Aug 14, 2022  
College Catalog 2022-2023 
    
College Catalog 2022-2023
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PHYS 1190 - College Physics 2

Credit Hours: 4.00


Prerequisites: PHYS 1180  with grade C or better

(formerly PHYS 1170)

The second of a two‑semester sequence of algebra‑based courses designed to present the fundamental principles of physics including thermodynamics, electricity, waves, and optics. The student will also perform integrated experiments dealing with the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, waves, and optics.

Billable Contact Hours: 6

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Transfer Possibilities
Michigan Transfer Network (MiTransfer) - Utilize this website to easily search how your credits transfer to colleges and universities.
OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the scientific process as related to the physics of scientific laws, models, and theories relating to the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, and wave phenomena.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the laws, models, or theories that are applicable.
  2. Describe the physical laws, models, and theories.
  3. Analyze and apply the physical laws, models and theories.
  4. Assess (or Evaluate) the testability of a hypothesis.
  5. Develop appropriate physical hypotheses.
  6. Analyze and interpret the success or failure of physical hypotheses.

Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to gain a familiarization with the scientist’s usage of specialized, scientific vocabulary relating to the physics scientific laws, models, and theories relating to the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, and wave phenomena.

Objectives:

  1. Define terminology.
  2. Recall terminology.
  3. Employ terminology.

Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explore preconceptions concerning physical interactions and develop conceptual changes to reflect basic physics concepts relating to the physics scientific laws, models, and theories relating to the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, and wave phenomena.

Objectives:

  1. Differentiate between intuitive expectations and established scientific principles through classroom discussion and laboratory exercises.
  2. Through lab experiments students will compare experimental results with preconceived notions.

Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to gain experience in constructing both qualitative representations and then mathematical representations of physical situations relating to the physics of scientific laws, models, and theories relating to the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, waves, and wave phenomena.

Objectives:

  1. Employ coordinate systems to analyze dynamic and static situations.
  2. Apply dimensional and unit analysis to give meaning to, and to communicate measurements.
  3. Construct free body diagrams to demonstrate an understanding of various physical situations.
  4. Draw/sketch vectors to demonstrate an understanding of various physical situations.
  5. Students will utilize various mathematical methods (i.e. vector, algebra, simultaneous linear equations, quadratic equations, etc.) to solve mathematical equations as related to various physical situations.
  6. Derive mathematical equations to describe, and explain, dynamic and static situations.
  7. Assess the reasonableness of final mathematical solutions.
  8. Organize ideas to communicate understanding of mathematical and conceptual physics

Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to gain experience in taking accurate data, organizing and analyzing this data dealing with experiments relating to the physics of scientific laws, models, and theories relating to the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, waves, and wave phenomena.

Objectives:

  1. Collect data through experimentation and observation.
  2. Utilize various measuring instruments to collect data.
  3. Analyze and interpret data to arrive at a conclusion.
  4. Reproduce results that are commonly accepted.
  5. Based upon current theoretical models make predictions about experimental outcomes.
  6. Compare experimental conclusions to theoretical predictions.
  7. Organize results and conclusions to communicate understanding of mathematical and conceptual physics.

Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to gain a historical perspective of the development of science and scientific laws relating to the physics of scientific laws, models, and theories relating to the physics of thermodynamics, electricity, waves, and wave phenomena.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the historical laws, models, and theories.
  2. Describe the historical laws, models, and theories.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Quantitative Reasoning: YES
Scientific Literacy: YES

COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
Lecture

  1. Introduction to Thermodynamics
    1. Internal Energy
    2. Internal Energy as Microscopic Energy
    3. Heat
    4. Equivalence of Heat and Work -The First Law of Thermodynamics
    5. The Second Law of Thermodynamics & The Concept of Temperature
    6. Thermometers
    7. Scales of Temperature
    8. Specific Heats
    9. Calorimetry
    10. Latent Heat
    11. Thermal Expansion
    12. Heat Transfer by Conduction, Convection, and Radiation
    13. Perpetual Motion Machines
  2. Physics of Gases
    1. Macroscopic Description of a Gas
    2. Behavior of Gases
    3. The Ideal-Gas Law
    4. Equations of State
    5. Molecular Model of an Ideal Gas
    6. Brownian Motion
    7. Kinetic Theory of an Ideal Gas
    8. Molecular Motion in Gases
    9. Specific Heats of an Ideal Gas
    10. Thermodynamic Processes in an Ideal Gas
    11. Adiabatic Processes in an Ideal Gas
  3. Electric Forces
    1. Electrostatics and the Electric Charge
    2. Elementary Electric Charges
    3. Charging by Contact and Induction
    4. Conservation of Charge
    5. Coulomb’s Law of Electric Force
    6. Vector Addition of Electric Force Vectors using Components
  4. Electric Fields and Electric Potential Energy
    1. Electric Fields
    2. Vector Addition of Electric Fields using Components
    3. Millikan’s Oil-Drop Experiment
    4. Electric Potential Energy
  5. Electric Potential
    1. Electric Potential
    2. Electric Potential in the Field of Point Charges
    3. Electric Field Lines
    4. Electric Field Maps
    5. Relation Between Electric Field Strength and Potential
    6. Electric Acceleration of Charged Particles
  6. Electric Current
    1. Electric Current
    2. Continuity of Current
    3. Sources of Electromotive Force
    4. Resistance and Ohm’s Law
    5. A Microscopic View of Resistance
    6. Resistivity
    7. Variation of Resistivity with Temperature-Superconductivity
    8. Transfer of Energy and Power by electric current
  7. Electric Circuits
    1. Diagrams of Electric Circuits
    2. Resistors Connected in Series or in Parallels
    3. Open Circuits and Short Circuits
    4. Measurements Using Ammeters and Voltmeters
    5. Household Electric Circuits
    6. Direct Current Networks - Kirchhoff’s Rules
  8. Normal Modes of Oscillation. Sound Waves
    1. Some Properties of Waves
    2. Waves on a Taut String
    3. Standing Waves on a String
    4. Normal Modes and Normal Frequencies
    5. Sound Waves in Air
    6. Intensity of Sound
    7. Energy Content of Waves
    8. The Sound Spectrum
    9. Sources of Sound Waves
    10. Standing Waves in an Air Column
    11. Sound and Music
    12. Resonance and Beats in Sound Waves
  9. Light Waves
    1. Diffraction by a Single Slit
    2. Interference of Waves
    3. Young’s Experiment
    4. The Nature of Light Electromagnetic Waves
    5. The Electromagnetic Spectrum
    6. Measurements of the Speed of Light
    7. Index of Refraction
    8. Diffraction of Light by a Grating
    9. Explanation of Diffraction by a Grating
  10. Reflection and Refraction of Light
    1. Models for Light
    2. Types of Reflecting Surfaces
    3. Laws of Reflection and Refraction
    4. Total Internal Reflection-Critical Angle & Fiber Optics
    5. Dispersion - Refraction by a Prism
  11. Mirrors and Lenses
    1. Objects and Images
    2. Image Formation by Convex Mirrors
    3. Image Formation by Concave Mirrors
    4. Image Formation by Thin Lenses

Lab

  1. Specific Heat
    1. Latent Heat of Fusion
    2. Latent Heat Vaporization
    3. Linear Expansion
  2. Absolute Zero
    1. Cp/Cv of Gases
  3. Electrostatics
    1. Electric Field Mapping
    2. Ohm’s Law
    3. Resistances in Circuits
    4. Series & Parallel Circuits
    5. Kirchhoff’s Rules
  4. Double Slit Interference Using a He-Ne Laser
  5. Normal Modes of Oscillation Speed of Sound
  6. The Laws of Reflection and Refraction
    1. Focal Length of Thin Lenses

Primary Faculty
Fey, Francette
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Young, Randall
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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