Jan 29, 2022  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022
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ENGL 2710 - American Literature: Colonial to 1865

Credit Hours: 3.00


Prerequisites: ENGL 1220  or ENGL 1190 

This course begins with the earliest American literature written by Native Americans and moves on to European expectations, settlements, and explorations of the “New World.” It also covers the literature of the American Revolution, the literary life of the new nation, and culminates in the voices of American Romanticism and anti-slavery reform. Authors to be covered may include Bradford, Winthrop, Edwards, Bradstreet, Franklin, Wheatley, Jefferson, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Stowe, and Douglass.

Billable Contact Hours: 3

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the multi‐cultural origins of American literature.

Objectives:

  1. Recognize and analyze the literature of exploration.
  2. Recognize and analyze Native American stories and myths.

Outcome 2:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of Puritanism.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the cultural environment from which Puritanism emerged.
  2. Analyze/distinguish among the specific forms of this literature: sermon, poetry, historical narratives, spiritual autobiography.

Outcome 3:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the literature of the 18th century.

Objectives:

  1. Analyze the cultural environment from which this literature emerged.
  2. Analyze the Age of Enlightenment as expressed through the political writings of the American Revolution.
  3. Analyze the Age of Enlightenment as expressed through the growth of autobiography.

Outcome 4:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the concepts of Romanticism.

Objectives:

  1. Analyze the cultural environment from which this literature emerged.
  2. Explain the rise of the narrative form.
  3. Identify/explain Transcendentalism and its characteristics.

Outcome 5:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the literature arising from the debate over slavery.

Objectives:

  1. Explain the cultural environment from which this literature arose.
  2. Identify and analyze abolitionist literature.
  3. Analyze slave narratives.

Outcome 6:
Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to write literary analysis papers using correct MLA documentation format.

Objectives:

  1. Shape a controlling idea for each paper, stated in an introduction.
  2. Develop the controlling idea for each paper in a body, using appropriate support and evidence.
  3. Organize each paper appropriately, unifying paragraphs by means of topic sentences, linking paragraphs by a variety of transitions, and arranging the main points effectively.
  4. Summarize the controlling idea of each paper in a conclusion.
  5. Document sources used for each paper according to acceptable MLA format.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Global Literacy: YES
Information Literacy: YES
COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

  1. Native American literary tradition
    1. Oral narrative
    2. Oral poetry
  2. Literature of exploration
    1. New Spain
    2. New France
    3. Chesapeake
  3. Puritanism
    1. Historical narrative
    2. Spiritual autobiography
    3. Sermons
    4. Poetry
  4. Eighteenth Century literature
    1. Age of Enlightenment
    2. Political writings of the American Revolution
    3. Growth of autobiography
  5. Romanticism
    1. Rise of the narrative form
    2. Transcendentalism
  6. The debate over slavery
    1. Abolitionist literature
    2. Slave narratives

Primary Faculty
Brinker, Ludger
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Ternullo, Annette
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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