Aug 07, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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HIST 2340 - Cultural History: American Architecture 1630‑2000

Credit Hours: 3.00


Prerequisites: None

(formerly HIST 2911)

The events and personalities that shaped the development of American architectural history from the colonial period to the present including an appreciation of the relationship between America’s history and value system and its architectural traditions.

Billable Contact Hours: 3

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to identify the events and cultural characteristics that shaped the development of American Architectural History from the colonial period up to the present.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Existence” (1630-1720)
  2. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Reason” (1700-1840)
  3. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Emotion” (1830-1880)
  4. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Elegance” (1880-1930)
  5. Describe the characteristics of the “Age of Anxiety” (1939-2000)

Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the relationship between America’s history and value system and its architectural traditions.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Existence.”
  2. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Reason.”
  3. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Emotion.”
  4. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Elegance.”
  5. Identify the significant architectural styles associated with the “Age of Anxiety.”

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Information Literacy: YES
Quantitative Reasoning: YES
COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

  1. Environment Styles Dates In East Dates In Michigan
    The Age of Existence 1630-1720 Colonial Styles 1630-1700
    1. Concern with existence and religion 1. New England Colonial 1630-1700
    2. Medieval Influence
      Gothic Tendencies
      Natural, functional architecture 2. Southern Colonial 1630-1700
      1. Dutch Colonial 1630-1770
      2. French Colonial 1630-1770 1701-1810
    3. A colonial society 5. Spanish Colonial 1650-1820
    4. A rural society
  2. The Age of Reason 1700-1840 Classical Styles
    1. Mind over matter 1. Georgian 1720-1780
    2. Man controls nature 2. Federal 1780-1820 1830’s
    3. Classical influence: Balance, order, formality 3. Greek Revival 1820-1850 1840’s
    4. An aristocratic society
    5. A rural society
  3. The Age of Emotion 1830-1880 Victorian Styles
    1. Heart over mind 1. Gothic Revival 1830-1860 1850’s
    2. Nature dominates:
      Man escapes into nature
      Transcendentalism 2. Italianate 1850-1870 1860’s
      1. Octagon 1850-1860 1850’s
      2. Second Empire 1865-1880 1870’s
    3. Romantic influence “Picturesque”, informal 5. Victorian Gothic 1870-1890 1870-1890
      1. Ruskinian Gothic 1870’s 1870’s-80’ s
    4. A Democratic society 7. Stick Style 1860-1880 1870’s
    5. A Rural society 8. Queen Anne 1885-1900 1870’s
  4. The Age of Elegance 1880-1930 Eclectic Styles
    1. Practicality vs. “Conspicuous Consumption” 1. French Chateau (Richard Morris Hunt, architect) 1890-1900 1890’s
    2. Reality dominates
      Eclectic Architecture: Reality means archeologically correct copies of European palaces
      Modern Architecture: Reality means honest expression of materials (texture) and functional planning.
    3. Imperial Roman (McKim, Meade & White, architects) 1893-1910 1900-1925
      1. Neo-Georgian (John Russell Pope, architect) 1890-1930 1920’s
      2. Neo-Gothic (Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson architects) 1900-1930 1910-1934
      3. Neo-Tudor Gothic 1900-1930 1910-1930
    4. A plutocratic society” Robber Barons” wish to display their power and wealth 6. Neo-Egyptian 1900-1930 1900-1930
    5. An urban and resort society
      Modern Styles
      1. Shingle Styles 1880-1900 1890’s
      2. Romanesque (H.H. Richardson, architect) 1877-1890 1880’s
      3. The Chicago School (#3, 4, 5) 3. Skyscraper (Louis Sullivan, architect) 1890-1900 1890-1910
      4. Prairie Style (Frank Lloyd Wright, architect) 1893-1910 1910
      5. Bungalow 1900-1930 1910-1925
  5. The Age of Anxiety 1939-2000
    1. Efficiency vs. Nostalgia 1. Cape Cod 1935-1850 1940’s
    2. The “organization” dominates 2. Utopian (Frank Lloyd Wright) 1940-1959 1940-1959
    3. Order vs. Chaos
    4. A brutal and affluent society 3. International Style (Breuer, Gropius, architects) 1935-1950 1935-1955
    5. A suburban society
      1. Glass Box 1946-1960 1950’s
      2. Colonial 1960-1960’ s
      3. Modifications - Glass box 1950’s 1950’s
      4. Sculptural 1950-1960 1950’s-1965
      5. Brutalist 1965-
      6. Neo-Romanesque 1967-1965-
    6. Post modern 1980-1967-

Primary Faculty
Rice, Edward
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Williams-Chehmani, Angie
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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