May 17, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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HIST 2330 - History of American Movies 1896‑1950

Credit Hours: 3.00


Prerequisites: None

Surveys the development of American Society by viewing movies as part of our popular culture.

Billable Contact Hours: 3

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the audience attracted to the Nickelodeons.

Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain the concepts of vertical integration, the studio system, and the studio contract system.

Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the themes of materialism, women’s role, race, and individualism as portrayed in films of the 1920s through the 1950s.

Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the impact on the movie industry of production code censorship.

Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to cite the contributions of D.W. Griffith, Alfred Hitchcock, and Billy Wilder to American movies.

Objectives

  1. Explain motion picture development from Edison to “Sunset Boulevard.”
  2. Explain the contribution of Edwin S. Porter and D.W. Griffith to film art.
  3. Evaluate the Golden Age of Silent Movies and the studio system.
  4. Examine censorship and the emergence of pre-code Hollywood movies.
  5. Describe censorship and the emergence of screwball comedy.
  6. Examine film noir as a reflection of American values.
  7. Analyze the films of Alfred Hitchcock.
  8. Analyze the films of Billy Wilder.
  9. Evaluate the effect of WWII and government anti-trust suits on the movie industry.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Global Literacy: YES
Information Literacy: YES
Quantitative Reasoning: YES
COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

  1. Motion Picture development from Edison to “Sunset Boulevard”
  2. The contribution of Edwin S. Porter and D.W. Griffith to film art
  3. The Golden Age of silent movies and the studio system
  4. Censorship and the emergence of pre-code Hollywood movies
  5. Censorship and the emergence of screwball comedy
  6. Film noir as a reflection of American values
  7. The films of Alfred Hitchcock
  8. The films of Billy Wilder
  9. The effect of WWII and government anti-trust suits in the movie industry

Primary Faculty
Rice, Edward
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Williams-Chehmani, Angie
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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