Oct 02, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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SPCH 2550 - Argumentation Debate

Credit Hours: 4.00


Prerequisites: SPCH 1060 

(formerly SPCH 2500)

This course instructs the student in the preparation of resolutions and the development of arguments, evaluation of reasoning including fallacies, and evidence applied to writing formal briefs. Students will use oral communication principles and practices to apply skill for participation in various forms of debate.

Billable Contact Hours: 4

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to present skills based on the objectives of the National Communication Competency Speaking Criteria (NCA).

Objectives:

  1. Provide appropriate oral/written ethical and cited supporting material.
  2. Use language and grammar appropriate to the topic, audience, occasion and context.
  3. Use pronunciation, articulation, and vocal variety in rate, pitch, and intensity to heighten and maintain interest.
  4. Use physical behaviors that support the verbal message.

Outcome 2:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking.

Objectives:

  1. Create classical structures of argument showing evidence of types of reasoning.
  2. Identify obstacles to clear thinking including fallacies.

Outcome 3:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to research policy resolutions.

Objectives:

  1. Choose, narrow, and write a policy resolution for debate appropriately for the audience and the occasion.
  2. Use the resources of the library, expert interviews, and personal experience to obtain information to formulate into evidence cards to be used in structuring arguments.

Outcome 4:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to prepare argumentative, affirmative and negative briefs on a selected policy topic.

Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate critical thinking analysis of the proposition through issues, contentions, arguments, evidence, and proofs applied to affirmative briefs including cases in logical outline style.
  2. Demonstrate critical thinking analysis of the proposition through issues, contentions, arguments, evidence, and proofs applied to negative briefs including cases in logical outline style.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Global Literacy: YES
Information Literacy: YES
COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
TEACHING MODEL: THEORY, SKILL PRACTICE, SKILL PERFORMANCE:

Forming, Norming, Storming, Performing Model
Formation of Cooperative Learning Groups

  1. Unit One - Philosophical Underpinnings
    1. Problem: How are argumentation, critical thinking, and debate used in various forms of decision making?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Definition of Debate
      2. Definition of Critical Thinking
      3. Critical Thinking in a Free Society
      4. Foundation of Debate
      5. Ethical Standards of Debate
      6. Applied and Academic Debate
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  2. Unit Two - Reasoning
    1. Problem: What are the foundations of argument?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Classical Tradition
      2. Classical Structures of Argument
      3. Formal Validity
      4. Types of Reasoning
      5. Obstacles to Clear Thinking
      6. Fallacies of Evidence
      7. Fallacies of Reasoning
      8. Fallacies of Language
      9. Fallacies of Pseudo Arguments
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  3. Unit Three - Ethics of Argumentation
    1. Problem: What does it mean to use ethical and cultural consideration in argumentation and debate?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Ethics
      2. Applied Ethics
      3. Culture
      4. Cultural Studies
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  4. Unit Four - Debate Proposition
    1. Problem: How does one create and analyze a debate proposition?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Define the controversy
      2. Phrase the Debate Proposition
      3. Types of Debate Propositions
      4. Presumption
      5. Burden of Proof
      6. Defining Terms
      7. Methods of Defining Terms
      8. Issues
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  5. Unit Five - Evidence and Proof
    1. Problem: What consists of good evidence and proof?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Definition of Evidence
      2. Definition of Proof
      3. Sources of Evidence
      4. Types of Evidence
      5. Test of Credible Evidence
      6. Tests of Audience Acceptability
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  6. Unit Six - Supporting Materials for Debate
    1. Problem: How does one explore the controversy and provide supporting material?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Review and Generate Ideas
      2. Research Process
      3. Reading with a Purpose
      4. Reading Critically
      5. Recording Materials ‐ Cards
      6. Organizing Materials ‐ Briefs
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  7. Unit Seven - Developing the Affirmative Case
    1. Problem: How does one argue for the proposition
    2. Theory Base
      1. Requirements of the Affirmative Case
      2. Proposition of the Affirmative Cases
      3. Proposition of Policy Affirmative Cases
      4. Plan Format - Planks of Affirmative Cases
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  8. Unit Eight - Developing the Negative Case
    1. Problem: How does one argue for the proposition
    2. Theory Base
      1. Requirements of the Negative Case
      2. Proposition of the Negative Cases
      3. Proposition of Policy Negative Cases
      4. Plan Format - Planks of Negative Cases
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  9. Unit Nine - Debate Styles
    1. Problem: How does one debate the different styles of debate?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Lincoln‐Douglas
      2. Cross‐Examination
      3. Political Campaign Debate
      4. Public Debating
      5. Parliamentary Procedure
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  10. Unit Ten - Refutation and Rebuttal
    1. Problem: How does one refute and rebut
    2. Theory Base
      1. Burden of Rebuttal
      2. Place of Refutation
      3. Preparing for Refutation
      4. Structure of Refutation
      5. Methods of Refutation
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  11. Unit Eleven - Communication Skills of Debate
    1. Problem:
    2. Theory Base
      1. Effective Listening
      2. Dealing with Public Speaking Anxiety
      3. Review of the Elements of Effective Public Speaking
    3. Skill Practice Assessment
    4. Performance
  12. Unit Twelve ‐ Evaluation
    1. Problem: Who won and how?
    2. Theory Base
      1. Evaluating the Debate
        1. Judges
        2. Philosophies
        3. Ballots
      2. Academic Debate Formats
        1. Town Hall Format
        2. Long Table Format
    3. Web Debates
    4. Skill Practice Assessment
    5. Performance

Primary Faculty
McKenney, Janet
Secondary Faculty
Fox, Janice
Associate Dean
Ternullo, Annette
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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