Dec 03, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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OTAS 1361 - Pediatric Occupational Therapy-Lab

Credit Hours: 1.50
Prerequisites: Admission into the Occupational Therapy Assistant Program;  OTAS 1000 OTAS 1012 , OTAS 1110 , OTAS 1210 , OTAS 1230 , and OTAS 1235  all with grade C or better

Corequisites: OTAS 1300 , OTAS 1351 , OTAS 1370 , OTAS 1401 , and OTAS 1420 

This course introduces the student to the screening, evaluation, and interventions commonly used with pediatric clients, in a variety of settings, for occupational performance and participation. The course will emphasize the skills and role of the occupational therapy assistant in medical, educational, and community models of practice. The student will explore normal development implications and applications to pediatric clients of various ages experiencing physical, cognitive, and or psychosocial dysfunction.

Billable Contact Hours: 3

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate acquired competency through:

  1. Comprehension and application of the occupational therapy process with a variety of pediatric populations.
    1. Articulate the differences and similarities of the medical and educational models of pediatric practice.
    2. Distinguish role delineation between the OT/OTA with pediatric practice.
    3. Describe and utilize evidence‐based intervention applied to pediatric practice.
    4. Apply knowledge of interventions developed that are culturally relevant and reflective of current occupational therapy practice based on evidence.
    5. Describe and comprehend skills of collaboration with interprofessional peers and the occupational therapy practitioner.
    6. Describe and demonstrate effective interaction for interprofessional team participation in a variety of pediatric settings.
    7. Demonstrate data gathering for the purpose of screening and evaluation.
    8. Demonstrate data gathering from skilled observations.
    9. Demonstrate the basic use of various types of pediatric assessment tools, and their data generated.
    10. Articulate the role of OT/OTA in the use of pediatric assessment tools.
  2. Comprehension and application of normal development and the application to occupational performance and participation.
    1. Articulate the principles of normal development.
    2. Articulate the characteristics of reflexes and its impact on occupational performance and participation.
    3. Demonstrate and apply knowledge in positioning and handling for a variety of pediatric needs for participation in occupation based activities.
    4. Demonstrate and apply knowledge in basic facilitation and inhibitory techniques for a variety of pediatric needs for participation in occupation based activities.
  3. Basic clinical reasoning skill with occupational therapy interventions for a variety of pediatric dysfunction settings.
    1. Demonstrate basic skill in the selection of appropriate activities to address cognitive, physical and psychosocial deficits.
    2. Demonstrate basic skill in the selection of interventions appropriate for developmental and/or chronological age levels.
    3. Demonstrate development of occupation based intervention methods, plans and strategies for client/parent/caregiver.
    4. Enable ADL performance along the pediatric age spans.
    5. Demonstrate comprehension and application of IADL along pediatric age spans.
    6. Articulate the importance of play and playfulness as a performance area and an intervention method.
    7. Apply the principles of fine motor control, including handwriting skills.
    8. Demonstrate comprehension in sensory processing principles and basic methods for the application to occupational performance and participation.
    9. Demonstrate comprehension of animal assisted intervention with a variety of pediatric clients. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate acquired competency through:
      1. Comprehension and application of the occupational therapy process with a variety of pediatric populations.
        1. Articulate the differences and similarities of the medical and educational models of pediatric practice.
        2. Distinguish role delineation between the OT/OTA with pediatric practice.
        3. Describe and utilize evidence‐based intervention applied to pediatric practice.
        4. Apply knowledge of interventions developed that are culturally relevant and reflective of current occupational therapy practice based on evidence.
        5. Describe and comprehend skills of collaboration with interprofessional peers and the occupational therapy practitioner.
        6. Describe and demonstrate effective interaction for interprofessional team participation in a variety of pediatric settings.
        7. Demonstrate data gathering for the purpose of screening and evaluation.
        8. Demonstrate data gathering from skilled observations.
        9. Demonstrate the basic use of various types of pediatric assessment tools, and their data generated.
        10. Articulate the role of OT/OTA in the use of pediatric assessment tools.
      2. Comprehension and application of normal development and the application to occupational performance and participation.
        1. Articulate the principles of normal development.
        2. Articulate the characteristics of reflexes and its impact on occupational performance and participation.
        3. Demonstrate and apply knowledge in positioning and handling for a variety of pediatric needs for participation in occupation based activities.
        4. Demonstrate and apply knowledge in basic facilitation and inhibitory techniques for a variety of pediatric needs for participation in occupation based activities.
      3. Basic clinical reasoning skill with occupational therapy interventions for a variety of pediatric dysfunction settings.
        1. Demonstrate basic skill in the selection of appropriate activities to address cognitive, physical and psychosocial deficits.
        2. Demonstrate basic skill in the selection of interventions appropriate for developmental and/or chronological age levels.
        3. Demonstrate development of occupation based intervention methods, plans and strategies for client/parent/caregiver.
        4. Enable ADL performance along the pediatric age spans.
        5. Demonstrate comprehension and application of IADL along pediatric age spans.
        6. Articulate the importance of play and playfulness as a performance area and an intervention method.
        7. Apply the principles of fine motor control, including handwriting skills.
        8. Demonstrate comprehension in sensory processing principles and basic methods for the application to occupational performance and participation.
        9. Demonstrate comprehension of animal assisted intervention with a variety of pediatric clients.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Global Literacy: YES
Information Literacy: YES
Quantitative Reasoning: YES
Scientific Literacy: YES

COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
 

  1. Intervention Models for Pediatric Occupational Therapy
    1. Medical model of practice
    2. Educational model of practice
      1. Least restrictive environment
      2. Individual educational plan (IEP)
      3. Role of occupational therapy
        1. Direct service
        2. Monitoring service
        3. Consultation services
    3. Role delineation of the OT and OTA
    4. Need for current evidence‐based intervention
    5. Intervention applied to the practice framework
    6. Interprofessional communications and collaboration
  2. Assessment Tools and Processes
    1. Purposes of gathering data
      1. Screening and evaluation
      2. Observation skills
      3. Standardized assessments
      4. Application purposes of measurable data gathered
    2. Types of assessments
      1. Assessments of development
      2. Gross motor development
      3. Fine motor and perceptual
      4. Sensory processing
    3. Role of OT and OTA
  3. Normal Development and Gaining Occupational Skills
    1. Infancy, early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence
      1. Motor development
      2. Process/cognition development
      3. Communication and interaction/psychosocial development
    2. Principles and characteristics
      1. Reflexes and reactions
        1. Rooting
        2. Sucking and swallowing
        3. Moro
        4. Palmar grasp
        5. Plantar grasp
        6. Asymmetrical tonic neck reflex
        7. Symmetrical tonic neck reflex
        8. Righting reactions
        9. Equilibrium reactions
        10. Protective extension reactions
    3. Cultural implications of development
    4. Observations and applications in CNS development
    5. Applications to dysfunction across pediatric age spans
  4. Positioning and handling
    1. Definitions and purpose
      1. Skeletal alignment
      2. Typical development
      3. Perception and body awareness
    2. Principles
    3. Indicators for use
    4. Applications to dysfunction
    5. Applications to occupational performance and participation
      1. Prone position
      2. Supine position
      3. Prone on elbow and prone on extended arms position
      4. Side‐lying
      5. Sitting position
      6. Mobility
        1. Wheelchairs
      7. Standing position
    6. Facilitatory techniques
    7. Inhibition techniques
  5. Interventions
    1. Evidence‐based intervention
    2. Selecting activity and intervention methods
      1. Chronological versus developmental age
    3. Working with parents and caregivers
      1. Communication strategies
      2. Teaching strategies
    4. ADL intervention strategies
      1. Feeding and eating skills
        1. Oral motor development
        2. Eating and swallowing
        3. Training of others in precautions and techniques, including assistive devices and preparatory techniques
      2. Dressing and undressing
        1. Age appropriate skills
      3. Personal hygiene and grooming
      4. Bathing and showering
      5. Toilet hygiene
      6. Functional mobility
      7. Sexual activity
      8. Strategies and teaching child and caregiver/parent
    5. IADL
      1. Cognitive and executive functioning
      2. Age appropriate readiness skills
        1. Home management
        2. Community mobility
        3. Care of others
        4. Communication
        5. Financial management, shopping and care of pets
        6. Safety procedures and emergency responses
      3. Strategies and teaching child and caregiver/parent
    6. Education
      1. Readiness skills
        1. Kindergarten
        2. Elementary school
        3. Middle childhood and adolescence
    7. Play and playfulness/leisure
      1. Skill acquisition
        1. Infancy
        2. Early childhood
        3. Middle childhood
        4. Adolescence
      2. Play as an occupation
      3. Play as an intervention method
      4. Age appropriate interventions
      5. Skills of the practitioner
    8. Fine motor skills
      1. Developmental sequence
        1. Bilateral control
        2. Reaching, grasping, releasing and fine motor development
        3. Object manipulation
        4. Implement usage skills
          1. Progression of implement usage
      2. Application to handwriting skills
        1. Prewriting
        2. Grasp patterns
        3. Writing readiness
        4. Evaluation and assessment
        5. Classroom observation
        6. Interventions
    9. Sensory processing/integration
      1. Screening and assessment
      2. Sensory modulation disorder
      3. Sensory‐based movement disorder
      4. Intervention strategies
    10. Animal assisted services
      1. Definition and purposes
      2. Hippotherapy
      3. Small animals
      4. Large animals
      5. Incorporating animals into pediatric practice

Primary Faculty
Seefried, Mariea
Secondary Faculty
Wysocki, Pennie
Associate Dean
Primeau, Paula
Dean
Mirijanian, Narine



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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