May 17, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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BPEM 1000 - Introduction to Energy

Credit Hours: 4.00


Prerequisites: None

(replaces but does not equate to RNEW 1000 and RNEW 1010)

BPEM 1000 explores energy systems, sustainability, and the future. Topics include various energy sources, forms of energy, world energy consumption, fossil fuels, nuclear energy, electricity generation, costing energy, technologies and applications of renewable energy, and environmental impacts of energy use.

Billable Contact Hours: 6

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to define energy.

Objectives:

  1. Perform basic equations for work, energy, and power.
  2. Recognize and demonstrate understanding of conservation of energy.
  3. Recognize and demonstrate knowledge of potential and kinetic energy.

Outcome 2: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to differentiate between the various forms of energy.

Objectives:

  1. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of electrical energy.
  2. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of chemical energy.
  3. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of nuclear energy.
  4. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of thermal energy.
  5. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of mechanical energy.
  6. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of radiant energy.

Outcome 3: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify the positive and negative consequences of energy and its alternatives as they apply to society, politics, and the environment.

Objectives:

  1. Identify pollution from energy sources.
  2. Describe and demonstrate understanding of impact on climate and weather.
  3. Identify financial issues.
  4. Identify political views.
  5. Define energy storage options.

Outcome 4: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to define renewable energy.

Objectives:

  1. Define direct and indirect energy usage.
  2. Recognize and demonstrate knowledge of present day use of renewable energy.
  3. Define and discuss future potential of renewable resources.

Outcome 5: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to differentiate between the various forms of renewable energy.

Objectives:

  1. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of solar thermal and photovoltaic energy.
  2. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of biomass energy.
  3. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of hydroelectricity.
  4. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of tidal and wave power.
  5. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of wind energy.
  6. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of geothermal energy.
  7. Define and discuss the nature, economics, benefits, drawbacks, and potential of hydrogen fuel cells.

Outcome 6: Upon completion of the course, students will be able to identify the positive and negative consequences involved in the integration of renewable energy.

Objectives:

  1. Describe and demonstrate knowledge of current energy structure and distribution.
  2. Describe and demonstrate knowledge of renewable resource availability.
  3. Identify and discuss transmission and storage issues.
  4. Define and discuss economic considerations.
  5. Describe and discuss potential solutions.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Critical Thinking: YES
Global Literacy: YES
Information Literacy: YES
COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
Weekly Topics

  1. Introduction to Energy
  2. Energy Consumption
  3. Forms of Energy
  4. Fossil Fuels - Exam #1
  5. Heat to Motive Power
  6. Oil and Gas
  7. Secondary Fuels
  8. Midterm Exam - Exam #2
  9. Engines: Diesel, Gas, Stirling
  10. Electricity
  11. Nuclear Power
  12. Renewable Energy - Exam #3
  13. Forms of Renewable Energy
  14. Integration of Renewable Energy
  15. Environmental Concerns & Impact
  16. Review and Final Exam - Exam #4

Primary Faculty
Richter, Lisa
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Pawlowski, Timothy
Dean
Hutchison, Donald



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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