May 17, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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SURG 1265 - Surgical Pharmacology

Credit Hours: 2.00


Prerequisites: Admission into the Surgical Technology Program; ENGL 1180  or ENGL 1210 ; BIOL 2400  or BIOL 2730 ; BIOL 2710 , HHSC 1700 , SURG 1050 , SURG 1060 , and SURG 1070  all with grade C or better, or grade Pass (if the course is a Pass/Fail course); and proof of current AHA/BLS certification

Corequisites: SURG 1055 , SURG 1200 , and SURG 1250  

(formerly SURG 1260)

This course introduces students to medications used in the operating room. An emphasis is placed on classification, administration, forms, methods, interactions, and desired effects of perioperative medications. This course also describes the surgical technologist’s legal responsibilities.

Billable Contact Hours: 2

When Offered: Fall semester only

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate basic mathematic calculations used in the operating room.

Objectives:

  1. Define terminology, abbreviations, and symbols used in basic mathematics and measurement systems.
  2. Use fractions in conversions and calculations
  3. Convert between fractions and decimals

Outcome 2:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to outline the abbreviations used for units of measure in basic pharmacology.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize the abbreviations for the various drugs.
  2. Recognize the abbreviations for units of measure in basic pharmacology.
  3. Read and write roman numerals accurately.
  4. Explain the meaning of percentages.
  5. Explain ratios and proportions.
  6. Summarize different measurement systems with a focus on their uses.

Outcome 3:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to examine various accomplishments in pharmacological history.

Objectives:

  1. Explain the history of pharmacology.
  2. List advances made by key historical figures.

Outcome 4:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to discuss the different agency roles in drug regulation.

Objectives:

  1. Compare federal roles in regulating drugs.
  2. Compare state roles in regulating drugs.

Outcome 5:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to assess the role of the surgical technologist in drug administration, including legal responsibilities associated with administration.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the role of the surgical technologist in medication administration.
  2. Explain the five “rights” of medication administration.
  3. Outline the steps of medication administration.
  4. Discuss aseptic techniques for delivery of medications to the sterile field.
  5. List methods for labeling drugs on the sterile back table.

Outcome 6:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to categorize how various forms of medications are administered in the operating room.

Objectives:

  1. Discuss the drug administration routes used in surgery.
  2. Identify supplies used in medication administration in surgery.

Outcome 7:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to classify perioperative medications.

Objectives:

  1. List drug classification categories.
  2. Identify subcategories in each drug classification
  3. Outline classifications of preoperative medications.

Outcome 8:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to evaluate types of intraoperative anesthesia care.

Objectives:

  1. Describe major types of anesthesia and list applications for each type.
  2. Recognize common agents used in local and regional anesthesia.
  3. Compare and contrast local anesthesia and monitored anesthesia care.
  4. Describe regional blocks and give examples of each.
  5. List the four basic components of a general anesthetic.
  6. Identify agents used for induction of general anesthesia.
  7. Compare and contrast depolarizing and nondepolarizing muscle relaxants.

Outcome 9:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to assess indications for blood and fluid replacement in surgery.

Objectives:

  1. State indications for blood replacement in the surgical patient.
  2. Describe the process of intraoperative autotransfusion.
  3. List blood substitutes in surgery.
  4. List common IV fluids and their purposes in surgery.
  5. Identify fluid electrolytes crucial to hemostasis based on their function.
  6. State objectives of parenteral fluid therapy in surgery.

Outcome 10:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to assess symptoms of toxicity or overdose of perioperative medications.

Objectives:

  1. Identify complications associated with medications.
  2. Describe symptoms of toxicity caused by medication.
  3. Define different types of side effects.
  4. Distinguish between adverse effects and idiosyncratic effects.

Outcome 11:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to determine potential complications associated with anesthesia.

Objectives:

  1. Define terminology related to anesthesia complications.
  2. List potential complications associated with anesthesia.
  3. Discuss the role of the surgical technologist during a malignant hyperthermia crisis.

Outcome 12:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to articulate postoperative care (PACU) of the surgical patient.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the types of monitoring the patient receives in the PACU postoperatively.
  2. Describe the monitoring equipment in PACU.
  3. Discuss elements of discharge planning of the patient.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Critical Thinking: YES
COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
Complete course contents distributed in instructor’s first day handouts.
UNIT I Basic Pharmacology

UNIT II Medication Development Regulation and Resources

UNIT III Pharmacology Math

UNIT IV Mediation Administration

UNIT V Antibiotics

UNIT VI Diagnostic Agents

UNIT VII Diuretics

UNIT VIII Hormones

UNIT IX Medications That Affect Coagulation

UNIT X Ophthalmic Agents

UNIT XI Fluids and Irrigation Solutions

UNIT XII Antineoplastic and Chemotherapy Agents

UNIT XIII Preoperative Medications

UNIT XIV Patient Monitoring and Local and Regional Anesthesia

UNIT XV General Anesthesia

UNIT XVI Emergency Situation


Primary Faculty
Ness, Elizabeth
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Shaw, Andrea
Dean
Mirijanian, Narine



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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