire Analysis

    V. Building Construction

    1. Types of Construction
    2. Building Materials
    3. Building Components

    VII.Fire Protection Systems

    1. Extinguishment Systems
    2. Detection Systems
    3. Signaling Systems
    4. Other Building Services

    VIII.Basic Principles of Electricity

    1. Basic Electricity
    2. Wiring Systems
    3. Common Electrical Systems

    IX.Health and Safety

    1. Methods of Identification
    2. Common Causes of Accidents
    3. Common Causes of Injuries

    X. Fire Scene Investigations

    1. Examining the Fire Scene
    2. Securing the Fire Scene
    3. Documenting the Fire Scene
    4. Evidence Collection and Preservation
    5. Exterior Examination

    XI. Determining Point of Origin

    1. Interior Examination
    2. Area of Origin
    3. Fire Patterns
    4. Other Indicators
    5. Scene Reconstruction
    6. Point of Origin

    XII.Types of Fire Causes

    1. Accidental
    2. Natural
    3. Incendiary
    4. Undetermined

    XIII.Vehicle Fires

    1. Examination of Scene
    2. Examination of Exterior
    3. Examination of Driver and Passenger Areas
    4. Examination of Fuel System
    5. Examination of Electrical System

    XIV. Firesetters

    1. Characteristics of Arson
    2. Common Motives

    Primary Faculty
    Staelgraeve, Kenneth
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Lopez, Michael
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


French Language

  
  •  

    FREN 1460 - Elementary French 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly FREN 1260)

    This course is designed to introduce students to the French speaking world and French vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to express personal meaning on basic topics. Students will engage in these activities within contextualized cultural settings. The vocabulary and grammatical structures are integrated into interactive and communicative activities that emphasize all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in basic oral language skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in small conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker):
      1. Small talk (greetings, getting acquainted, information about origin and nationality)
      2. Courses, university and student life, leisure activities
      3. Describing people/personalities
      4. Describing feelings, likes, and dislikes
      5. Clothes and sizes, basic numbers
      6. Describing housing (rooms, apartments, houses)
      7. Time, seasons, dates, holidays
      8. Family relations
      9. Expressing possession
      10. Food, meals, eating habits

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use basic French vocabulary.

    Objectives: Regarding topics such as social interactions, school and school life, people/personalities, feelings, clothing, numbers, housing, time, date, seasons, family relations, and food and dining:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use basic grammar structures in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    1. Use articles (definite, indefinite, partitive) and nouns.
    2. Conjugate verbs in the present tense.
    3. Make affirmation and negation statements; ask questions.
    4. Use descriptive adjectives.
    5. Use the imperative tense.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of cultural areas of French culture.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some basic geographical, economical and cultural aspects such as different forms of address, student life and housing, national holidays and celebrations, and francophone family life.
    2. Identify how and when to use the different forms of address (informal - formal).
    3. Compare cultural differences.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Preliminary Chapter:

    1. Greetings
    2. Numbers from 0-20
    3. French Alphabet
    4. Accents
    5. Pronunciation
    6. General Introductory Vocabulary

    Chapter 1:

    1. Articles and Nouns: Identifying People and Things
    2. Plural Articles and Nouns: Expressing Quantity
    3. Verbs ending in -er
    4. Negation using ne…pas

    Chapter 2:

    1. The Verb être
    2. Descriptive Adjectives
    3. Yes/No Questions
    4. The Prepositions à and de

    Chapter 3:

    1. Verbs ending in -ir
    2. The Verb avoir
    3. Indefinite Articles in Negative Sentences
    4. Interrogative Expressions

    Chapter 4:

    1. Possessive Adjectives
    2. The Verb aller: Talking about Plans and Destinations
    3. The Verb faire: Expressing Doing and Making
    4. Verbs Ending in -re: Expressing Actions

    Chapter 5:

    1. The Verbs prendre and boire
    2. Partitive Articles
    3. The Imperative

    Primary Faculty
    Rahmouni El Idrissi, Amine
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FREN 1470 - Elementary French 2

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: FREN 1460  or two or more years of high school French

    (formerly FREN 1270)

    This course continues students’ development of French language and culture by building and expanding on the culture, vocabulary and language structures learned in FREN 1460. New language functions will be presented in meaningful activities that emphasize all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing and allow for further cultural exposure. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in oral language skills beyond Elementary French 1.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker):
      1. Food-related shopping possibilities, restaurants
      2. Numbers, money
      3. Expressing desire, ability, obligation
      4. Vacation, sports, geographical names
      5. Means of transportation
      6. Making polite requests
      7. New technology, communication, and media
      8. Describing the past
      9. Urban life

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use French vocabulary beyond Elementary French 1.

    Objectives: Regarding topics such as grocery shopping, restaurants, numbers and money, vacation, sports, geographic names, transportation, technology, communication, media, and urban life:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use grammar structures beyond Elementary French 1 in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    1. Use adjectives (demonstrative, interrogative, placement).
    2. Identify the difference between and conjugate the present perfect, and the simple past tenses.
    3. Conjugate some basic verb forms in the conditional.
    4. Use adverbs.
    5. Use pronouns.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of French culture beyond Elementary French 1.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some geographical, economical and cultural aspects of some French speaking countries and/or communities such as:
      1. French shopping habits
      2. Restaurant etiquette
      3. Québec
      4. Vacations in the Francophone world, tourism, French vacation habits
      5. Means of transportation in France and their usage
      6. French TV, telephone, and internet services
      7. Francophone Africa
      8. The structure of French cities
    2. Compare cultural differences.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Chapter 6: Demonstrative Adjectives

    1. The Verbs vouloir, pouvoir, and devoir
    2. The Interrogative Adjective quel
    3. The Placement of Adjectives

    Chapter 7: Verbs Conjugated Like dormir, venir

    1. The passé composé with avoir
    2. The passé composé with être
    3. Uses of depuis, pendant, and il y a

    Chapter 8: Introduction to the Present Conditional

    1. Prepositions with Geographical Names
    2. Affirmative and Negative Adverbs
    3. Affirmative and Negative Pronouns

    Chapter 9: The imparfait

    1. Direct Object Pronouns
    2. Indirect Object Pronouns
    3. The Verbs voir and croire

    Chapter 10: The passé composé Versus the imparfait

    1. The Pronouns y and en
    2. Savoir and connaître

    Primary Faculty
    Rahmouni El Idrissi, Amine
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FREN 2460 - Intermediate French 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: FREN 1470 

    (formerly FREN 2360)

    Third-semester French picks up where FREN 1470 has ended. The central goal is to advance the student’s communicative ability and cultural competency with an emphasis on assimilating the language for complex communicative purposes. New language functions will be presented in meaningful activities that emphasize all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing and empower further cultural exploration. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in oral language skills beyond Elementary French 2.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in small conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker):
      1. Art, literature, music.
      2. Love and marriage.
      3. The human body.
      4. Professions.
      5. Banking services, budget.
      6. Leisure activities.
      7. Environment.
      8. Expressing attitudes, wishes, necessity, emotion, doubt, uncertainty, and subjective viewpoints.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use French vocabulary beyond Elementary French 2.

    Objectives: Regarding topics such as art, literature, music, love and marriage, the human body, professions, banking services, budget, leisure activities, and the environment:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use grammar structures beyond Elementary French 2 in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    1. Use pronominal verbs.
    2. Use pronouns (stressed, double-object, relative, interrogative, indefinite).
    3. Conjugate the future tense and the conditional.
    4. Use adjectives, nouns, and adverbs; make comparisons.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of French culture beyond Elementary French 2.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some geographical, economical and cultural aspects of some French speaking countries and/or communities such as:
      1. French art, architecture, literature, music, and cultural patrimony.
      2. Medicine in France.
      3. North African culture.
      4. Work culture in France.
      5. West African immigration into the US.
      6. French leisure habits and preferences .
      7. Canadian winter sports.
      8. French political parties, European Union.
    2. Compare cultural differences.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Chapter 11:

    1. Stresses Pronouns
    2. Using Double Object Pronouns
    3. Prepositions after Verbs
    4. Adverbs

    Chapter 12:

    1. Pronominal Verbs
    2. Expressing Action
    3. Reporting Everyday Events
    4. Expressing Reciprocal Actions
    5. Talking about the Past and Giving Commands

    Chapter 13:

    1. The Future Tense
    2. Relative Pronouns
    3. Comparative and Superlative of Adjectives

    Chapter 14:

    1. Interrogative Pronouns
    2. The Present Conditional
    3. Adverbs and Nouns: Making Comparisons

    Chapter 15:

    1. Subjunctive Mood
    2. Expressing Attitudes
    3. Expressing Wishes, Necessity, and Possibility
    4. Expressing Emotion

    Primary Faculty
    Rahmouni El Idrissi, Amine
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    FREN 2470 - Intermediate French 2

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: FREN 2460 

    (formerly FREN 2370)

    This course will stress the expansion of the student’s vocabulary, language skills and cultural competency. Classroom activities will center on a thorough review of the most important aspects of French grammar, as well as active oral and written use of the language. The oral exercises will expose students to extended discourse and will develop content and context as appropriate for students moving from the intermediate to the more advanced proficiency levels. Authentic material will provide the student with opportunities to critically engage with elaborate cultural situations. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in oral language skills beyond Intermediate French 1.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in small conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker):
      1. Extending, accepting, and declining an invitation.
      2. Offering, soliciting a service, making acquisitions, and asking for prices.
      3. Using language related to university life, expressing uncertainties and frustrations, expressing relief after an exam.
      4. Talking about education, career and personal interests.
      5. Discussing trends and tastes in food recipes.
      6. Debating national and international economic issues.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use French vocabulary beyond Intermediate French 1.

    Objectives:

    Regarding topics such as education and careers, descriptions, technology, economy, business, social, and financial terms, entertainment, food and recipes, sports and outdoor activities:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use grammatical structures beyond Intermediate French 1 in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    Students will review grammatical structures, including:

    1. Conjugate and use the present, the present perfect, the ‘plus-que-parfait,’ and the simple past tenses.
    2. Use interrogative words and pronouns.
    3. Use negation.
    4. Use direct and indirect pronouns, ‘y’ and ‘en,’ accentuated pronouns and the sequential order of pronouns.
    5. Identify the place of adjectives.
    6. Use adverbs.
    7. Use the comparative and superlative.
    8. Use the partitive article.
    9. Use the infinitive, subjunctive, and imperative.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of French culture beyond Elementary French 2.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some geographical, economical and cultural aspects of some French speaking countries and/or communities such as health systems, hospitals, hotels classification, and personal identifications.
    2. Examine media of French-speaking countries (literature, visual art, music and songs, and/or cinema).
    3. Compare cultural differences.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to critically discuss, in French, literary and/or journalistic works read in French.

    Objectives:

    1. Convey desired message.
    2. Analyze the meaning of the work.
    3. Support ideas conveyed using examples from the work.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Introductory Chapter:

    1. Identity:
      1. Who are you?
      2. Describing family and friends
      3. Review of the French alphabet and accents

    Chapter 1:

    1. Communicative goals
      1. Asking for information
      2. Explaining where something is located
    2. Grammar
      1. Present tense
      2. Negation
      3. The use of depuis
      4. Review of interrogative words and pronouns
      5. The difference between lequel and quel
    3. Culture
      1. Paris
      2. Paul Verlaine
      3. Sempé/Goscinny: Le petit Nicolas

    Chapter 2:

    1. Communicative goals
      1. Find out what has happened
      2. Determine circumstances
    2. Grammar
      1. Verbs like ouvrir
      2. Forms of the passé composé
      3. Forms of the imparfait
      4. The juxtaposition of the two past tenses
      5. The plus-que-parfait
    3. Culture
      1. Canada and Québec
      2. Jacques Prévert
      3. Roch Carrier: “Grand-père n’avait peur de rien ni de personne”

    Chapter 3:

    1. Communicative goals
      1. Taking a decision
      2. Convincing people
    2. Grammar
      1. Verbs like voir, envoyer, manquer
      2. Direct and indirect object pronouns
      3. The pronouns y and en
      4. The order of accentuated pronouns
    3. Culture
      1. Papeete and Tahiti
      2. Charles Baudelaire
      3. Roseline Lefèvre: “L a perle et l’océan indien”
      4. Victor Segalen: “La loi nouvelle”

    Chapter 4:

    1. Communicative goals
      1. Describing people
      2. Ordering a meal
      3. Reading a menu
    2. Grammar
      1. Verbs like courir and recevoir
      2. The place of the adjective
      3. Adverbs
      4. The comparative
      5. The superlative
      6. The partitive article
    3. Culture
      1. Lyon and France
      2. Marie-Noëlle Toutain: “Ecoute-moi me taire”
      3. Nathalie Sarraute: “Le mercredi après-midi”

    Chapter 5:

    1. Communicative goals
      1. Asking for opinions and advice
      2. Giving advice and making suggestions
    2. Grammar
      1. Verbs like falloir, valoir, pleuvoir
      2. The infinitive
      3. The present participle
      4. The imperative
      5. The subjunctive
    3. Culture
      1. Relationship between Le Maghreb and France
      2. Francis Bebey: “Je suis venu chercher du travail”
      3. Fernand Reynaud: “Je suis pas un imbécile”
      4. Fatima Gallaire: “Les co-épouses”

    Primary Faculty
    Rahmouni El Idrissi, Amine
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


GEN ED

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group I (AA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Arts General Education Group I Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (from one option)

    Option 1: ENGL 1210  or ENGL 1180 , and ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190  

    Option 2: ENGL 1210  or ENGL 1180 , and one of the following: SPCH 1060 SPCH 1200 , SPCH 2100 , SPCH 2110 , SPCH 2300 , SPCH 2550 , or SPCH 2800  

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group I (AS)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Science General Education Group I Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (from one option)

    Option 1: ENGL 1210  or ENGL 1180 , and ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190  

    Option 2: ENGL 1210  or ENGL 1180 , and one of the following: SPCH 1060 , SPCH 1200 , SPCH 2100 , SPCH 2110 , SPCH 2300 , SPCH 2550 , or SPCH 2800  

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group I.A (AAS, ABA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Applied Science & Associate of Business Administration General Education Group I.A Requirements:

    Take one (1) course:

    ENGL 1180   (4.0 credit hours) or ENGL 1210   (3.0 credit hours)

     

    Note: If students take one course from each of Groups I.A, II, III, and IV and still have taken less than the minimum of 15 credit hours of General Education courses required for the AAS & ABA degrees, they may elect additional hours from Group I.B, II, III, or IV to satisfy minimum degree requirements.
     

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

      


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group I.B (AAS, ABA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Applied Science & Associate of Business Administration General Education Group I.B:

    English Composition (except ENGL 1180 or ENGL 1210), Reading, or Speech

     

    Note: If students take one course from each of Groups I.A, II, III, and IV and still have taken less than the minimum of 15 credit hours of General Education courses required for the AAS & ABA degrees, they may elect additional hours from Group I.B, II, III, or IV to satisfy minimum degree requirements.

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

       


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group II (AA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Arts General Education Group II Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (two different subject matters)

    Arab (ARAB), ARTT 1620 ARTT 1625 ARTT 2650 ARTT 2660 , Chinese (CHIN), ENGL 1730 ENGL 2410 ENGL 2420 ENGL 2510 ENGL 2600 ENGL 2610 ENGL 2640 ENGL 2710 ENGL 2720 ENGL 2730 ENGL 2740 ENGL 2800 ENGL 2810 ENGL 2850 , French (FREN), German (GRMN), Humanities (HUMN), INTL 2000 INTL 2300 INTL 2800 , Italian (ITAL), MUSC 1030 MUSC 1040 MUSC 1050 MUSC 1060 MUSC 1070 MUSC 1160 MUSC 1170 MUSC 2080 MUSC 2180 MUSC 2710 MUSC 2720 ,  Philosophy (PHIL), or Spanish (SPAN)

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group II (AAS, ABA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Applied Science & Associate of Business Administration General Education Group II Requirements:

    Take one (1) course from any of the following:

    Astronomy, Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, Environmental Science, Geology, Mathematics (1000 or above), Physical Science or Physics

     

    Note: If students take one course from each of Groups I.A, II, III, and IV and still have taken less than the minimum of 15 credit hours of General Education courses required for the AAS & ABA degrees, they may elect additional hours from Group I.B, II, III, or IV to satisfy minimum degree requirements.
     

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

       


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group II (AS)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Science General Education Group II Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (two different subject matters)

    Arab (ARAB), ARTT 1620 , ARTT 1625 ARTT 2650 ARTT 2660 , Chinese (CHIN), ENGL 1730 ENGL 2410 ENGL 2420 ENGL 2510 ENGL 2600 ENGL 2610 ENGL 2640 ENGL 2710 ENGL 2720 ENGL 2730 ENGL 2740 ENGL 2800 ENGL 2810 ENGL 2850 , French (FREN), German (GRMN), Humanities (HUMN), INTL 2000 INTL 2300 INTL 2800 , Italian (ITAL), MUSC 1030 MUSC 1040 MUSC 1050 MUSC 1060 MUSC 1070 MUSC 1160 MUSC 1170 MUSC 2080 MUSC 2180 MUSC 2710 MUSC 2720 , Philosophy (PHIL), or Spanish (SPAN)  

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group III (AA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Arts General Education Group III Requirements:

    Take one (1) course

    MATH 1100 , MATH 1340 , MATH 1360 , MATH 1370 , MATH 1415 , MATH 1435 , MATH 1465 , MATH 1760 , MATH 1770 , MATH 2000 , MATH 2200 , MATH 2760 , or MATH 2770  

     

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group III (AAS, ABA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Applied Science & Associate of Business Administration General Education Group III Requirements:

    Take one (1) course from any of the following:

    Anthropology, Economics, Geography, History, INTL 2010, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology

     

    Note: If students take one course from each of Groups I.A, II, III, and IV and still have taken less than the minimum of 15 credit hours of General Education courses required for the AAS & ABA degrees, they may elect additional hours from Group I.B, II, III, or IV to satisfy minimum degree requirements.
     

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

       


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group III (AS)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Science General Education Group III Requirements:

    Take one (1) course

    MATH 1340 MATH 1415 MATH 1435 MATH 1465 , or MATH 1760  

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group IV (AA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Arts General Education Group IV Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (two different subject matters, one must be with a lab which is indicated by (L) after the course code)

    Astronomy (ASTR), BIOL 1000 (L), BIOL 1010 (L), BIOL 1310 (L), BIOL 1400 , BIOL 2400 (L), BIOL 2710 (L), BIOL 2730 (L), CHEM 1000 (L), CHEM 1050 (L), CHEM 1060 (L), CHEM 1170 (L), CHEM 1180 (L), CHEM 2260 , CHEM 2270 (L), CHEM 2280 , ENVS 1050 , ESCI 1210 (L), GEOL 1080 , GEOL 1140 (L), GEOL 1150 (L), PHSA 1050 (L), PHYS 1180 (L), PHYS 1190 (L), PHYS 2220 (L), or PHYS 2230 (L)

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group IV (AAS, ABA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Applied Science & Associate of Business Administration General Education Group IV Requirements:

    Take one (1) course from any of the following:

    Art, Creative Writing, Foreign Language, Humanities, INTL 2000 INTL 2300 INTL 2800 ,  Literature, Music, Philosophy, or WHES (2000 or above)

     

    Note: If students take one course from each of Groups I.A, II, III, and IV and still have taken less than the minimum of 15 credit hours of General Education courses required for the AAS & ABA degrees, they may elect additional hours from Group I.B, II, III, or IV to satisfy minimum degree requirements.

     

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

       


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group IV (AS)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Science General Education Group IV Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (two different subject matters, one must be with a lab which is indicated by (L) after the course code)

    Astronomy (ASTR), BIOL 1000 (L), BIOL 1010 (L), BIOL 1310 (L), BIOL 1400 BIOL 2400 (L), BIOL 2710 (L), BIOL 2730 (L), CHEM 1000 (L), CHEM 1050 (L), CHEM 1060 (L), CHEM 1170 (L), CHEM 1180 (L), CHEM 2260 CHEM 2270 (L), CHEM 2280 ENVS 1050 ESCI 1210 (L), GEOL 1080 GEOL 1140 (L), GEOL 1150 (L), PHSA 1050 (L), PHYS 1180 (L), PHYS 1190 (L), PHYS 2220 (L), or PHYS 2230 (L)

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group V (AA)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Arts General Education Group V Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (two different subject matters)

    Anthropology (ANTH), Economics (ECON), Geography (GEOG), History (HIST), INTL 2010 , Political Science (POLS), Psychology (PSYC), or Sociology (SOCY)

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEN ED - Group V (AS)

    Credit Hours: Variable


    Associate of Science General Education Group V Requirements:

    Take two (2) courses (two different subject matters)

    Anthropology (ANTH), Economics (ECON), Geography (GEOG), History (HIST), INTL 2010 , Political Science (POLS), Psychology (PSYC), or Sociology (SOCY)

    Billable Contact Hours: NA

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Primary Faculty

    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean

    Dean




    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 1100 - Principles of Geography

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Geographic principles underlying the patterns of man’s activity on earth’s surface. Systematic geography.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the spatial organization of the Earth’s surface.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the core concepts of geography.
    2. Explain the themes of geographic study.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use the tools of geography.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the role of globes.
    2. Explain mapping properties.
    3. Identify types of maps.
    4. Describe the role of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in geographic representations.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the physical processes that create the spatial distributions of landforms on the earth’s surface.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the earth-sun relationship.
    2. Describe how weather and climate patterns form.
    3. Compare tectonic and gradational forces.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the impact of human activities.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe how population patterns form.
    2. Explain the Demographic Equation.
    3. Describe the interaction of humans with their environment.
    4. Describe how cultures diffuse.
    5. Identify geopolitical systems.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the patterns that govern the location of economic activity.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the classifications of economic activity and land use.
    2. Identify the environmental impacts of land use.

    Outcome 6:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use geographic concepts.

    Objectives:

    1. Interpret and describe the past.
    2. Identify potential problems.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Geographic Concepts
      1. Definition
      2. Evolution of the discipline
      3. Core concepts
    2. Maps
      1. Location, direction, distance
      2. Size, scale
      3. Map types
      4. GIS
    3. Physical Geography
      1. Landforms
      2. Weather and climate
      3. Natural resources
    4. Human Geography
      1. Population
      2. Culture
      3. Spatial interaction
      4. Political geography
    5. Location Geography
      1. Economic geography
      2. Urban studies
      3. Environmental impact
    6. Area Analysis
      1. Regional structure
      2. Cultural regions
      3. Natural resource regions

    Primary Faculty
    West, Rebecca
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEOG 1500 - Geography of Michigan & the Upper Great Lakes

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    A geographic study of the landforms, culture and economic activities of Michigan and the surrounding Great Lakes states and provinces.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify the location of Michigan and the Upper Great Lakes.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the peninsular shape.
    2. Describe the location.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify the processes that formed Michigan and the Upper Great Lakes.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the impact of the processes.
    2. Describe the resulting landscape.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to recognize migration and settlement patterns.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss initial and ensuing settlers of each peninsula.
    2. Identify influences of these settlers, including those that remain to this day.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to recognize transportation patterns.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the importance of water routes.
    2. Describe the evolution of land routes.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the cultural and economic patterns that have formed.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the role of natural resources.
    2. Describe the urban development.

    Outcome 6:
    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the concept of Sustainable Development.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify quality of life issues.
    2. Explain global warming’s effect on Michigan and the Great Lakes.
    3. Explain globalization’s effect on Michigan and the Great Lakes.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Location
      1. Michigan’s unique shape
      2. Relative location
      3. Absolute location
      4. Location and history
    2. Physical environment and natural resource base
      1. Glacial heritage
        1. Water
        2. Landforms
        3. Soils
      2. Great Lakes location
        1. Climate
        2. Biogeography
      3. Mineral resources
        1. Metal minerals
        2. Fossil fuels
        3. Other minerals
    3. Patterns of Human Activity
      1. Economic development
        1. Agriculture
        2. Lumbering
        3. Mining
        4. Manufacturing
      2. Today’s economy
        1. Manufacturing
        2. Agriculture
        3. Tourism
        4. Transportation patterns
        5. Trade patterns
      3. Population
        1. Distribution
        2. Growth
        3. Immigration and change
        4. Demographics
    4. Regional Patterns
      1. Primate city development
      2. Ethnic patterns
      3. Urban change

    Primary Faculty
    West, Rebecca
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEOG 1800 - Physical Geography

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Physical geography introduces the four spatial dimensions of earth’s atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.  Students explore the fundamentals of physical geography through scientific lecture and laboratory work as they investigate the interrelationships of the physical and functional realms.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to diagram the earth’s dynamic systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the four physical spheres.
    2. Explain the scientific correlation and development of the spheres.
    3. Identify and illustrate the fundamentals of the earth’s grid coordinates and important lines of latitude. 

     

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to summarize Earth-Sun relationships.

    Objectives:

    1. Calculate and illustrate the earth’s global energy balance.
    2. Identify conditions during Equinox & Solstice periods (the seasons) of the year.

     

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to diagram the earth’s atmospheric and hydrospheric patterns.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify current conditions and forecast weather using maps and basic meteorological skills.
    2. Illustrate  global wind, ocean current, and air pressure systems.
    3. Understand and diagram the water cycle.

     

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret global climates and natural and anthropogenic causes of climate change.

    Objectives:

    1. Classify and identify the geographic distribution of climates using the Koppen system.
    2. Identify geographic controls of major climates.
    3. Identify and discuss the potential impacts on physical and human systems of projected increases in CO2 emissions and global average surface temperatures.

     

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to organize lithospheric activity.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify patterns and determine the main characteristics of soil taxonomy.
    2. Summarize continental drift,  tectonic plate boundaries, common tectonic features, and the effect they have on the global distribution of landforms.
    3. Identify the numerous features of a mass movement using morphological vocabulary.
    4. Discuss the natural and human contributing variables to mass-movement events, as well as the triggering mechanisms.

     

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to organize the ecosystems and biogeographical cycles into interrelated systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Classify characteristics and controls of plant species using precipitation, soil, and topographic data.
    2.  Summarize common vegetation and geography of specific biomes.

     

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate the use of geographic approaches as they apply to natural phenomena.

    Objectives:

    1. Use the basics of the scientific method through hands-on laboratory experiences.
    2. Interpret observations and analyze diverse data sets through scientific investigations.
    3. Demonstrate the utility of spatial and temporal scales of inquiry
    4. Apply techniques of imaging the earth through the use and application of self-made maps, topographic maps, satellite imagery, and geographic information systems (GIS).


    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    1. Earth Imagery and Mapping

         a. Conceptual geography and the scientific method

         b. Earth’s major systems

         c. Latitude & longitude

         d. Remote Sensing

         e. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

    2. Atmospheric systems

         a. Composition of the atmosphere

         b. Seasons and solar energy

         c. Hydrologic cycle

         d. Wind circulation systems

         e. Storms and major weather events

         f. Climate change

    3. Biogeography

         a. Patterns of biodiversity

         b. Biome classifications

         c. Soil and water resources

         d. Ocean ecosystems

    4. Tectonic system

         a. Geologic time

         b. Earth’s internal structure

         c. Plate tectonics

         d. Rocks and minerals

         e. Geohazards (volcanoes and earthquakes)

    5. Erosion and deposition

         a. Weathering and mass movement

         b. Fluvial systems

         c. Glacial landforms

         d. Desert landforms

         e. Coastal landforms

     


    Primary Faculty
    West, Rebecca
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEOG 2000 - World Regional Geography

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    An introductory study of geography from a world regional perspective focusing upon the distribution and interconnections of the world’s physical, economic, cultural, and political systems.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize world regions.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the concept of regions.
    2. Describe how the regions are defined.
    3. Identify major regions.

    Outcome 2:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use the regional concept.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify regions based on the physical setting, economic systems and culture.
    2. Compare less developed, more developed, and miss-developed regions.

    Outcome 3:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the role and consequences of European colonialism.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe how colonialism created the present world political and economic patterns.
    2. Describe how colonialism affected the cultures and languages of the world.

    Outcome 4:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the patterns of economic interdependence among the regions.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe how the patterns evolved.
    2. Identify emerging patterns.

    Outcome 5:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize migration patterns.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain human migration patterns.
    2. Identify and analyze problems caused by migration.
    3. Describe the benefits of migration.

    Outcome 6:
    Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize current cultural and geopolitical conflicts.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the process of Nationalism.
    2. Explain the process of devolution. (Based on the National Geography Standards, 1994)

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. More Developed Regions
      1. Physical environment
        1. Location: absolute and relative
        2. Physical landforms
        3. Climate
        4. Resource base
      2. Human environment
        1. Economic activities
        2. Cultural traits
        3. Political geography
        4. Urban development
      3. Sub-regional profiles
        1. Core development
        2. Agricultural heartland
        3. Outliers
    2. Miss-developed Regions
      1. Physical environment
        1. Location: absolute and relative
        2. Physical landforms
        3. Climate
        4. Resource base
      2. Human environment
        1. Economic activities
        2. Cultural traits
        3. Political geography
        4. Urban development
      3. Sub-regional profiles
        1. Core development
        2. Agricultural heartland
        3. Outliers
    3. Less Developed Regions
      1. Physical environment
        1. Location: absolute and relative
        2. Physical landforms
        3. Climate
        4. Resource base
      2. Human environment
        1. Economic activities
        2. Cultural traits
        3. Political geography
        4. Urban development
      3. Sub-regional profiles
        1. Core development
        2. Agricultural heartland
        3. Outliers

    Primary Faculty
    West, Rebecca
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Geology

  
  •  

    GEOL 1080 - Geology of Michigan

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    A basic introduction to Michigan geology, including its minerals and rocks, fossils, scenic features and the processes that formed them, geologic history, and economic geology.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe how the Scientific Method relates to Geologic Features in Michigan.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the Bohr model of the Atom and know the common elements of the Earth’s Crust.
    2. Describe the Energy Cycles of the External and Internal forces that change the Earth’s Crust.
    3. Describe some of the basic Biological processes that affect the Sedimentary Rock Record.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify how the fundamental Principles of Geology relate to Geologic examples in Michigan.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the common rock-forming minerals found in Michigan.
    2. Identify the common rocks found in Michigan.
    3. Describe the Principles of Uniformitarianism, Original Horizontality, Superposition, and Cross-cutting Relationship.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify Michigan Sedimentological Processes.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the basic Sedimentary Processes that contribute commonly in Michigan to Erosion, Transportation, and Deposition of sediment.
    2. Identify some of the more common landforms in Michigan created by Sedimentary Processes.
    3. Identify the common Economic Resources related to Sedimentary Rocks.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe how the sequence of Geologic Events that have occurred in Michigan represent elements of Historical Geology.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the common sequence of Geologic Time (name of Eons, Eras, and Periods) and their relative time before present.
    2. Identify the common Geologic Events that occurred during common time periods and how those events effected the Geologic formation of parts of Michigan.
    3. Describe the common Geologic Resources found in different Geologic time periods.
    4. Describe the basic change in the Fossil Record as found in Michigan.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe how the basic elements of Structural Geology are present in Michigan surface and subsurface geologic features.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the difference between anticline and syncline folds and how those folds relate to structural domes and basins, particularly the Michigan Basin.
    2. Describe how folds can appear as common landforms when influenced by erosion.
    3. Describe Tectonic forces like mountain building that can change originally horizontal sedimentary beds to create folds and faults.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to provide a basic description of how Geologic studies in Michigan relate to concepts of Environmental Geology.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the Economic Geologic Resources that have been developed in Michigan.
    2. Describe briefly how some of the common Geologic Resources are developed and what environmental concerns this development creates.
    3. Describe the value of understanding Environmental Science values by studying Geology in Michigan.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Introduction to Geology
      1. Minerals
        1. Identification
        2. Michigan Minerals
      2. Igneous Rocks and Processes
      3. Sedimentary Rock and Processes
        1. Geologic Principles
      4. Metamorphic Rocks and Processes
    2. Geologic Time
      1. Relative Age Dating Techniques
      2. Absolute Age Dating Techniques
      3. Geologic Time Scale
    3. Introduction to Michigan Geology
      1. The Precambrian Record in Michigan
      2. The Paleozoic Era Record in Michigan
      3. The Mesozoic Era Record in Michigan
      4. Glaciation and its Processes
      5. The Pleistocene Epoch Record in Michigan
        1. Glacial Landforms & Events
        2. The Glacial Great Lakes
      6. The Holocene Epoch Record in Michigan
        1. Shorelines
        2. Wind Deposition
        3. Streams
        4. Ground Water

    Primary Faculty
    Sadorski, Joseph
    Secondary Faculty
    Schafer, Carl
    Associate Dean
    Young, Randall
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEOL 1105 - Environmental Geology: Natural Disasters and Earth Resources

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    An integrated lecture-laboratory course that introduces students to the environmental analysis of hydrogeology, mining and mineral resources, soils, and air pollution. These topics will be related to impacts resulting from natural disasters and how they affect all life on planet Earth. Coverage includes the cause and aftermath of earthquakes, volcanology, flooding, mass wasting, subsidence, climate destabilization and climate change, tsunamis, and wildfires.

    Billable Contact Hours: 6

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the relationship between planet Earth’s general internal structure and the theory of plate tectonics.

    Objectives:

    1. Relate theories of Earth’s structure to energy and motion of the lithospheric plates.
    2. Relate plate boundaries to the structure of continental and oceanic crust.
    3. Relate rock cycle materials to plate tectonics.
    4. Relate tectonic activities to results such as volcanism, mountain building, and earthquakes.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the fundamental concepts and origins of terrestrial-borne geologic disasters.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe Earthquake concepts and origins.
    2. Describe tsunami concepts and origins.
    3. Describe volcano concepts and origins.
    4. Describe flooding concepts and origins.
    5. Describe mass wasting concepts and origins.
    6. Describe wild fire concepts and origins.
    7. Describe coastal hazard concepts.
    8. Describe previous and/or eventual occurrences of each natural disaster.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the fundamental concepts and origins meteorological disasters.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe severe weather concepts and origins.
    2. Describe hurricane concepts and origins.
    3. Describe climate disruption relative to climate change.
    4. Describe previous and/or eventual occurrences of each natural disaster.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to relate Earth disasters to their effects on all organic life relative to regional and global economics.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe how these events play a role in resource creation or degradation.
    2. Compare the likelihood of each natural disaster.
    3. Compare the ecologic and environmental effects of each natural disaster.
    4. Compare the financial cost of each natural disaster.
    5. Describe the impacts on human life.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    1. Intro to Environmental Geology
      1. Earth water as a resource
        1. Hydrologic cycle
        2. Fresh vs saline water systems
        3. Groundwater and freshwater management
      2. Mining resources
        1. Types of mineral resources
        2. Types of mining techniques
        3. Uses of mined mineral resources and source locations relative to economics
      3. Soils as a resource
        1. Soil profiles and types of soil
        2. Importance of soil
        3. Soil degradation
      4. Air pollution
        1. Structure of the Atmosphere (i.e., the four layers)
        2. Natural vs anthropogenic contributors to air pollution
        3. Clean fuel alternatives
    2. Natural Disasters
      1. Why it is important to study natural disasters relative to the environment and economics
      2. The geologic cycle
      3. Natural disasters serve as important natural service functions
    3. Internal Earth structure relative to the theory of Plate Tectonics
      1. Earth’s layers and their characteristics and functions
      2. Plate tectonics
        1. Plate boundaries
        2. Geologic features created
        3. The driving force of plate movement: mantle convection
      3. Plate tectonics relative to the rock cycle
        1. Three rock types and their origins
    4. Earthquake disasters
      1. Earthquakes relative to plate boundaries and notable locations
        1. Faults
        2. Epicenters of deep to shallow focus Earthquakes relative to each boundary
        3. Earthquake disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of Earthquakes
      4. Links to other natural disasters
      5. Extraterrestrial quakes?
    5. Tsunami disasters
      1. Origin of tsunamis and notable locations
        1. Tsunami disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of tsunamis
      4. Links to other natural disasters
    6. Volcano disasters
      1. Origin of volcanoes and notable locations
        1. Plate boundary vs hot spots
        2. Compositions and eruption styles
        3. Rock types produced
        4. Volcanic disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of volcanoes
      4. Links to other natural disasters
      5. Volcanoes in space!
    7. Flooding disasters
      1. Earth’s hydrosphere and notable locations
        1. Oceans, seas, rivers, and ground water
        2. Flood disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of Earth’s hydrosphere
      4. Links to other natural disasters
    8. Mass wasting disasters
      1. Intro to landslides and notable locations
        1. Created through tectonic movement
        2. Oversaturation of soil at steep topography
        3. Lahars
        4. Landslide disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of landslides
      4. Links to other natural disasters
    9. Wild fire disasters
      1. Intro to wild fires
        1. Locations prone to wild fires
        2. Proper land management (e.g., USFS, NPS, BLM)
        3. Wild fire disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of wild fires
      4. Links to other natural disasters
    10. Coastal disasters
      1. Intro to coastal hazards and notable locations
        1. Coastal hazard history and occurrence intervals
      2. Coastal processes
      3. Sea-level change
      4. Environmental risk relative to region
      5. Natural service of coastal disasters
      6. Links to other natural disasters
      7. Hurricane/Typhoons
        1. How heat plays a role
        2. Intensification due to climate change
        3. Hurricane disaster history and occurrence intervals
        4. Environmental risk relative to region
        5. Natural service of hurricanes
        6. Links to other natural disasters
    1. Sever weather disasters
      1. Intro to meteorology concepts
        1. Earth energy transfer and balance
        2. Atmosphere components
        3. Tornado Ally in the U.S.A.
        4. Severe weather disaster history and occurrence intervals
      2. Environmental risk relative to region
      3. Natural service of severe weather
      4. Links to other natural disasters
    2. Climate disruption disasters
      1. Climate vs weather
      2. Concentrations of greenhouse gasses relative to the industrial age
        1. How CO2, SO2, and water vapor play a role
        2. Origins of these gasses both naturally and unnaturally
        3. Climate change history
      3. Environmental risk relative to region
      4. Natural service of climate disruption
      5. Links to other natural disasters

    Laboratory Core:

    Section 1: terrestrial disaster labs working with actual data to construct extent of Earthquake, volcano, and tsunami disasters using geologic maps, both digital and hard copy. Google Earth Pro will be used as a tool for investigation. Geologic maps will be produced within regions affected by mass wasting to calculate approximate amount of material that was moved. GIS program ArcMap will be used to approximate the amount of human population that will be displaced if global sea level rises over 100 ft relative to coastal hazards.

    Section 2: Meteorological disaster labs relating to hurricane power, intensity, duration, and direction with actual data. Measurements of CO2 gasses in a particular volume of space and their heating potential within a makeshift greenhouse.


    Primary Faculty
    Sadorski, Joseph
    Secondary Faculty
    Schafer, Carl
    Associate Dean
    Young, Randall
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEOL 1140 - Introduction to Physical Geology

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    An integrated lecture‑laboratory course that introduces students to the study of Geology. Coverage includes formation and identification of common minerals and rocks, development of Earth’s landscape through the study of surface processes, origin of volcanoes, earthquakes, and mountain ranges, and their relationship to the Theory of Plate Tectonics. One optional field trip.

    Billable Contact Hours: 6

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of common minerals and their properties.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the chemical structure and physical properties of the common rock-forming minerals.
    2. Identify common rock-forming minerals in the Earth’s crust.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of common rocks and their properties.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the chemical and physical components of Igneous Rocks.
    2. Identify the chemical and physical components of Sedimentary Rocks.
    3. Identify the chemical and physical components of Metamorphic Rocks.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of Surficial Processes.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the Weathering process to the Chemical and Physical resulting materials that make up the Earth’s surface formation.
    2. Describe modes of erosion, transportation and deposition of sediments.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of internal processes of the Earth.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe origins of Intrusive and Extrusive Igneous Rocks.
    2. Recognize the basic Geologic structures in the Earth’s crust related to tectonic stresses.
    3. Recognize elements of Seismicity that characterize earthquake activities.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the relationship between basic geological principles and the theory of plate tectonics

    Objectives:

    1. Relate theories of Earth’s structure to energy and motion of the lithospheric plates.
    2. Relate plate boundaries to the structure of continental and oceanic crust.
    3. Relate rock cycle materials to plate tectonics.
    4. Relate tectonic activities to results such as volcanism, mountain building, and earthquakes.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Planet Earth
    2. Atoms, Elements, & Minerals
    3. Igneous Processes & Rocks
      1. Intrusive Igneous Rocks
      2. Volcanism & Extrusive Igneous Rocks
    4. Weathering and Soil Formation
    5. Mass Wasting
    6. Stream Action and Landscape
    7. Ground Water
    8. Glaciers and Ice Ages
    9. Wind & Wave Action Landforms
    10. Sedimentary Rocks and Geologic Principles
      1. Clastic Sedimentary Rocks
      2. Chemical Sedimentary Rocks
      3. Organic Sedimentary Rocks
    11. Metamorphic Processes & Rocks
      1. Regional Metamorphic Rocks
      2. Contact Metamorphic Rocks
      3. Hydrothermal Metamorphic Rocks
    12. Structural Geology
      1. Folding
      2. Faulting
    13. Earthquakes & Earth’s Interior
    14. Plate Tectonics

    Laboratory Core:

    1. Mineral Identification
    2. Igneous Rock Identification
    3. Sedimentary Rock Identification
    4. Metamorphic Rock Identification
    5. Topographic Map Use
    6. Stream Landforms
    7. Ground Water
    8. Glacial Landforms
    9. Landforms related to Wind Action
    10. Geologic Maps

    Primary Faculty
    Schafer, Carl
    Secondary Faculty
    Sadorski, Joseph
    Associate Dean
    Young, Randall
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GEOL 1150 - Historical Geology: The Study of the Geologic History of Planet Earth

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    An integrated lecture‑laboratory‑field course that studies the geologic history of Planet Earth from its creation to the present time. The first part of the course focuses on the methods geologists use to investigate and unravel Earth’s history; the second part of the course applies these methods to present the geologic history of the North American continent. One required field trip.

    Billable Contact Hours: 6

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of relative dating techniques.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize Geologic principles important to interpreting stratigraphic systems.
    2. Recognize elements of the Geologic Time Scale and its historic development.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of radiometric dating techniques.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe different forms of radioactive decay of elements.
    2. Describe radiometric dating of rocks and illustrate the limitations of this technique.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to decipher the depositional and tectonic history of a geographic area.

    Objectives:

    1. Classify common sedimentary structures and describe their formations.
    2. Correlate rock units related to tectonic settings, depositional history, and paleogeography.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify global geologic processes and their impact on shaping the Earth.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the theory and development of Plate Tectonics.
    2. Illustrate Crustal development by Continental Accretion and Sea-floor Spreading.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to determine the sedimentary environment in which a rock is formed based on its composition, texture, presence of sedimentary structures, and fossil content.

    Objectives:

    1. Interpret Depositional Environments based on characteristics of Sedimentary Rocks.
    2. Demonstrate an understanding of the Fossil Record by preservation type and biologic relationship to age and depositional environments.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the basic geological history of Earth with an emphasis on North America.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain global Geologic events by time periods.
    2. Explain the Geologic development of North America.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Lecture Core:
      1. Minerals & Rocks
        1. Sedimentary Processes - Geologic Principles
          1. Environments of Deposition
          2. Primary Sedimentary Structures
      2. Geologic Time - Development of the Time Scale
        1. Correlation & Relative Time
        2. Absolute Age Dating Techniques
      3. The Fossil Record: Organic Evolution in the Geologic Record
        1. Uniformitarianism: in reality
        2. Elements of Evolution
        3. Fossilization: what is preserved & how
      4. Earth’s Physical Processes
        1. Planetary development to the development of Atmosphere
        2. Plate Tectonics
        3. Geologic Structures
        4. Mountain Building & Continental Accretion
    2. The Story in Time
      1. Precambrian
        1. To the Archeozoic Eon
        2. Proterozoic Eon
      2. Paleozoic Eon - the age of Seas / Life explodes
        1. By Period
      3. Middle Life - the Mesozoic - the transition of life forms
        1. By Period
      4. Recent Life - the Cenozoic - mammals & flowers
        1. The Paleogene
        2. The Neogene & Glaciers to the Holocene

    Primary Faculty
    Schafer, Carl
    Secondary Faculty
    Sadorski, Joseph
    Associate Dean
    Young, Randall
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


German Language

  
  •  

    GRMN 1460 - Elementary German 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly GRMN 1260)

    This course is designed to introduce students to the German speaking world and German vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to express personal meaning on basic topics. Students will engage in these activities within contextualized cultural settings. The vocabulary and grammatical structures are integrated into interactive and communicative activities that emphasize all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in basic oral language skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in small conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker):
      1. Small talk (greetings and farewells, getting acquainted).
      2. Numbers and classroom expressions.
      3. Personal characteristics, hobbies, interests, and daily activities.
      4. Types of housing, furnishings.
      5. Family members.
      6. Days of the week, months, holidays.
      7. Times of the day, telling time.
      8. Entertainment.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use basic German vocabulary.

    Objectives: Regarding such topics as small talk, numbers and classroom expressions, personal characteristics, hobbies, housing & furnishings, family members, calendar, time, and entertainment:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use basic grammar structures in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    1. Use articles, nouns, and pronouns.
    2. Conjugate and use verbs in the present tense (stem-vowel changes, separable prefix, modal auxiliary).
    3. Formulate affirmative, negative, and questioning remarks.
    4. State nominative and accusative cases.
    5. Use adjectives (attiributive and predicate, possessive).
    6. Use the imperative.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of German culture.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some basic geographical, economical and cultural aspects of some German speaking countries and/or communities such as:
      1. Postal codes and country abbreviations.
      2. Foreigners in Germany.
      3. The 24 hour clock and its usage.
      4. German apartments.
      5. The Euro.
      6. German holidays and celebrations.
      7. Government-subsidized theaters.
      8. Some famous personalities from the German-speaking world.
    2. Compare cultural differences.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Greetings
    2. Numbers
    3. Useful Expressions
    4. Nouns, Gender, and Definite Articles
    5. Personal Pronouns
    6. The Verb: Infinitive and Present Tense
    7. Word Order in Sentences
    8. Asking Questions
    9. The Plural of Nouns
    10. The Nominative and Accusative Cases
    11. The Definite and Indefinite Article
    12. Weak Masculine Nouns
    13. Interrogative Pronouns
    14. The Verb haben
    15. Negation
    16. Verbs with Stem-Vowel Changes
    17. Demonstrative Pronouns
    18. Possessive Adjectives
    19. Personal Pronouns in the Accusative Case
    20. Prepositions with the Accusative Case
    21. The Irregular Verbs werden and wissen
    22. Using the Verbs wissen and kennen
    23. Separable-Prefix Verbs
    24. Modal Auxiliary Verbs in the Present Tense
    25. The Imperative - formal and informal
    26. Particles and bitte with the Imperative

    Primary Faculty
    Ramos, Maria
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GRMN 1470 - Elementary German 2

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: GRMN 1460  or two or more years of high school German

    (formerly GRMN 1270)

    This course continues students’ development of German language and culture by building and expanding on the culture, vocabulary and language structures learned in GRMN 1460. New language functions will be presented in meaningful activities that emphasize all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing and allow for further cultural exposure. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in oral language skills beyond Elementary German 1.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker).
      1. Types of food, names of stores and shops.
      2. Clothes and colors.
      3. Places to eat and drink, ordering in a restaurant.
      4. Sports and leisure pastimes and locations.
      5. Seasons and weather expressions.
      6. Health and fitness, the human body, common illnesses and complaints.
      7. Morning activities.
      8. Places in the city, hotel, and lodging expressions.
      9. Ask for and give directions.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use German vocabulary related to

    Objectives: Regarding topics such as clothing and grocery shopping, restaurants and food, weather, daily routine, celebrations, health, medical conditions, and hospitals:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use grammar structures beyond Elementary German 1 in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    1. Use Dative case.
    2. Use two-way prepositions.
    3. Conjugate the simple past tense of modal verbs and the present perfect tense.
    4. Use coordinating and subordinating conjunctions.
    5. Use reflexive pronouns and verbs.
    6. Use Genitive case.
    7. Use attributive adjectives.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of German culture beyond Elementary German 1.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some geographical, economical and cultural aspects of some German speaking countries and/or communities such as:
      1. European clothing sizes, shopping, prices, weights and measures.
      2. Regional food specialties, menus, sharing tables in restaurant, paying the bill, the importance of coffeehouses.
      3. Sports, hobbies, and clubs in German-speaking countries.
      4. Health spas in Germany, differences between drug stores.
      5. Services of tourist information offices.
    2. Compare cultural differences.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. The Dative Case and Personal Pronouns in the Dative
    2. Articles and Possessive Adjectives in the Dative
    3. The Dative Case for Indirect Objects
    4. Position of Dative and Accusative Objects
    5. Wer, Wen, or Wem?
    6. Verbs with a Dative Object Only
    7. Prepositions with the Dative Case
    8. Interrogative Pronouns wo, wohin, and woher
    9. The der-Words dieser, jeder, and welcher
    10. Two-Way Prepositions
    11. Describing Location
    12. Describing Placement
    13. Expressing Time with Prepositions
    14. Expressing Events in the Past
    15. The Simple Past Tense of sein and haben
    16. The Simple Past Tense of Modals
    17. Coordinating Conjunctions
    18. Expressing a Contrast: aber vs. sondern
    19. The Present Perfect Tense
    20. Formation of the Past Participle
    21. Weak Verbs
    22. Strong Verbs
    23. Mixed Verbs
    24. Verbs with Inseparable Prefixes
    25. Verbs Ending in -ieren
    26. Verbs With Separable Prefixes
    27. The Use of haben or sein in the Present Perfect Tense
    28. Connecting Sentences: Subordinating Conjunctions
    29. Indirect Questions
    30. Reflexive Pronouns and Verbs
    31. Reflexive Pronouns
    32. Verbs with Accusative Reflexive Pronouns
    33. Verbs with Reflexive Pronouns in the Accusative or Dative
    34. Expressing Reciprocity
    35. The Genitive Case
    36. Proper Names in the Genitive
    37. Prepositions with the Genitive
    38. Attributive Adjectives
    39. Adjectives after a Definite Article or Other der-Word
    40. Adjectives after an Indefinite Article or Other ein-Word
    41. Adjectives without a Preceding Article
    42. Adjectives Referring to Cities and Regions

    Primary Faculty
    Ramos, Maria
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    GRMN 2460 - Intermediate German 1

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: GRMN 1470 

    (formerly GRMN 2360)

    Third-semester German picks up where GRMN 1470 has ended. The central goal is to advance the student’s communicative ability and cultural competency with an emphasis on assimilating the language for complex communicative purposes. New language functions will be presented in meaningful activities that emphasize all four language skills: speaking, listening, reading and writing, and empower further cultural exploration. Students are required to use computer based technology to practice these skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate competency in oral language skills beyond Elementary German 2.

    Objectives:

    1. Pronounce individual sounds, including appropriate intonation and stress, with little or no interference in order to be understood by a Native Speaker.
    2. Form and produce entire sentences with no hesitation and natural pauses.
    3. Engage in small conversations with a Native Speaker in the present or near future tense about the following topics (includes both initiating conversations as well as responding appropriately to speech of a Native Speaker)
      1. Travel, vacations, means of transportation, items to take on vacation.
      2. World of work, professions.
      3. Money matters.
      4. The house, household appliances.
      5. Television, newspaper, and other media; technology.
      6. Global problems, environment, discussion strategies.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use German vocabulary related to travel, vacations, transportation, world of work, money, house, appliances, communication media, technology, global problems, and the environment.

    Objectives:

    1. Use vocabulary when speaking.
    2. Respond to a Native Speaker who has used the vocabulary.
    3. Use vocabulary in writing.
    4. Demonstrate reading comprehension skills by discussing subject matter and/or answering questions based on the passage read.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate the ability to use grammar structures beyond Elementary German 2 in speaking and writing.

    Objectives:

    1. Use comparative and superlative adjectives and adverbs.
    2. Conjugate and use simple past tense and the past perfect tense.
    3. Conjugate and use the future tense.
    4. Use relative clauses.
    5. Use verbs with fixed prepositions.
    6. Conjugate and use the future tense and the conditional.
    7. Use adjectives, nouns, adverbs: make comparisons.
    8. Use the subjunctive.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize and discuss aspects of German culture beyond Elementary German 2.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and discuss some geographical, economical and cultural aspects of some German speaking countries and/or communities such as:
      1. German vacations, dealing with a travel agency, buying a train ticket.
      2. Help-wanted ads and applying for a job.
      3. The German school system.
      4. The Euro, BaföG.
      5. Contemporary art in Germany.
      6. Media, radio and. television in Germany.
      7. The environment, global problems and issues, speed limits in Europe, recycling.
      8. German history from 1939 until today.
    2. Compare cultural differences.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Comparing Things and People
    2. Comparing Two Items
    3. The Comparative of Adjectives and Adverbs
    4. The Superlative of Adjectives and Adverbs
    5. Adverbs and Predicate Adjectives in the Superlative
    6. Attributive Adjectives in the Superlative
    7. Adjectival Nouns
    8. Narrating Events in the Past: The Simple Past Tense
    9. Weak Verbs
    10. Strong Verbs
    11. Irregular Verbs
    12. The Conjunction als
    13. The Past Perfect Tense
    14. Future Tense
    15. Describing People or Things: Relative Clauses
    16. The Relative Pronouns
    17. The Interrogative Pronoun was für (ein)
    18. Negating Sentences and the Position of nicht
    19. Negation: noch nicht / noch kein(e); nicht mehr / kein(e) … mehr
    20. Verbs with Fixes Prepositions
    21. Da- and wo-Compounds
    22. Prepositional Objects: da-Compounds
    23. The Adverbs dahin and daher
    24. Asking Questions: wo-Compounds
    25. The Subjunctive - Present Forms
    26. The use of würde with an Infinitive
    27. Expressing Wishes and Hypothetical Situations
    28. Talking About Contrary-to-Fact Conditions
    29. The Past Subjunctive
    30. The Verbs brauchen and scheinen
    31. Infinitive Clauses with zu
    32. Indirect Discourse with the Subj.: Present Tense
    33. Indirect Discourse with the Subj.: Past Tense
    34. Infinitive Clauses with um…zu and ohne…zu
    35. The Passive Voice - Formation
    36. Expressing the Agent
    37. Expressing a General Activity
    38. The Passive with Modal Verbs
    39. Use of man as an Alternative to the Passive
    40. The Present Participle

    Primary Faculty
    Ramos, Maria
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Ternullo, Annette
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Health & Human Service‑General

  
  •  

    HHSC 1010 - Animal Health Careers

    Credit Hours: 1.00


    Prerequisites: None

    HHSC‑1010 gives students information on the various career opportunities available in the animal health field. Topics include: Veterinarian, Veterinary Technician, Veterinary Assistant, zoo work, kennel management, various species‑specific careers, governmental and research careers, and business opportunities. Additional topics include: education requirements, licensing and registration, ethics, and jurisprudence. This course includes a 3 hour job shadow experience at a veterinary hospital.

    Billable Contact Hours: 1

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the career development of the veterinarian, including educational requirements, and career pathways after graduation and licensing.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the duties of the veterinarian.
    2. Describe the development of the veterinary profession over the years.
    3. Discuss the educational requirements for the veterinarian; including pre-vet studies.
    4. Identify continuing education requirements and opportunities for veterinarians.
    5. Identify and discuss various career pathways for licensed veterinarians.
    6. Discuss varying salary levels based on career paths.
    7. Research annual salary ranges for various career paths of the veterinarian.
    8. Recognize licensing requirements to practice veterinary medicine.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the career development of the veterinary technician, including educational requirements, licensing requirements, and career pathways after graduation and licensing.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the duties of the veterinary technician.
    2. Describe the development of the veterinary technician profession over the years.
    3. Recognize licensing requirements for Michigan and various states.
    4. Recognize the minimum educational requirements for the veterinary technician.
    5. Identify and discuss career pathways for the licensed veterinary technician.
    6. Discuss extended education opportunities for the veterinary technician.
    7. Discuss continuing education requirements and opportunities for the veterinary technician.
    8. Describe licensing requirements for graduating technician students.
    9. Discuss the average salary of the licensed veterinary technician in various career pathways.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the career development of guest speakers of various animal-related careers.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the duties of the veterinary assistant.
    2. Discuss the education required for veterinary assistants.
    3. Discuss employment opportunities for the veterinary assistant.
    4. Discuss various careers in animal health and welfare.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Veterinarian
    2. Veterinary Technician
    3. Veterinary Assistant
    4. Additional animal-related careers
    5. Job Shadow (mandatory requirement to pass course)

    Primary Faculty
    Delauter, Julie
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Shaw, Andrea
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HHSC 1020 - Physical Therapy Careers

    Credit Hours: 1.00


    Prerequisites: None

    HHSC 1040 provides introductory information related to the practice of nursing. It explores key concepts instrumental to nursing in relationship to nurses’ scope of practice and the use of technology in an ever-changing, multicultural healthcare environment.

    Billable Contact Hours: 1

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify and describe various components of the health care system in the United States.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe various types of health care settings.
    2. Describe the provision of physical therapy in various settings.
    3. Describe common types of health care reimbursement sources including Medicare, Medicaid, PPO, HMO.
    4. List and describe members of the healthcare team.
    5. Describe the manner in which members of the health care team interact to support patient management.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to discuss the history and function of the PT profession.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Define physical therapy.
    2. Relate the definition of physical therapy to provision of service in various settings.
    3. List historical facts that have supported the development of the physical therapy profession.
    4. Describe the roles and functions of Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Physical Therapy Aides in various settings.
    5. Discuss how the role of PT has evolved and changed.
    6. Discuss the evolution of the Physical Therapist Assistant.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the structure and function of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Discuss the value of a professional organization to its members and to the public.
    2. Identify the mission and goals of the American Physical Therapy Association.
    3. Describe the structure of the American Physical Therapy Association.
    4. Describe the core documents of the APTA that relate to standards, values, and behaviors in the provision of physical therapy.
    5. Describe the mission of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) in supporting the Physical Therapy Profession.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the provision of physical therapy for various patient populations.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe the musculoskeletal physical therapy.
    2. Describe neuromuscular physical therapy.
    3. Describe cardiopulmonary physical therapy.
    4. Describe physical therapy for children and in school settings.
    5. Describe geriatric physical therapy.
    6. Describe physical therapy in adult rehabilitation.
    7. Discuss licensure and regulation in the provision of physical therapy.
    8. Describe methods used to assure quality in the provision of physical therapy

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the education, roles, functions and relationships specific to Physical Therapist, Physical Therapist Assistant and Physical Therapy Aide.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Describe the education of the physical therapist and the physical therapist assistant.
    2. Compare and contrast the roles of the PT and the PTA.
    3. Describe preferred relationship between the physical therapist and the physical therapist assistant.
    4. Describe the function of the physical therapy aide.
    5. Describe the appropriate delegation and supervision of responsibilities for the PT, the PTA and the PT Aide.
    6. Describe attributes and role of effective supervision in physical therapy.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate orally and in writing appropriate medical terminology.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Identify the elements of medical terms including word root, combining form, prefix and suffix.
    2. Use word building to describe or define a medical term.
    3. Define selected medical terms.
    4. Define selected medial abbreviations.
    5. Use medical terminology appropriately in written and oral communication.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Health Care Systems
      1. Preventative
      2. Primary Health Care System
      3. Secondary Health Care System
      4. Tertiary Health Care System
      5. Rehabilitative Health Care System
      6. Extended Care
      7. Home Care
      8. Reimbursement in Healthcare/Third Party payers
      9. Health Care Team
    2. The Definition of Physical Therapy
      1. Definition of physical therapy
      2. Where PTs and PTAs practice
      3. Role of physical therapy in the overall provision of health care.
      4. Licensure and Regulation
      5. Physical Therapy as a profession
      6. PT/PTA demographics
      7. Role delineation of the physical therapist and the physical therapist assistant
      8. Scope of practice for the PTA
      9. Role of the PT aide/tech
      10. Education of the PT and PTA and the role of CAPTE
    3. History of Physical Therapy
      1. Why learn history
      2. Pre-PT history
      3. European influence
      4. PT in the United States
      5. Evolution of PT in the 1900’s and 2000’s
      6. The emergence of the PTA
    4. PT Practice Areas
      1. Musculoskeletal
      2. Neuromuscular
      3. Cardiopulmonary
      4. Adult Rehab
      5. School systems and children
      6. Geriatrics
      7. Home care
    5. Roles of Physical Therapy Personnel
      1. Preferred relationship PT/PTA
      2. Delegation and supervision
      3. Responsibilities
    6. APTA
      1. Overview of the APTA
      2. Mission and vision of the APTA
      3. Core documents of the APTA
      4. Career development, specialties, and advanced proficiency
      5. Membership eligibility and benefits
      6. MPTA and the Eastern District
      7. Information access via apta.org
    7. Medical and Physical Therapy Terminology
      1. Definitions of commonly used words
      2. Abbreviations common in Physical Therapy

    Primary Faculty
    Plisner, Carol
    Secondary Faculty
    Mele, Robert
    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HHSC 1030 - Orientation to Occupational Therapy

    Credit Hours: 1.00


    Prerequisites: None

    This course is designed to orient the student to the practice of occupational therapy in various health care settings. Review of foundations, history, professional organizations, legal and ethical aspects of practice and philosophical base of the profession and its personnel. Includes observational experience.

    Billable Contact Hours: 1

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate understanding birth, growth, and role of occupational Therapy Personnel in the profession, in health care and wellness promotion.

    Objectives:

    1. Define occupational therapy.
    2. Identify the main works in the development of OT.
    3. Identify the seven founders of the OT profession.
    4. Identify settings when occupational therapy personnel are employed.
    5. Identify the functions of occupational therapy.
    6. Identify characteristic traits of occupational therapy personnel.
    7. Identify the main events in the development of the COTA.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate understanding of the occupational therapy professional structures and role of occupational therapy personnel.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the OT professional organizations from national to local level and explain purpose.
    2. Identify the functions of AOTA.
    3. Identify the role of NBCOT and the certification process.
    4. Identify state regulations for license or registration of the OTR and COTA.
    5. Identify types of clients that commonly receive OT interventions.
    6. Identify the duties of the OTR/COTA.
    7. Identify the role of OT in team approaches.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the use of occupation, purposeful activity, and the OT practice framework.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the basic theories upon which OT practice is based.
    2. Identify the concept of occupation, purposeful activity and the relationship to ADL, IADL, work, education, play, leisure and social participation.
    3. Explain the concept of intervention and wellness promotion.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the variety of occupational therapy interventions.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the overall service functions of the OTR/COTA.
    2. Identify the functions of OT; physical dysfunction populations, mental health dysfunctions population, health and wellness populations.
    3. Identify the relationships between mental health and physical dysfunctions.
    4. Identify the application of activities to the practice of occupational therapy.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of professional and ethics, the relationship to the client and professional obligations.

    Objectives:

    1. Define professionalism.
    2. Define ethics.
    3. Identify professionalism and ethics as related to OT.
    4. Identify the role of OT; patient rights, confidentiality and documentation.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Birth and Growth of the Occupational Therapy Profession
      1. Definition of occupational therapy
      2. The main events in the development of OT from World War I to the present
      3. The founders of the OT profession
      4. Places where occupational therapists and COTAs are employed
      5. The functions of occupational therapy
      6. Characteristic traits of occupational therapy personnel
    2. Birth, Growth and Role of the COTA in the Profession
      1. The main events in the development of the COTA
      2. The duties of the COTA
      3. The certification process
    3. Occupational Therapy Professional Structure and the Role of OT Personnel
      1. The OT professional organizations from the international to the local level and explain their purpose
      2. Observation of an OT department and/or an occupational therapist working with a patient
      3. Types of patients commonly treated by occupational therapy
      4. The duties of the OTR/COTA
      5. The duties of the OT Aide
      6. The duties and explain the role of OT volunteers
      7. The functions of the AOTA
    4. Theoretical Basis for the Practice of Occupational Therapy, Including Work, Play and Leisure
      1. Theories upon which the practice of OT is based
      2. The concept of rehabilitation
      3. OT practice framework
    5. The Team Approach in Rehabilitation
      1. Team approach, members and roles
      2. The role of OT on the team
      3. Advantages of the team approach
      4. Health care team coordination
    6. Professionalism and Ethics as Related to the Practice of Occupational Therapy
      1. Professionalism
      2. Ethics
      3. Professionalism and ethics as related to OT
      4. Legal precautions concerning clients
      5. List clients’ rights as given
      6. The usual contents of a medical record or client chart
      7. Privileged and non-privileged information in client records
      8. The use of medical records as legal documents
    7. Major Areas of Occupational Therapy Treatment
      1. The overall service functions of the OTR/COTA
      2. The functions of the OT in physical disabilities
      3. The functions of the OT in mental health
      4. The functions of the OT in school setting/pediatrics
      5. The relationship between psychiatric and physical disorders and health promotion
      6. The application of normal activities to the practice of occupational therapy

    Primary Faculty
    Seefried, Mariea
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HHSC 1040 - Introduction to the Profession of Nursing

    Credit Hours: 1.50


    Prerequisites: None

    HHSC‑1040 provides introductory information related to the practice of nursing. It explores key concepts instrumental to nursing in relationship to nurses’ scope of practice and the use of technology in an ever‑changing, multicultural health care environment.

    Billable Contact Hours: 1.5

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to define and describe the professional practice of nursing.

    Objectives:

    1. The student will define the nursing scope and practice historically and currently.
    2. The student will recognize legal and ethical issues in nursing practice.
    3. The student will list career opportunities in nursing.
    4. The student will recognize the importance of personal wellness in nursing.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the challenges faced by nurses in the current healthcare environment.

    Objectives:

    1. The student will explain how cultural diversity impacts nursing.
    2. The student will recognize issues of safety including disaster and bioterrorism.
    3. The student will discuss how stress impacts nursing.
    4. The student will recognize the importance of collaboration with many disciplines.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to can use simple technology common to the nursing profession.

    Objectives:

    1. The student will demonstrate basic math skills needed for nursing practice.
    2. The student will create a personal health care record.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Practice of Nursing
      1. Practice, roles, and responsibilities
      2. Definition of nursing
      3. History of nursing
      4. Standards and scope of practice
      5. Caring
      6. Legal/ethical issues
      7. Career opportunities/benefits
      8. Personal wellness
      9. Confidentiality
      10. Clinical calculations
      11. Teaching and learning principles
    2. Technology
      1. Electronic health records (EHR) / Personal health records (PHR)
      2. Electronic medical records (EMR)
    3. Healthcare Environment
      1. Cultural diversity
      2. Culture of safety
      3. Disaster and bioterrorism
      4. Collaboration
      5. Stress

    Primary Faculty
    Sawyer, Linda
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Shaw, Andrea
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HHSC 1700 - Medical Terminology

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly MAST 1700)

    This course is designed for those individuals who have a need for working knowledge of medical terminology in a variety of medical, paramedical, and medical office positions. Stress will be placed on medical terminology as it occurs in the body’s many anatomical systems encompassing the structure of each anatomical system, common disease, anomalies, and surgeries.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course students will be able define medical terms built from word parts. These word parts include prefixes, suffixes and word roots. Objectives:

    1. Identify and define four word parts.
    2. Identify and define combining form.
    3. Use word parts to build medical terms for a given definition.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course students will be able use medical terms. Objectives:

    1. Define the disease and disorders terms, surgical terms, diagnostic terms, complementary terms and abbreviations for the various anatomical body systems
    2. Spell the disease and disorders terms, surgical terms, diagnostic terms, complementary terms and abbreviations for the various anatomical body systems

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course students will be able locate anatomical position using medical terms. Objectives:

    1. Describe body planes
    2. Describe directional terms
    3. Describe quadrants
    4. Describe body cavities

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Introduction to Word Parts and Human Body Structure
      1. Introduction to Word Parts
      2. Body Structure, Color and Oncology
      3. Directional Terms, Anatomical Planes, Regions, and Quadrants
    2. Body Systems
      1. Integumentary System
      2. Respiratory System
      3. Urinary System
      4. Male Reproductive System
      5. Female Reproductive System
      6. Obstetrics and Neonatology
      7. Cardiovascular and Lymphatic Systems
      8. Digestive System
      9. Eye
      10. Ear
      11. Musculoskeletal System
      12. Nervous System and Common Psychiatric Terms
      13. Endocrine System

    Primary Faculty
    Domanke-Nuytten, Donna
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HHSC 1740 - Survey of Body Systems

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly MAST 1740 and HITT 1740)

    This course will introduce students to basic anatomy and physiology, common pathology, diagnostic measures, and treatment modalities applied to the healthcare field. Topics include cells, tissues, organs, and the various body systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, endocrine, nervous system, cardiology, circulatory, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. This course has been designed specifically for students in the Medical Assistant and Health Information Technology programs.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the structural organization of the human body.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify cells
    2. Identify tissues
    3. Identify organs
    4. Identify systems

     

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to label major organs in each body system:

    Objectives:

    1. Label diagrams of the:

    a. Integumentary System

    b. Skeletal System

    c. Muscular System

    d. Endocrine System

    e. Nervous System

    f. Cardiology System

    g. Circulatory System

    h. Lymphatic System

    i. Respiratory System

    j. Digestive System

    k. Urinary System

    l. Reproductive System

     

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the normal function of each body system.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the anatomical location of major organs in each body system:

    a. Integumentary

    b. Skeletal

    c. Muscular

    d. Endocrine

    e. Nervous

    f. Cardiology

    g. Circulatory

    h. Lymphatic

    i. Respiratory

    j. Digestive

    k. Urinary

    l. Reproductive

    1. Identify common pathology related to each body system: signs, symptoms, etiology
    2. Analyze pathology for each body system
    3. Identify diagnostic measures
    4. Identify treatment modalities

     

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to compare the structure and function of the human body across the life span.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe body changes relating to structure and function
    2. Identify differences in male and female body changes beginning with cell development and ending with death.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Structural organization of the human body
    1. Cells
    2. Tissues
    3. Organs
    4. Systems
    1. Major organs in each body system
    2. Body system
    1. Function of each
    2. Pathology of body systems
    3. Diagnostic measures
    4. Treatment modalities
    1. Structure and function of the human body across the life span

    Primary Faculty
    Cellitti, Janet
    Secondary Faculty
    Austin, Delena
    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


Health Information Technology

  
  •  

    HITT 1102 - Introduction to Health Information Management & the Health Care Environment

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HHSC 1700 , HHSC 1740 , and ITCS 1010  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1105  and HITT 1106  

    This course provides the student with an introduction to the organization of health care and to the health information management profession. Health record content, documentation requirements, and the accrediting and licensing agencies that govern health information will be reviewed.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret external standards, regulations and initiatives related to healthcare delivery systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards.
    2. Apply current laws, accreditation, licensure, and certification standards related to health information initiatives from the national, state, local, and facility levels.
    3. Skilled use of health record documentation requirements including accreditation, certification and licensing.
    4. Evaluate the type and content of health records.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe various healthcare providers and disciplines.

    Objectives:

    1. Differentiate the roles of various providers and disciplines throughout the continuum of healthcare and respond to their information needs.
    2. Identify and compare the various healthcare settings presented.
    3. Discuss and analyze health information management application in various healthcare settings.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to distinguish professional and practice-related privacy confidentiality and legal ethical issues.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply and promote ethical standards of practice.
    2. Compare current HIM practice with future trends.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply health care information requirements.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures to ensure the accuracy of health data.
    2. Monitor and apply organization-wide health record documentation guidelines.
    3. Apply policies and procedure to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards.
    4. Maintain the accuracy and completeness of the patient.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Introduction to the HIM Profession
    2. Purpose and Function of the Health Record
    3. Content and Structure of the Health Record
    4. Healthcare Data Sets and Standards
    5. Clinical Vocabularies and Classification Systems
    6. Health Information Functions
    7. Secondary Data Sources

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 1105 - Health Information Statistics

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HHSC 1700 , HHSC 1740 , and ITCS 1010  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1102  and HITT 1106  

    (replaces but does not equate to HITT 1104)

    HITT 1105 discusses the fundamental concepts of the most frequently used health statistics, including vital and descriptive statistics, emphasizing the reliability and validity of data and database issues such as data searching and access.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to generate healthcare statistics and research.

    Objectives:

    1. Abstract and maintain data for clinical indices/databases/registries.
    2. Collect, organize, and present data for quality management, utilization management, risk management, and other related studies.
    3. Compute and interpret healthcare statistics.
    4. Use specialized databases to meet specific organization needs such as medical research and disease registries.
    5. Develop a skilled understanding of descriptive statistics (such as means, frequencies, ranges, percentiles, standard deviations).

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize information and communication technologies.

    Objectives:

    1. Use common software applications such as spreadsheets, databases, word processing, graphics, presentation, email, and so on in the execution of work processes.
    2. Apply knowledge of data base architecture and design (such as data dictionary, data modeling, data warehousing) to meet departmental needs.
    3. Query and generate reports to facilitate information retrieval.
    4. Design and generate reports using appropriate software.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Statistical Terminology and Health Care Data
    2. Data Presentation
    3. Health Care Overview and Patient Data Collection
    4. Mathematical Review
    5. Census
    6. Percent of Occupancy
    7. Length of Stay/Discharge Days
    8. Hospital Mortality Rates
    9. Obstetrical-Related Rates
    10. Autopsy Rates
    11. Miscellaneous Rates
    12. Vital Statistics Data/Rates
    13. Frequency Distribution
    14. Measures of Central Tendency and Variation

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    HITT 1106 - Legal & Ethical Aspects of Health Information Technology

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HHSC 1700 , ITCS 1010 , and HHSC 1740  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1102  and HITT 1105  

     

    (formerly HITT 1103)

    This course covers legal and accreditation issues in health information management, including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA); confidentiality and the right to privacy; the legislative process; the local, state, and federal court systems; legal vocabulary; retention directions; and ethical issues in health care and health information management.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret health record documentation requirements (such as accreditation, certification, licensure).

    Objectives:

    1. Apply current laws, accreditation, licensure, and certification standards related to health information initiatives from the national, state, local, and facility levels.
    2. Participate in the implementation of legal and regulatory requirements related to the health information infrastructure.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify health record monitoring and compliance reporting requirements.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards.
    2. Apply procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulation and standards.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to assess healthcare privacy, confidentiality, legal and ethical issues.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures for access and disclosure of personal health information.
    2. Evaluate release of patient-specific data to authorized users.
    3. Investigate and recommend solutions to privacy issues/problems.
    4. Apply and promote ethical standards of practice.
    5. Apply confidentiality and security measures to protect electronic health information.
    6. Comprehend legislative and regulatory process.
    7. Develop a skilled use of legal terminology.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Introduction to the Fundamentals of Law for Health Informatics
    2. Law and Ethics
    3. Legal Proceedings
    4. Evidence
    5. Tort Law
    6. Corporations, Contracts, and Antitrust Legal Issues
    7. Consent to Treatment
    8. The Legal Health Record
    9. HIPAA Privacy Rule
    10. HIPAA Security Rule
    11. Security Threats and Controls
    12. Patient Rights and Responsibilities
    13. Access, Use, and Disclosure and Release of Health Information
    14. Required Reporting and Mandatory Disclosure Laws
    15. Risk Management and Quality Improvement
    16. Corporate Compliance

    Primary Faculty
    Cellitti, Janet
    Secondary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 1201 - Pathophysiology & Pharmacology Applications in Health Information

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1102 , HITT 1105 , and HITT 1106  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1210 , HITT 1211 , and HITT 1209  

    The course focus is on description of conditions and diseases of the organ systems, including etiology, signs and symptoms, and methods of diagnosis and treatment. Students will build on their knowledge of anatomy and physiology and medical terminology through a detailed study of common pathological conditions and the drugs used in their treatment.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to summarize basic pharmacology concepts.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the processes of pharmaceutical drug regulation and approval.
    2. Identify drug classes, schedules, and categories.
    3. Describe the different methods of drug delivery.
    4. Explain the effects on the body after a drug has been administered.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify biomedical sciences.

    Objectives:

    1. Recognize and recall the normal human anatomy and physiology.
    2. Recognize, recall, and compare a number of diseases.
    3. Recognize and recall common treatments for the diseases covered in the course.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Introduction to Pathophysiology
      1. Drug Legislation
      2. Drug Forms and Routes of Administration
    2. Inflammation and Healing
      1. Immunity and Abnormal Response
      2. Anti-infective Drugs
      3. AIDS and Antiviral Drugs
    3. Skin Disorders
      1. Infection
      2. Dermatologic Drugs
      3. Anti-Fungal Drugs
    4. Substance Abuse
      1. Chronic Neurologic Disorders
      2. Psychiatric Drugs
      3. Drug Effects
      4. Steps in the Drug Cycle
    5. Musculoskeletal Disorders
      1. Musculoskeletal Drugs
    6. Cardiovascular Disorders
      1. Cardiovascular Drugs
    7. Respiratory Disorders
      1. Pulmonary Drugs
    8. Digestive system Disorders
      1. Gastrointestinal Drugs
    9. Blood and Lymphatic Disorders
      1. Urinary System disorders
      2. Anticoagulant Thrombolytic Drugs
      3. Intravenous Fluids and Blood Products
      4. Urinary tract Drugs
    10. Acute Neurological Disorders
      1. Endocrine Disorders
      2. Neurologic Drugs
      3. Endocrine Drugs
      4. Antidiabetic Drugs
    11. Reproductive system Disorders
      1. Disorders of the Eye and Ear
      2. ENT Drugs
      3. Ophthalmic Drugs
    12. Neoplasms
      1. Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Imbalances
      2. Chemotherapy Drugs
    13. Relationship between Pregnancy and Disease
      1. Aging and Disease Processes
      2. Obstetric/Gynecologic Drugs
    14. Pain
      1. Environmental Hazards
      2. Anesthetics
      3. Analgesic Drugs
      4. Emergency Drugs

    Primary Faculty
    Cellitti, Janet
    Secondary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 1209 - International Classification of Disease (ICD)-Beginning Coding

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1102 , HITT 1105 , and HITT 1106  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1201 , HITT 1210 , and HITT 1211  

    (formerly HITT 1209 and HITT 2108)

    HITT 1209 introduces students to the International Classification of Disease (ICD) as used in diagnostic and procedural coding. Laboratory session focuses on the application of the related skills with accuracy and completeness using manual and computerized methods.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify health data structure, content, and standards.

    Objectives:

    1. Students will be able to abstract and maintain data for clinical indices/databases/registries.
    2. Use and maintain applications and processes to support other clinical classification and nomenclature systems.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret guidelines of clinical classification systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Define and discuss coding applications in various health care settings.
    2. Demonstrate ethical application of diagnosis/procedure codes using ICD-10-CM/PCS
    3. Adhere to current regulations and established guidelines in code assignment.
    4. Apply policies and procedures for the use of clinical data required in reimbursement and prospective payment systems (PPS) in healthcare delivery.
    5. Validate coding accuracy using clinical information found in the health record.
    6. Resolve discrepancies between coded data and supporting documentation.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize information and communication technologies.

    Objectives:

    1. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding.
    2. Use specialized software in the completion of HIM processes such as record tracking, release of information, coding, grouping, registries, billing, quality improvement, and imaging.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Format and Conventions and Current Coding Practices
      1. Background of ICD
      2. Introduction of ICD
      3. Conventions of ICD
      4. Uniform Hospital Discharge Data Set
      5. Coding Steps
      6. Coding Guidelines
    2. External Cause of Morbidity Codes
    3. Factors Influencing Health Status and Contact with Health Service
    4. Symptoms, Signs, and Ill-defined Conditions
    5. Infectious and Parasitic Diseases
    6. Endocrine, Nutritional, and Metabolic Diseases
    7. Mental Disorders
    8. Diseases of the Blood and Blood Forming Organs and Certain Disorders Involving the Immune System.
    9. Diseases of the Nervous System and Sense Organs
    10. Diseases of the Respiratory System
    11. Diseases of the Digestive System
    12. Diseases of the Genitourinary System
    13. Diseases of the Skin and Subcutaneous-tissue
    14. Diseases of the Musculoskeletal System and Connective-tissue
    15. Complications of Pregnancy, Childbirth, and the Puerperium
    16. Abortion and Ectopic Pregnancy
    17. Congenital Anomalies
    18. Perinatal Conditions
    19. Diseases of the Circulatory System
    20. Neoplasms
    21. Injuries
    22. Burns
    23. Poisoning, Toxic Effects, Adverse Effects, and Under-dosing of Drugs
    24. Complications of Surgery and Medical Care

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 1210 - Electronic Health Record for HIM

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1102 , HITT 1105 , and HITT 1106  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1201 , HITT 1209 , and HITT 1211  

    This course will introduce the basic concepts of an electronic health record system and provide students with a high level understanding of the functions and uses of a healthcare information system. Students will learn the full scope of electronic health records (EHR) and the basic concepts of information security and organizational principles used in health information management.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to use different types of information and technology.

    Objectives:

    1. Introduce the definition of the Electronic Health Record (EHR) and describe its various components.
    2. Describe the various components of an EHR.
    3. Describe challenges to developing EHRs and how they have evolved to their current state of implementation in hospitals, ambulatory care, and another setting.
    4. Identify various initiatives to promote the adoption of EHR and health information technology (HIT).
    5. Describe the technologies that support the EHR and their impact on HIM functions.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to adhere to governmental requirements and standards.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss monitoring methods for the enforcement of security policies and procedures.
    2. Describe the primary components of the security provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act and extensions by the HITECH Act and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.
    3. Describe the elements of a data security program.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply HIPAA privacy, confidentiality, legal and ethical issues to a health record.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the differences between the terms of confidentiality, privacy, and security.
    2. Discuss the roles of health information management professionals with respect to privacy, security, legal aspects, and data quality in an electronic environment.
    3. Identify the greatest threats to the security of health information.
    4. Discuss methods for minimizing threats to data security.
    5. Describe the general practices used to ensure data and computer security.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the fundamentals of electronic information systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss the major components of an information system.
    2. Describe the major types of information systems.
    3. Distinguish between the purpose and functions of the Medical Information System (MIS), Decision Support System (DSS), Electronic System (ES), and Knowledge Management System (KMS).
    4. Describe the steps in the systems development life cycle.
    5. Identify the three major types of information system applications and their general functions used in healthcare organizations.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Fundamentals of Electronic Information Systems
    2. Introduction to Electronic Health Information Systems
    3. Electronic Health Records
    4. Information Security
    5. Principles of Organization and Work Planning

    Primary Faculty
    Cellitti, Janet
    Secondary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 1211 - Introduction to Health Informatics

    Credit Hours: 2.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1102 , HITT 1105 , and HITT 1106  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 1201 , HITT 1209 , and HITT 1210  

    This course will introduce the student to the basics of healthcare informatics and will focus on the practical applications of research in health information management. The student will be provided real‑life examples of research where they will acquire, manipulate, and analyze the data and then report the results.

    Billable Contact Hours: 2

    When Offered: Winter semester only

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    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to define the field of health informatics.

    Objectives:

    1. Understand the evolution of the field of health informatics.
    2. Identify the health informatics core competencies.
    3. Recognize the terms related to health informatics.
    4. Identify ethical issues associated with health informatics.
    5. Understand the major roles associated with the field of health informatics.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the relationship between data and information.

    Objectives:

    1. Define the components of data dictionary.
    2. Identify types of data.
    3. Explain how health information standards are developed.
    4. Explain secondary uses of healthcare data and information.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to extract patient information from Electronic Health Record (EHR).

    Objectives:

    1. Understand basic SQL commands to select data for reporting and analysis.
    2. Define data mapping and the various types of data maps.
    3. Compare different needs for and methods of data collection.
    4. Define unstructured data and structured data.
    5. Identify the major datasets, classification systems, clinical terminologies, and other standards utilized for secondary use.
    6. Collect data using standard and suitable tools and techniques.
    7. Determine sampling techniques appropriate to the research.
    8. Articulate and effective plan of data collection.
    9. Interpret data and validate information.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply statistics and research to healthcare data.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply data quality principles and practices.
    2. Utilize effective policies, processes, and techniques for data analysis.
    3. Interpret data and validate information.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to generate graphic representation of data.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the purpose of the HIPAA Privacy Rule.
    2. Identify the types of information protected under HIPAA.
    3. Identify uses and disclosures permitted by HIPAA law.
    4. Characterize the differences between validity and reliability.
    5. Design appropriate data presentations.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Foundations of Health Informatics
    2. Understanding Databases
    3. Data and Information
    4. Healthcare Informatics and Decision Making
    5. Data and Information Movement
    6. Using Healthcare Data and Information
    7. Privacy for Healthcare Informatics
    8. Security for Healthcare Informatics
    9. Emerging Technologies

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2105 - Healthcare Reimbursement Systems

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1201 , HITT 1209 , HITT 1210 , and HITT 1211  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2108  and HITT 2109  

    (formerly HITT 2102)

    This course covers the complex financial systems in today’s healthcare environment. The student will obtain insight into how reimbursement systems have made an impact on providers, payers, and consumers. Students will develop skills in coding compliance, revenue cycle management and case mix management.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to distinguish between the various aspects of reimbursement.

    Objectives:

    1. Monitor coding and revenue cycle processes.
    2. Apply policies and procedures for the use of clinical data required in reimbursement and prospective payment systems (PPS) in healthcare delivery.
    3. Support accurate billing through coding, charge master, claims management, and bill reconciliation processes.
    4. Use established guidelines to comply with reimbursement and reporting requirements such as the National Correct Coding Initiative.
    5. Apply policies and procedures to comply with the changing regulations among various payment systems for healthcare services such as Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, and so forth.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to integrate health data structure, content, and standards.

    Objectives:

    1. Collect and maintain health data (such as data elements, data sets, and databases).
    2. Verify timeliness, completeness, accuracy, and appropriateness of data and data sources for patient care, management, billing reports, registries, and/or databases.
    3. Design and generate reports using appropriate software.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply clinical classification systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Ensure accuracy of diagnostic/procedural groupings such as DRG, APC, and so on.
    2. Demonstrate the ability to evaluate data quality, case‐mix analysis, severity of illness, and coding policies and procedures as required.
    3. Compile patient data and perform data quality reviews to validate code assignment and compliance with reporting requirements such as outpatient prospective payment systems.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Healthcare Reimbursement Methodologies
    2. Clinical Coding and Coding Compliance
    3. Voluntary Healthcare Insurance Plans
    4. Government-sponsored Healthcare Programs
    5. Managed Care Plans
    6. Medicare-Medicaid Prospective Payment Systems for Inpatients
    7. Ambulatory and Other Medicare-Medicaid Reimbursement Systems
    8. Medicare-Medicaid Prospective Payment systems for Post-acute Care
    9. Revenue Cycle Management
    10. Value-Based Purchasing

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2108 - International Classification of Disease (ICD)-Intermediate Coding

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1201 , HITT 1209 , HITT 1210 , and HITT 1211  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2105  and HITT 2109  

    (formerly HITT 1209 and HITT 2108)

    HITT 2108 is a continuation of HITT 1209 that emphasizes the development of intermediate skills to code accurately and ethically. Students will gain an understanding of case mix analysis and application of reimbursement policies and procedures. Advanced case studies, along with the computerized encoding software, will be used in this course.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret guidelines of clinical classification systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Use and maintain applications and processes to support other clinical classification and nomenclature systems (such as ICD‐10‐ CM, SNOMED, and so on). (Competency I, C, 7)
    2. Conduct analysis to ensure documentation in the health record supports the diagnosis and reflects the patients progress, clinical findings, and discharge status. (Competency 1, A, 2)
    3. Demonstrate ethical application of diagnosis/procedure codes using ICD‐9‐CM. (Competency I, C, 2)
    4. Adhere to current regulations and established guidelines in code assignment. (Competency I, C, 5)
    5. Discuss the means to resolve coding dilemmas through appropriate channels.
    6. Ensure accuracy of diagnostic/procedural groupings such as DRG, APC. (Competency I, C, 4)
    7. Validate coding accuracy using clinical information found in the health record. (Competency I, C, 6)
    8. Resolve discrepancies between coded data and supporting documentation. (Competency I, C, 8)

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate reimbursement methodologies.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures for the use of clinical data required in reimbursement and prospective payment systems (PPS) in healthcare delivery. (Competency I, D, 1)
    2. Support accurate billing through coding, charge master, claims management, and bill reconciliation processes. (Competency I, D, 2)
    3. Students will use established guidelines to comply with reimbursement and reporting requirements such as the National Correct Coding Initiative. (Competency 1, D, 3)
    4. Compile patient data and perform data quality reviews to validate code assignment and compliance with reporting requirements such as outpatient prospective payment systems. (Competency 1, D, 4)

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize information and communication technologies.

    Objectives:

    1. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding. (Competency I, C, 1)
    2. Use specialized so ware in the completion of HIM processes such as record tracking, release of information, coding, grouping, registries, billing, quality improvement, and imaging. (Competency 4, A, 3)

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Introduction of the Prospective Payment System
    2. Uniform Hospital Discharge Data Set
    3. Coding Quality
    4. Coding Compliance
    5. Case Mix Analysis

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2109 - CPT/HCPCS, Outpatient Coding-Beginning

    Credit Hours: 2.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1201 , HITT 1209 , HITT 1210 , and HITT 1211  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2105  and HITT 2108  

    (formerly HITT 2106)

    This course uses Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) to prepare the student to code various body systems, disease processes and treatments in the outpatient settings. Billing and insurance procedures as well as chargemaster description and maintenance will be addressed. This course uses encoder and grouping software.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Fall semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    OUTCOME 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret guidelines of clinical classification systems.
     
    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding.
    2. Apply procedure codes using Current Procedural Terminology CPT/Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS).
    3. Adhere to current regulations and established guidelines in CPT/HCPCS code assignment.
    4. Use and maintain applications and processes to support other clinical classification and nomenclature systems (such as ICD-10-CM).
    5. Support coding accuracy using clinical information found in the health record.
    6. Resolve discrepancies between coded data and supporting documentation.
    7. Promote ethical standards of practice.

     
    OUTCOME 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret different reimbursement methodologies.
     
    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Apply policies and procedures for the use of clinical data required in reimbursement and prospective payment systems (PPS) in healthcare delivery.
    2. Define and apply classification systems, such as APC’s, as required.
    3. Support accurate billing through coding, chargemaster, claims management, and bill reconciliation process.
    4. Use established guidelines to comply with reimbursement and reporting requirements such as the National Correct Coding Initiative.

     
    OUTCOME 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able utilize information and communication technologies.
     
    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Use specialized software in the completion of HIM processes such as record tracking, release of information, coding, grouping, registries, billing, quality improvement, and imaging.
    2. Use technology, including hardware and software, to ensure data collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of information.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Application to CPT Coding
    2. Application of the CPT System
    3. Modifiers
    4. Surgery - Integumentary
    5. Surgery - Musculoskeletal
    6. Surgery - Respiratory, Cardiovascular
    7. Surgery - Digestive
    8. Surgery - Urinary, Male Genital, Female Genital
    9. Surgery - Endocrine, Nervous, Eye, Auditory
    10. Radiology
    11. Pathology and Laboratory Services
    12. Evaluation and Management
    13. Medicine
    14. Anesthesia
    15. HCPCS Level II
    16. Reimbursement in the Ambulatory Setting

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty
    Iannucci, Jessica
    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2202 - Organizational Performance for Health Information Management Professionals

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 2105 HITT 2108 , and HITT 2109  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2203 , HITT 2204 , and HITT 2208  

    This course is an introduction to quality assessment and improvement techniques. Students will learn about data collection tools, data analysis, reporting methods, quality assessment plans, team development, utilization and resource management, case management, risk management, clinical and critical pathways, project management, and accreditation standards governing a variety of health care organizations. The instruction will cover the organizational structure of the medical staff and its composite members and will provide an overview of a Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations survey schedule. Other issues that may be addressed include practitioner credentialing, information management plans and how they interface with quality assessment efforts, standard performance measures, and practice guidelines.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to compare healthcare information requirements and standards.

    Objectives:

    1. Conduct analysis to ensure documentation in the health record supports the diagnosis and reflects the patients progress, clinical findings, and discharge status.
    2. Monitor and apply organization‐wide health record documentation guidelines.
    3. Apply policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards.
    4. Report compliance findings according to organizational policy.
    5. Maintain the accuracy and completeness of the patient record as defined by organizational policy and external regulations and standards.
    6. Assist in preparing the organization for accreditation, licensing and/or certification surveys.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to prepare healthcare statistics and research.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply Institutional Review Board (IRB) processes and policies.
    2. Use specialized databases to meet specific organization needs such as medical research and disease registries.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to illustrate quality management and performance improvement techniques.

    Objectives:

    1. Collect, organize, and present data for quality management, utilization management, risk management, and other related studies.
    2. Abstract and report data for facility‐wide quality management and performance improvement programs.
    3. Analyze clinical data to identify trends that demonstrate quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize information and communication technologies.

    Objectives:

    1. Use technology, including hardware and software, to ensure data collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of information.
    2. Use common so ware applications such as spreadsheets, databases, word processing, graphics, presentation, e‐mail, and so on in the execution of work processes.
    3. Use quality improvement tools and techniques to monitor, report, and improve processes.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Introduction to Course
    2. Defining a Performance Model
    3. Identifying Improvement Opportunities based on Performance Management
    4. Using Teamwork in Performance Improvement
    5. Aggregating and Analyzing Performance Data
    6. Communicating Performance Improvement
    7. Measuring Customer Satisfaction
    8. Refining the Continuum of Care
    9. Preventing and Controlling Infectious Disease
    10. Decreasing Risk Exposure
    11. Improving the Provisions of Care, Treatment, and Services
    12. Building a Safe Medications Management System
    13. Improving the Care Environment and Life Safety
    14. Developing Staff and Human Resources
    15. Navigating the Accreditation, Certification, or Licensure Process
    16. Managing the Human Side of Change

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2203 - Management for Health Information Management Professionals

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 2105 , HITT 2108 , and HITT 2109  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2202 , HITT 2204 , and HITT 2208  

    This course is an overview of management principles for first line managers in the Health Information Management (HIM) field. Topics covered in the course include motivational theory, leadership, supervisory skills, human resource management, budgeting, ergonomics, marketing HIM services, presentation skills and techniques, professional image and development, HIM departmental performance improvement and appropriate oral and communication skills.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate various organizational resources.

    Objectives:

    1. Use the principles of ergonomics and human factors in work process design.
    2. Apply the fundamentals of team leadership.
    3. Organize and contribute to work teams and committees.
    4. Conduct new staff orientation and training programs.
    5. Conduct continuing education programs.
    6. Monitor staffing levels and productivity standards for health information functions and provide feedback to management and staff regarding performance.
    7. Communicate benchmark staff performance data.
    8. Prioritize job functions and activities.
    9. Make recommendations for items to include in budgets and contracts.
    10. Monitor and order supplies needed for work processes.
    11. Recommend cost‐saving and efficient means of achieving work processes and goals.
    12. Contribute to work plans, policies, procedures, and resource requisitions in relation to job functions.
    13. Conduct privacy and confidentiality training programs.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain management duties.

    Objectives:

    1. Evaluate, counsel and discipline employees.
    2. Describe the appropriate hiring and interview techniques.
    3. Communicate effectively with employees and supervisors verbally and in when form.
    4. Adhere to policies and procedures of a given organization.
    5. Utilize appropriate management tools such as: time management, project management, and organizational charts, etc.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Organizational Adaptation & Survival
    2. Challenge of Change
    3. The Dynamic Environment of Health Care
    4. Leadership and Management
    5. Planning and Decision Making
    6. Organizing and Staffing
    7. Improving Performance & Controlling the Critical Cycle
    8. Budgeting
    9. The Middle Manager
    10. Committee & Teams
    11. Training & Development
    12. Authority, Leadership & Supervision
    13. Human Resources
    14. Communication
    15. Management for the Health Professional

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2204 - Health Information Technology Seminar

    Credit Hours: 1.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 2105 , HITT 2108 , and HITT 2109  all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2202 , HITT 2203 , and HITT 2208  

    This course will assist the student to prepare for the national Registered Health Information Technician examination. The student will develop an individual or group study plan and complete a mock examination. In addition, the course will discuss skills for job searching and interviewing and review the importance of continuing education within the health information management profession.

    Billable Contact Hours: 1

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate the skills necessary to effectively implement job searches.

    Objectives: Students will:

    1. Demonstrate knowledge of resources for search for jobs.
    2. State the primary purpose of a resume.
    3. State the primary purpose of a cover letter.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will develop the skills required for effective job interviewing.

    Objectives: Students will:

    1. Describe the steps in preparing for an interview.
    2. State a purpose of a written follow‐up to an interview.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will apply their knowledge to appropriately prepare for the national registration examination.

    Objectives: Students will:

    1. Identify the elements on the national registration examination. Common Degree Outcomes.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Exam study strategies and resources
    2. Test taking skills
    3. Mock examination
    4. Resume preparation
    5. Applying for a position
    6. Interviewing for a position

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2207 - Professional Practice Experience

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 1102 , HITT 1105 , HITT 1106 HITT 1201 , HITT 1209 , HITT 1210 , and HITT 1211  all with grade C or better

    (replaces but does not equate to HITT 2206)

    Student will demonstrate basic competencies of health information technology in a virtual HIT lab setting. This supervised professional practice experience will provide the students with observation of and interaction with health information functions. The student will also have the opportunity to tour various healthcare facilities. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Students are required to pass this course to progress in the program.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze health data structure, content and standards.

    Objectives:

    1. Collect and maintain health data (such as data elements, data sets, and databases).
    2. Conduct analysis to ensure documentation in the health record supports the diagnosis and reflects the patients progress, clinical findings, and discharge status.
    3. Apply policies and procedures to ensure the accuracy of health data.
    4. Contribute to the definitions for and apply clinical vocabularies and terminologies used in the organization’s health information systems.
    5. Verify timeliness, completeness, accuracy, and appropriateness of data and data sources for patient care, management, billing reports, registries, and/or databases.
    6. Monitor and apply organization‐wide health record documentation guidelines.
    7. Apply policies and procedures to ensure organizational compliance with regulations and standards.
    8. Report compliance findings according to organizational policy.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply healthcare information requirements and standards.

    Objectives:

    1. Maintain the accuracy and completeness of the patient record as defined by organizational policy and external regulations and standards.
    2. Assist in preparing the organization for accreditation, licensing, and/or certification surveys.
    3. Apply information system policies and procedures required by national health information initiatives on the healthcare delivery system.
    4. Apply current laws, accreditation, licensure, and certification standards related to health information initiatives from the national, state, local, and facility levels.
    5. Apply policies and procedures to comply with the changing regulations among various payment systems for healthcare services such as Medicare, Medicaid, managed care, and so forth.
    6. Participate in the implementation of legal and regulatory requirements related to the health information infrastructure.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply clinical classification systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding.
    2. Apply diagnosis/procedure codes using ICD‐10‐CM and ICD‐10‐PCS.
    3. Apply procedure codes using CPT/HCPCS.
    4. Ensure accuracy of diagnostic/procedural groupings such as DRG, APC, and so on.
    5. Adhere to current regulations and established guidelines in code assignment.
    6. Validate coding accuracy using clinical information found in the health record.
    7. Resolve discrepancies between coded data and supporting documentation.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to distinguish reimbursement procedures.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures for the use of clinical data required in reimbursement and prospective payment systems (PPS) in healthcare delivery.
    2. Produce accurate billing through coding, charge master, claims management, and bill reconciliation processes.
    3. Apply established guidelines to comply with reimbursement and reporting requirements such as the National Correct Coding Initiative.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret policies governing healthcare statistics and research.

    Objectives:

    1. Compute and interpret healthcare statistics.
    2. Apply Institutional Review Board (IRB) processes and policies.
    3. Use specialized databases to meet specific organization needs such as medical research and disease registries.

    Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify quality management and performance improvement processes.

    Objectives:

    1. Collect, organize, and present data for quality management, utilization management, risk management, and other related studies.
    2. Abstract and report data for facility‐wide quality management and performance improvement programs.
    3. Analyze clinical data to identify trends that demonstrate quality, safety, and effectiveness of healthcare.
    4. Compile patient data and perform data quality reviews to validate code assignment and compliance with reporting requirements such as outpatient prospective payment systems.
    5. Abstract and maintain data for clinical indices/databases/registries.
    6. Summarize data compiled from audit trail and data quality monitoring programs.

    Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate the healthcare delivery systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Differentiate the roles of various providers and disciplines throughout the continuum of healthcare and respond to their information needs.

    Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to interpret healthcare privacy, confidentiality, legal and ethical issues.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply policies and procedures for access and disclosure of personal health information.
    2. Release patient‐specific data to authorized users.
    3. Maintain user access logs/systems to track access to and disclosure of identifiable patient data.
    4. Conduct privacy and confidentiality training programs.
    5. Investigate and recommend solutions to privacy issues/problems.
    6. Apply and promote ethical standards of practice.
    7. Apply confidentiality and security measures to protect electronic health information.

    Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize information and communication technologies.

    Objectives:

    1. Use technology, including hardware and software, to ensure data collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of information.
    2. Use common software applications such as spreadsheets, databases, word processing, graphics, presentation, e‐mail, and so on in the execution of work processes.
    3. Use specialized software in the completion of HIM processes such as record tracking, release of information, coding, grouping, registries, billing, quality improvement, and imaging.
    4. Apply policies and procedures to the use of networks, including intranet and Internet applications to facilitate the electronic health record (EHR), personal health record (PHR), public health, and other administrative applications.
    5. Apply knowledge of data base architecture and design (such as data dictionary, data modeling, data warehousing) to meet departmental needs.

    Outcome 10: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to utilize data storage and retrieval systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Use appropriate electronic or imaging technology for data/record storage.
    2. Query and generate reports to facilitate information retrieval.
    3. Design and generate reports using appropriate software.
    4. Maintain archival and retrieval systems for patient information stored in multiple formats.
    5. Coordinate, use, and maintain systems for document imaging and storage.

    Outcome 11: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply data security and healthcare information systems.

    Objectives:

    1. Protect data integrity and validity using software or hardware technology.
    2. Apply departmental and organizational data and information system security policies.
    3. Contribute to the design and implementation of risk management, contingency planning, and data recovery procedures.
    4. Participate in the planning, design, selection, implementation, integration, testing, evaluation, and support for organization‐wide information systems.

    Outcome 12: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain various organizational resource skills.

    Objectives:

    1. Apply the fundamentals of team leadership.
    2. Organize and contribute to work teams and committees.
    3. Conduct new staff orientation and training programs.
    4. Conduct continuing education programs.
    5. Monitor staffing levels and productivity standards for health information functions, and provide feedback to management and staff regarding performance.
    6. Communicate benchmark staff performance data.
    7. Prioritize job functions and activities.
    8. Use quality improvement tools and techniques to monitor, report, and improve processes.
    9. Make recommendations for items to include in budgets and contracts.
    10. Monitor and order supplies needed for work processes.
    11. Monitor coding and revenue cycle processes.
    12. Recommend cost‐saving and efficient means of achieving work processes and goals.
    13. Contribute to work plans, policies, procedures, and resource requisitions in relation to job functions.
    14. Use the principles of ergonomics and human factors in work process design.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Release of Information
    2. Retention Regulations
    3. Healthcare information requirements and standards
    4. Data Security
    5. Healthcare security and privacy
    6. CPT coding
    7. ICD-10-CM Coding
    8. ICD-10-PCS Coding

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HITT 2208 - CPT/HCPCS, Outpatient Coding-Intermediate

    Credit Hours: 2.00


    Prerequisites: Admission into the Health Information Technology Program; HITT 2105 , HITT 2108 , and HITT 2109 all with grade C or better

    Corequisites: HITT 2202 , HITT 2203 , and HITT 2204  

    This course continues the use of the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) to prepare the student to code various body systems, disease processes and treatments in the outpatient settings at a more advanced level. Billing and insurance procedures as well as charge-master description and maintenance will be addressed. This course uses encoder and grouping software.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    When Offered: Winter semester only

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    OUTCOME 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to apply guidelines of clinical classification systems.
     
    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Use and maintain electronic applications and work processes to support clinical classification and coding.
    2. Apply procedure codes using Current Procedural Terminology CPT/Healthcare Common Procedure Coding  System (HCPCS).
    3. Adhere to current regulations and established guidelines in code assignment.
    4. Use and maintain applications and processes to support other clinical classification and nomenclature systems (such as ICD-10-CM).
    5. Validate coding accuracy using clinical information found in the health record.
    6. Resolve discrepancies between coded data and supporting documentation.
    7. Apply and promote ethical standards of practice.
    8. Support accurate billing through coding, chargemaster, claims management, and bill reconciliation process.

     
    OUTCOME 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain different reimbursement methodologies.
     
    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Apply policies and procedures for the use of clinical data required in reimbursement and prospective payment systems (PPS) in outpatient healthcare delivery.
    2. Define and apply classification systems, such as APC’s, as required.
    3. Support accurate billing through coding, chargemaster, claims management, and bill reconciliation process.
    4. Use established guidelines to comply with reimbursement and reporting requirements such as the National Correct Coding Initiative.
    5. Compile patient data and perform data quality reviews to validate code assignment and compliance with reporting requirements such as outpatient prospective payment systems.

     
    OUTCOME 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able utilize information and communication technologies.
     
    OBJECTIVES:

    1. Use specialized software in the completion of HIM processes such as record tracking, release of information, coding, grouping, registries, billing, quality improvement, and imaging.
    2. Use technology, including hardware and software, to ensure data collection, storage, analysis, and reporting of information.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. Review of Modifiers
    2. Case scenario practice for the following body systems
      1. Surgery - Integumentary
      2. Surgery - Musculoskeletal
      3. Surgery - Respiratory, Cardiovascular
      4. Surgery - Digestive
      5. Surgery - Urinary, Male Genital, Female Genital
      6. Surgery - Endocrine, Nervous, Eye, Auditory
      7. Radiology
      8. Pathology and Laboratory Services
      9. Evaluation and Management
      10. Medicine
      11. Anesthesia
    3. HCPCS Level II
    4. Reimbursement in the Ambulatory Setting
    5. Charging

    Primary Faculty
    Dunsmore, Kristin
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Primeau, Paula
    Dean
    Mirijanian, Narine



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088


History

  
  •  

    HIST 1260 - Women in European History to 1450

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    A survey of the history of women and their roles (political, economic, social, religious) in European history from prehistory through the Middle Ages including accounts of selected exceptional women, notable and notorious alike, who left their mark on the past.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the role of women in different European/Western Settings.

    Objectives:

    1. Examine the lifestyle of women in pre-Roman times.
    2. Examine the lifestyle of Women during the Roman Period.
    3. Examine the lifestyle of women during Medieval/Dark Ages Europe.
    4. Examine the lifestyle of women during the Early European Renaissance.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of notable/exceptional women making their mark during the designated course time frame.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify notable women relevant to European warfare.
    2. Identify notable women relevant to the development of European culture/intellectualism.
    3. Identify notable women relevant to politics or involved in leadership roles (monarchs, etc.).
    4. Identify notable women relevant to European medicine or science.
    5. Identify notable women relevant to European religion.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of how the accomplishments of Early European women facilitated a more positive diversity in the roles of women in modern times.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss positive moves by women within the public sphere of early Europe.
    2. Discuss the improving view of women within the church.
    3. Discuss the ongoing advances of European women within the realm of intellectualism.
    4. Discuss the affirmative legacies of noted queens, leaders, etc.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Women of Antiquity
    2. Women and the Greek City States
    3. The Role of Women During the Roman Era 500BC-400AD
    4. The Role of Women in the Early Catholic Church
    5. Dark Ages Europe and Femininity 400AD-1300AD
    6. Depictions of Women and Femininity During the Dark Ages
    7. Women in Positions of Leadership (political/military) During the Dark Ages
    8. Women During the Early Renaissance 1350-1450

    Primary Faculty
    Crawford, Tina
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 1270 - Women in European History, 1450‑1848

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    A survey of the history of women and their roles (political, economic, social, religious, cultural) in European history from the Renaissance to the beginning of the women’s movement in 1848 and including accounts of selected exceptional women, notable and notorious alike, who left their mark on the past.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze the world of the Renaissance woman.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the different standards under which men and women operated in the Renaissance Era.
    2. Identify examples of how the Renaissance woman remained resilient in a male dominated world.
    3. Identify examples of the restrictiveness of Renaissance society.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the three distinct stages in the overall struggle of Early Modern European women to achieve equality.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the impact of the Protestant Reformation, the Counter Reformation and the Wars of Religion on the lives of women.
    2. Describe the impact of emerging industrialization within Europe on the lives of women.
    3. Describe the impact of societal revolution within Europe on the lives of women.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the birth of the modern feminist movement as a natural climax of historical processes within Early Modern European history.

    Objectives:

    1. Assess both the reality of women’s lives as well as the success of historical women’s activism by the start of the 19th century, giving particular emphasis to a comparison between the following two revolutionary movements and the respective roles of women:
      1. American Revolution.
      2. French Revolution.
    2. Identify the historical events surrounding the birth of the modern feminist movement.
    3. Identify responses, victories and struggles within the early years of the feminist movement.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Understanding the Reality of Women’s Lives in Early Modern Europe - The World of the Renaissance Woman
      1. The Renaissance Man v. The Renaissance Woman
      2. The Resiliency of Women
        1. Renaissance Female Ruler - The Quandary of Women in a Powerful Societal Position
        2. Education of the Renaissance Woman
      3. The End Result? Few Changes in the Lives of Women
    2. Three Distinct Stages in the Overall Struggle to Achieve Equality (1500-1815)
      1. The Protestant Reformation, the Counter Reformation and the Wars of Religion - The Awakening of European Women (1519-1648)
      2. Emerging Industrialization - Rising Frustration and Activism (1648-1750)
      3. The Revolutionary Era - Ingredients of Feminist Thought Emerge (1750-1815)
        1. The Enlightenment - Intellectualism, liberty and equality
        2. Romanticism - Sexual Politics and Women’s Activism
        3. Industrial Revolution - Abandonment of the Family Economy and Shifting Societal Roles
    3. The Birth of the Feminist Movement (1815-1848)
      1. The Reality of Women’s Lives by the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th century
        1. American Revolution
        2. French Revolution
      2. The First Wave of Feminism
        1. Seneca Falls Convention
        2. Responses, victories and struggles

    Primary Faculty
    Crawford, Tina
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 1400 - History Goes to the Movies

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Explores and evaluates historical fact, fancy and falsehood portrayed in feature films depicting an historical era or specific historical theme; examines historical problems raised by cinematic subjects.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the respective requirements of historical authenticity and dramatic effectiveness in film.

    Objectives:

    1.  Students will describe the requirements of scholars researching the past.
    2. Students will describe the requirements of the makers of films about the past.
    3. Students will describe the complex relationships between scholars and filmmakers.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the legitimacy and pitfalls of feature films addressing problematic historical characters, events, and issues.

    Objectives:

    1. Students will demonstrate critical thinking in evaluating the recreation of historical characters on film.
    2. Students will demonstrate critical thinking in evaluating the recreation of historical events on film.
    3. Students will demonstrate critical thinking in evaluating the recreation of historical issues on film.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. The translation of history onto film
    2. The translation of historical characters onto film
    3. The translation of historical events onto film
    4. The translation of historical issues onto film

    Primary Faculty
    Broyles, Michael
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 1500 - Western Civilization to 1648

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly HIST 1100)

    The evolution of Western Civilization and its development from ancient times through the reformation.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the political, economic, social, spiritual, intellectual, and military histories of the following people:

    Prehistoric man The Greeks

    The people of Mesopotamia The Romans

    The Egyptians The Muslims

    The Hebrews The Europeans of the Middle Ages

    The Phoenicians The European Renaissance

    The Christian Reformation

    Objectives: For each of the above peoples, students will:

    1. Explain and analyze the political history.
    2. Explain and analyze the social history.
    3. Explain and analyze the spiritual history.
    4. Explain and analyze the intellectual history.
    5. Explain and analyze the military history.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of contributions of the following people to the evolution of Western culture:

    Prehistoric man The Greeks

    The people of Mesopotamia The Romans

    The Egyptians The Muslims

    The Hebrews The Europeans of the Middle Ages

    The Phoenicians The European Renaissance

    The Christian Reformation

    Objectives: For each of the above peoples, students will:

    1. Explain and analyze the contributions to the political evolution of Western culture.
    2. Explain and analyze the contributions to the social evolution of Western culture.
    3. Explain and analyze the contributions to the spiritual evolution of Western culture.
    4. Explain and analyze the contributions to the intellectual evolution of Western culture.
    5. Explain and analyze the contributions to the military evolution of Western culture.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Prehistory
    2. Mesopotamia
    3. Egypt
    4. Greece
    5. Rome
    6. Early Middle Ages
    7. Late Middle Ages
    8. Renaissance
    9. Reformation

    Primary Faculty
    Broyles, Michael
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 1600 - Western Civilization Since 1648

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly HIST 1210)

    The people, ideas, and movements, both revolutionary and reactionary that shaped modern western history.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the social, political, economic, and intellectual histories of the following historical eras:

    The Scientific Revolution Socialism and Imperialism
    The Old Regime The Industrial Revolution
    The Enlightenment World War I
    The French Revolution and Napoleon The Age of Dictatorships
    The Congress of Vienna World War II
    The Romantic Era The Cold War
    Nationalism

    Objectives: For each of the above eras, students will:

    1. Explain and analyze the political history.
    2. Explain and analyze the social history.
    3. Explain and analyze the spiritual history.
    4. Explain and analyze the intellectual history.
    5. Explain and analyze the military history.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the impact of the following historical eras on Western culture:

    The Scientific Revolution Socialism and Imperialism
    The Old Regime The Industrial Revolution
    The Enlightenment World War I
    The French Revolution and Napoleon The Age of Dictatorships
    The Congress of Vienna World War II
    The Romantic Era The Cold War
    Nationalism

    Objectives: For each of the above eras, students will:

    1. Explain and analyze the contributions to the political evolution of Western culture.
    2. Explain and analyze the contributions to the social evolution of Western culture.
    3. Explain and analyze the contributions to the spiritual evolution of Western culture.
    4. Explain and analyze the contributions to the intellectual evolution of Western culture.
    5. Explain and analyze the contributions to the military evolution of Western culture.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    Scientific Literacy: YES

    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Scientific Revolution
    2. L’Ancien Regime
    3. Enlightenment
    4. French Revolution and Napoleon
    5. Congress of Vienna
    6. Romantic Era
    7. Nationalism, Socialism, and Imperialism
    8. Industrial Revolution
    9. World War I
    10. Age of Dictatorships
    11. World War II
    12. Cold War

    Primary Faculty
    Broyles, Michael
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    HIST 1700 - The World Since 1945

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    This course focuses on the recovery from World War II, the Cold War, decolonization, the emergence of Asia, the breakup of the Soviet Union, and globalization.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the economic, intellectual, political, and social effects of the following events:

    World War II
    The Cold War
    De-colonization
    The emergence of Asia
    The breakup of the Soviet Union
    Globalization

    Objectives: For each of the above events, students will:

    1. Identify and discuss the economic effects.
    2. Identify and discuss the intellectual effects.
    3. Identify and discuss the political effects.
    4. Identify and discuss the social effects.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the economic, intellectual, political, and social effects of the following events upon World History:

    World War II
    The Cold War
    De-colonization
    The emergence of Asia
    The breakup of the Soviet Union
    Globalization

    Objectives: For each of the above events, students will:

    1. Explain and analyze the economic effects upon World History.
    2. Explain and analyze the intellectual effects upon World History.
    3. Explain and analyze the political effects upon World History.
    4. Explain and analyze the social effects upon World History.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Critical Thinking: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Recovery from World War II
    2. The Cold War
    3. Decolonization
    4. The Emergence of Asia
    5. The Breakup of the Soviet Union
    6. Globalization

    Primary Faculty
    Crawford, Tina
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    HIST 2000 - History of Invention & Technology in America

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    A survey of inventions, their technological application and how they affected American economic, social, and political development.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate an overall knowledge and general competency of the most important American technological inventions.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. List key inventions and technological developments in various areas of American life.
    2. Compare and contrast the impact that key inventions have played in various areas of American life.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate an overall knowledge of the power that technology has possessed in the shaping and development of American history.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. Identify key motivating factors that have influenced key technological development.
    2. Describe the various impacts that these key technologies have had on American industrial life.
    3. Describe the various impacts that these key technologies have had on American economic and political life.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will demonstrate an overall knowledge of the benefits and problems that invention and technology have posed for Americans throughout history.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. Describe the impact (both positive and negative) that key technologies have had on the average American throughout history.
    2. Compare and contrast the benefits and problems that invention and technology posed for Americans in the past with the benefits and problems that invention and technology pose for the average American today.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. American current dominance in global technology and current love affair with all things technological
    2. The rise of America’s dominance and love affair with technology
      1. The historical uniqueness of America’s relationship with technology
      2. The birth of America’s love affair - Colonial life
      3. Independence and the evolution of American technology
        1. Early years and random, uncontrolled but inspiring development
          1. War of 1812 - the beginning of American industrial evolution
          2. 19th century Increasing industrial and technological evolution
          3. Gilded Age - Industrial and technological greatness just around the corner
            1. Impact of the Civil War
            2. Impact of the opening and exploitation of the West
        2. Rocky Road to Industrial Greatness
          1. Industrial greatness and industrial abuses in the Gilded Age
          2. Progressive Era The attempt to control industry and technology
          3. Embracing success in the Roaring 1920s
          4. Great Depression Dealing with the aftermath of the Roaring 20s
        3. Reaching Industrial Greatness
          1. World War II
          2. New superpower status - economic and political
          3. Cold War - the embracing of military technology
    3. The Impact of American technology and industry
      1. Failures of the Cold War
        1. Overuse of technology
        2. Use of technology to sell our ideals
        3. Obsessive consumerism
      2. Legacy of the Cold War
        1. Domestic turmoil
        2. International tensions
        3. Shadow of the Cold War

    Primary Faculty
    Rice, Edward
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 2100 - History of the United States to 1877

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly HIST 2300)

    Broad historical view of development of the United States before 1877.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the varied faces of the North American/US Population from Pre-Columbus times through to the Civil War Era.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss the arrival of the Native Americans.
    2. Discuss the early exploration and settlement of the Spanish Colonies.
    3. Discuss the establishment of the British North America colonies.
    4. Discuss the dynamics involved with Indentured Servitude and African Slavery.
    5. Discuss the settlement of Euro-American settlements, states, and etc

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the rise of the American nation amidst a European backdrop.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain the road to this successful rebellion within the British Empire.
    2. Explain the social, economic, and political dynamics of the American Revolution (1775-1783).
    3. Explain the philosophical and social significance of the Revolutionary Movement.
    4. Explain the varied military actions occurring during the War for Independence.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the initial instability and then later stabilization of the Early Republic (1780-1860).

    Objectives:

    1. Examine the crises experienced within the new nation.
    2. Examine the nature of the Constitution of 1787.
    3. Examine the spread of popular democracy and enfranchisement.
    4. Examine the motivation for territorial expansion.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the nature of Antebellum United States history leading to civil war.

    Objectives:

    1. Discuss the development of the slave based-Southern economy and early manufacturing Northern economy.
    2. Discuss the political partisanship leading up to the Civil War.
    3. Discuss the blossoming Abolitionist movement.
    4. Discuss the effects of modernization upon the antebellum United States.
    5. Discuss the varied faces of civil strife and eventual end to chattel slavery.
    6. Discuss the specific approaches towards postwar Redemption and Reconstruction.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
     

    1. The Pre-Columbus Native Americans/Indigenous Peoples
    2. The Colonization of New Spain
    3. The Establishment of the British North American Colonies 1600-early 1700s
    4. The Realities of Indentured Servitude and African Slavery 1600-1800s
    5. The Road to Resistance, Rebellion, and Open Revolution 1760s-1780
    6. The American Revolution 1775-1783
    7. The Early American Republic 1780-1800
    8. The Rise of the Jeffersonians 1800-1820
    9. The War of 1812 and the Emergence of American Nationalism 1810-1830
    10. The Jacksonian Era 1820-1840
    11. The Mexican War Era 1840-1850
    12. The Slippery Slope towards Civil War and Succession 1850-1860
    13. The American Civil War Era 1860-1865
    14. Reconstruction and Redemption 1865-1877

    Primary Faculty
    Placco, Michael
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 2200 - History of the United States Since 1877

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly HIST 2310)

    A broad historical survey of the emergence of the United States as an industrial nation and world power.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify central themes and events in American history from the end of the Reconstruction period to the present.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Recognize the significance of historical events, individuals/organizations, and topics relevant to the period.
    2. Describe the various social, cultural, political, and economic movements relevant to the period.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to recognize the characteristics of the major historical developments germane to the period.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Explain the effects of specific social, cultural, and economic movements on the United States and its institutions.
    2. Explain the impact of specific political movements, technological/scientific advances, and military activities on the United States and its institutions.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the American experience since 1877 in a global context.

    Objectives: The student will:

    1. Examine America’s relationship with the Western Hemisphere.
    2. Examine America’s relationship with European powers.
    3. Examine America’s relationship with Southeast Asia.
    4. Examine America’s relationship with Africa and the Middle East.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Session and Topic:

    1. The Gilded Age (1877-1901)
    2. American Expansionism (1898-1917)
    3. The Progressive Era (1901-1921)
    4. World War I (1914-1920)
    5. The 1920s and the Great Depression (1920-1933)
    6. Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal (1933-1941)
    7. American Isolationism and World War II (1920-1945)
    8. Cold War Politics under Truman and Eisenhower in the Post-War Era (1945-1961)
    9. American Prosperity and the Culture of Abundance (1945-1961)
    10. Social and Cultural Rebellion and Liberal Reform in the Post-War Era (1945-1968)
    11. The Vietnam War and Cold War Confrontation in the 1960s and 1970s (1961-1975)
    12. The End of Liberalism, the End of the Cold War, and the Rise of the Global Economy (1968-2000)
    13. America in the Twenty-First Century and the Legacy of September 11th (2000-Present)

    Primary Faculty
    Weintz, Elton
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    HIST 2330 - History of American Movies 1896‑1950

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Surveys the development of American Society by viewing movies as part of our popular culture.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the audience attracted to the Nickelodeons.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the concepts of vertical integration, the studio system, and the studio contract system.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the themes of materialism, women’s role, race, and individualism as portrayed in films of the 1920s through the 1950s.

    Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the impact on the movie industry of production code censorship.

    Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to cite the contributions of D.W. Griffith, Alfred Hitchcock, and Billy Wilder to American movies.

    Objectives

    1. Explain motion picture development from Edison to “Sunset Boulevard.”
    2. Explain the contribution of Edwin S. Porter and D.W. Griffith to film art.
    3. Evaluate the Golden Age of Silent Movies and the studio system.
    4. Examine censorship and the emergence of pre-code Hollywood movies.
    5. Describe censorship and the emergence of screwball comedy.
    6. Examine film noir as a reflection of American values.
    7. Analyze the films of Alfred Hitchcock.
    8. Analyze the films of Billy Wilder.
    9. Evaluate the effect of WWII and government anti-trust suits on the movie industry.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Motion Picture development from Edison to “Sunset Boulevard”
    2. The contribution of Edwin S. Porter and D.W. Griffith to film art
    3. The Golden Age of silent movies and the studio system
    4. Censorship and the emergence of pre-code Hollywood movies
    5. Censorship and the emergence of screwball comedy
    6. Film noir as a reflection of American values
    7. The films of Alfred Hitchcock
    8. The films of Billy Wilder
    9. The effect of WWII and government anti-trust suits in the movie industry

    Primary Faculty
    Rice, Edward
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 2340 - Cultural History: American Architecture 1630‑2000

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly HIST 2911)

    The events and personalities that shaped the development of American architectural history from the colonial period to the present including an appreciation of the relationship between America’s history and value system and its architectural traditions.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the events and cultural characteristics that shaped the development of American Architectural History from the colonial period up to the present.

    Objectives:

    1. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Existence” (1630-1720)
    2. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Reason” (1700-1840)
    3. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Emotion” (1830-1880)
    4. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Elegance” (1880-1930)
    5. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Anxiety” (1939-2000)

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the relationship between America’s history and value system and its architectural traditions.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Existence.”
    2. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Reason.”
    3. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Emotion.”
    4. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Elegance.”
    5. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Anxiety.”

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Environment Styles Dates In East Dates In Michigan
      The Age of Existence 1630-1720 Colonial Styles 1630-1700
      1. Concern with existence and religion 1. New England Colonial 1630-1700
      2. Medieval Influence
        Gothic Tendencies
        Natural, functional architecture 2. Southern Colonial 1630-1700
        1. Dutch Colonial 1630-1770
        2. French Colonial 1630-1770 1701-1810
      3. A colonial society 5. Spanish Colonial 1650-1820
      4. A rural society
    2. The Age of Reason 1700-1840 Classical Styles
      1. Mind over matter 1. Georgian 1720-1780
      2. Man controls nature 2. Federal 1780-1820 1830’s
      3. Classical influence: Balance, order, formality 3. Greek Revival 1820-1850 1840’s
      4. An aristocratic society
      5. A rural society
    3. The Age of Emotion 1830-1880 Victorian Styles
      1. Heart over mind 1. Gothic Revival 1830-1860 1850’s
      2. Nature dominates:
        Man escapes into nature
        Transcendentalism 2. Italianate 1850-1870 1860’s
        1. Octagon 1850-1860 1850’s
        2. Second Empire 1865-1880 1870’s
      3. Romantic influence “Picturesque”, informal 5. Victorian Gothic 1870-1890 1870-1890
        1. Ruskinian Gothic 1870’s 1870’s-80’ s
      4. A Democratic society 7. Stick Style 1860-1880 1870’s
      5. A Rural society 8. Queen Anne 1885-1900 1870’s
    4. The Age of Elegance 1880-1930 Eclectic Styles
      1. Practicality vs. “Conspicuous Consumption” 1. French Chateau (Richard Morris Hunt, architect) 1890-1900 1890’s
      2. Reality dominates
        Eclectic Architecture: Reality means archeologically correct copies of European palaces
        Modern Architecture: Reality means honest expression of materials (texture) and functional planning.
      3. Imperial Roman (McKim, Meade & White, architects) 1893-1910 1900-1925
        1. Neo-Georgian (John Russell Pope, architect) 1890-1930 1920’s
        2. Neo-Gothic (Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson architects) 1900-1930 1910-1934
        3. Neo-Tudor Gothic 1900-1930 1910-1930
      4. A plutocratic society” Robber Barons” wish to display their power and wealth 6. Neo-Egyptian 1900-1930 1900-1930
      5. An urban and resort society
        Modern Styles
        1. Shingle Styles 1880-1900 1890’s
        2. Romanesque (H.H. Richardson, architect) 1877-1890 1880’s
        3. The Chicago School (#3, 4, 5) 3. Skyscraper (Louis Sullivan, architect) 1890-1900 1890-1910
        4. Prairie Style (Frank Lloyd Wright, architect) 1893-1910 1910
        5. Bungalow 1900-1930 1910-1925
    5. The Age of Anxiety 1939-2000
      1. Efficiency vs. Nostalgia 1. Cape Cod 1935-1850 1940’s
      2. The “organization” dominates 2. Utopian (Frank Lloyd Wright) 1940-1959 1940-1959
      3. Order vs. Chaos
      4. A brutal and affluent society 3. International Style (Breuer, Gropius, architects) 1935-1950 1935-1955
      5. A suburban society
        1. Glass Box 1946-1960 1950’s
        2. Colonial 1960-1960’ s
        3. Modifications - Glass box 1950’s 1950’s
        4. Sculptural 1950-1960 1950’s-1965
        5. Brutalist 1965-
        6. Neo-Romanesque 1967-1965-
      6. Post modern 1980-1967-

    Primary Faculty
    Rice, Edward
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 2360 - The Changing of America, 1945 to the Present

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    Analysis of the forces that have shaped modern America: the Cold War, the Kennedy years, the Great Society, Vietnam, Watergate, the Energy Crisis, the Conservative Resurgence.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the central themes and events in American history from the end of the Second World War to the present.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. Recognize the significance of historical events, individuals/organizations, and topics relevant to the period.
    2. Identify the various social, cultural, political, and economic movements relevant to the period.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to differentiate between the characteristics of the major historical movements germane to the period.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. Recognize the effects of the Cold War on the United States and its institutions.
    2. Explain the impact of specific social, cultural, and economic movements on the United States and its institutions.
    3. Explain the impact of specific political movements, technological/scientific advances, and military activities on the United States and its institutions.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the American experience in a global context.

    Objectives: The student will

    1. Explain America’s relationship with Europe and the Soviet Union in the post-War era.
    2. Explain America’s relationship with Japan, China and Southeast Asia in the post-War era.
    3. Explain America’s relationship with the Middle East and Africa in the post-War era.
    4. Explain America’s relationship with Latin America and South America in the post-War era.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
    Session and Topic:

    1. America’s Advent to Power (1898-1941)
    2. The Legacy of the Second World War (1941-1945)
    3. Cold War Politics in the Truman Years (1945-1953)
    4. The Politics and Culture of Abundance (1952-1960)
    5. A Decade of Rebellion and Reform (1960-1968)
    6. The Vietnam War and the Limits of Power (1961-1975)
    7. The Retreat from Liberalism, the End of the Cold War, and the Rise of the Global Economy (1976-2000)
    8. America in the Twenty-First Century and the Legacy of September 11th (2000-Present)

    Primary Faculty
    Weintz, Elton
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
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    HIST 2375 - War, Genocide & the Holocaust

    Credit Hours: 4.00


    Prerequisites: None

    (formerly HIST 2913)

    The purpose of this course is to better understand the origins, development, conduct, and legacy of the Holocaust and other genocides that have occurred in the 20th century. It explores the historical, religious, political, cultural, and ideological roots of the systematic and state‑sponsored mass murder by the Nazi’s of millions of Jews, Gypsies, the physically and mentally disabled, homosexuals, political and religious dissidents and the Slavic peoples of Poland and Russia who were portrayed in Nazi propaganda as racially inferior. Although the Holocaust seems far removed from our contemporary experience, it is a defining moment in world history and the archetype of more recent genocides.

    Billable Contact Hours: 4

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the major political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments that contributed to the causes for the Holocaust.

    Objectives:

    1. Identify the origins and development of anti-Semitism and “scientific racism”.
    2. Analyze the causes for the rise and broad acceptance of fascism in Nazi Germany
    3. Explain how racism became institutionalized in Nazi Germany.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to analyze critically why those major political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments contributed to the Holocaust.

    Objectives:

    1. Evaluate the motivations of the perpetrators of the Holocaust.
    2. Identify the psychological and cultural roots of prejudice, racism and hatred in Nazi Germany.
    3. Analyze what enabled individuals collectively and individually to perpetrate mass murder.
    4. Explain why some showed altruism through resistance and others were passive bystanders.
    5. Explain how the use of mass propaganda by the Nazis to influence the German public.

    Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual impact of the Holocaust and the “lessons” that have been drawn by policymakers, politicians, journalists, novelists, commentators, academics, political interest groups, filmmakers, and citizens about the Holocaust.

    Objectives:

    1. Evaluate how the world did or didn’t respond to the Holocaust.
    2. Examine the moral, ethical and legal implications of the Holocaust.
    3. Explain the impact of the Holocaust on collective memory as expressed in literature and film.
    4. Analyze the significance and the importance of the Holocaust for our contemporary world.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Anti-Judaism in Europe before 1800
    2. Anti-Semitism and “Scientific Racism” in Europe in the 1800s and early 1900s
    3. War and Technology in the 20th century: The Emergence of Total War
    4. Genocide in History, 1492-1914
    5. World War I and the Armenian Genocide
    6. Anti-Semitism in the Weimar Republic
    7. The Rise of Fascism and Nazi Germany, 1919-1933
    8. Racial persecution in Nazi Germany, 1933-1939
    9. Nazi Persecution of the Jews in Germany, 1939-1941
    10. Mass Executions of Jews in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, 1941
    11. Genesis of the European-wide “Final Solution”, 1941
    12. The Extermination of European Jews, 1942-1945
    13. International Justice and the Holocaust: The Nuremberg Trials, 1945-1949
    14. Outlawing Genocide: The United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
    15. Genocide in the Era of Ethnic Cleansing, 1990 - Present

    Primary Faculty
    Meyrowitz, Elliott
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

  
  •  

    HIST 2390 - The History of Michigan

    Credit Hours: 3.00


    Prerequisites: None

    A general survey of the historical development of Michigan from the primitive wilderness to the present. The growth of the cultural, economic, political, and social institutions which enhance understanding of Michigan will be studied.

    Billable Contact Hours: 3

    Search for Sections
    OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
    Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the geology, geography, and peoples that formed Michigan.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain and analyze the relationship of the physical environment of Michigan to its cultural development.
    2. Explain and analyze the contributions of the French and British to the history of Michigan.
    3. Explain and analyze the immigration patterns of Michigan and their relationship to the development of Michigan.

    Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the economic, cultural, and political forces that influenced Michigan’s history.

    Objectives:

    1. Explain and analyze Michigan’s entrance into the nation and its role in the Civil War.
    2. Explain and analyze Michigan’s economic evolution and business cycles including: fur trade, farming, lumber, mining, manufacturing, transportation, and automobile industries.
    3. Explain and analyze Michigan’s politics from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.
    4. Explain and analyze the role Michigan played in the world wars of the 20th century.
    5. Explain and analyze of The Great Depression in molding Michigan’s history and culture.
    6. Explain and analyze post World War II Michigan and its contemporary culture.

    COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
    • Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
    • Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
    • Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
    • Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
    • Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
    • Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

    CDO marked YES apply to this course:
    Communication: YES
    Critical Thinking: YES
    Global Literacy: YES
    Information Literacy: YES
    Quantitative Reasoning: YES
    COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

    1. Colonial Developments
      1. Introduction to class
      2. Michigan before the Europeans
      3. The French Period
      4. Rule Britannia
    2. Life in the Territory
      1. Exam One In Class
      2. Troubled Waters
      3. A Beacon in the Night
      4. Michigan in the Civil War
    3. Early Industrial Phase
      1. Boom and Bust
      2. Exam Two In Class
      3. The Automobile in Michigan
      4. The Winds of Change
    4. 4. Modern Industrial State
      1. A Second Beacon in the Night
      2. Change and turmoil and improvement?
      3. Looking to the Future
      4. Exam Three in Class

    Primary Faculty
    Broyles, Michael
    Secondary Faculty

    Associate Dean
    Williams-Chehmani, Angie
    Dean
    Pritchett, Marie



    Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088

 

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