Nov 26, 2021  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022
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CHEM 1180 - General Chemistry 2

Credit Hours: 4.00


Prerequisites: CHEM 1170  with grade C or better

A continuation of CHEM 1170 with emphasis on kinetics, chemical equilibrium of gaseous and aqueous environments, acid-base interactions, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and coordination compounds. The laboratory component develops more independent skills as students plan and implement a series of qualitative semimicro analyses of ions in addition to demonstrating lecture concepts.

Billable Contact Hours: 7

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of general equilibrium principles.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Perform calculations based on the equilibrium constant.
  2. Apply LeChatelier’s Principle to describe reaction changes at equilibrium.
  3. Understand and relate Kp and Kc.

Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of acids and bases in an aqueous environment.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Describe the chemistry of acids and bases primarily using the Bronsted-Lowry model.
  2. Relate acid/base strengths based on structural information.
  3. Write and apply neutralization reactions.
  4. Interpret the pH scale.

Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of acid/base equilibria.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Calculate the pH of weak and strong acids and bases.
  2. Perform strong acid/strong base titration calculations.
  3. Perform weak acid/strong base titration calculations.
  4. Analyze and solve buffer system problems.

Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of solubility product and complex formation equilibria.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Evaluate the relationship between Ksp and solubility.
  2. Predict precipitate formation based on ion concentrations.
  3. Evaluate the relationship between free metal ion concentration in a solution of metal ion complex.

Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of reaction kinetics.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Evaluate potential energy diagrams.
  2. Derive rate laws based on empirical information.
  3. Apply integrated rate-concentration equations for 1st and 2nd order reactions.
  4. Describe how various factors affect reaction rate.
  5. Relate consumption and production rates stoichiometrically.

Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of thermodynamics as it relates to chemical equilibria.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Describe and relate enthalpy, entropy, and Gibb’s Free Energy.
  2. Understand how enthalpy and entropy affect reaction spontaneity.
  3. Calculate enthalpy, entropy, and Gibb’s Free Energy for reactions.
  4. Evaluate relationship between the equilibrium constant and Gibb’s Free energy.

Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of nuclear chemistry.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Write and balance decay and bombardment reactions.
  2. Predict outcomes of common nuclear decay processes.
  3. Determine mass and energy changes in the atom during decay processes.
  4. Relate changes in number of radioactive nuclei with time.

Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of electrochemistry.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Explain the role of all parts of a voltaic cell.
  2. Balance oxidation-reduction reactions in acid or base environment.
  3. Calculate the standard cell potential for an oxidation-reduction reaction.
  4. Apply the Nernst equation to non-standard voltaic conditions.
  5. Calculate reaction outcomes for electrolytic cells.

Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of transition metal complexes.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Name transition metal complexes.
  2. Apply crystal field theory.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Information Literacy: YES
Quantitative Reasoning: YES
Scientific Literacy: YES

COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

  1. Rates of Reaction
    1. Determination of Rate
    2. Change of Rate with Concentration and Temperature
    3. Collision Theory
    4. Transition-State Theory
    5. Arrhenius Equation
  2. Chemical Equilibrium
    1. Equilibrium Constant
    2. Heterogeneous Equilibria
    3. Qualitative Interpretation of Equilibrium Constant
    4. Le Chatelier’s Principle
  3. Acids and Bases
    1. Definitions of Acids and Bases
    2. Strengths of Acids and Bases
    3. Self-Ionization of Water
    4. Solutions of a Strong Acid or Base
    5. pH of a Solution
  4. Acid-Base Equilibria
    1. Acid-Ionization Constant
    2. Polyprotic Acids
    3. Base-Ionization Constant
    4. Salt Solutions
    5. Common-Ion Effect
    6. Buffers
    7. Acid-Base Titration Curves
  5. Solubility
    1. Solubility Product Constant
    2. Solubility and Common-Ion Effect
    3. Precipitation
    4. Effect of pH on Solubility
  6. Complex-Ions
    1. Complex-Ion Formation Constant
    2. Complex-Ion Dissociation Constant
    3. Complex-Ions and Solubility
    4. Qualitative Analysis of Metal Ions
  7. Thermodynamics
    1. First Law of Thermodynamics
    2. Second Law of Thermodynamics
    3. Third Law of Thermodynamics
    4. Free Energy
    5. Relationship between Free Energy and Equilibrium Constant
    6. Affect of Temperature on Free Energy
  8. Electrochemistry
    1. Balancing Redox Reactions in Acidic and Basic Solutions
    2. Voltaic Cells
    3. emf
    4. Standard Electrode Potentials
    5. Equilibrium Constants and emf
    6. Nernst Equation
    7. Electrolysis
    8. Stoichiometric Calculations of Electrolytic Cells
  9. Nuclear Chemistry
    1. Radioactivity
    2. Nuclear Bombardment Reactions
    3. Detection of Radiation
    4. Effects of Radiation
    5. Applications of Radioactive Isotopes
    6. Mass-Energy Calculations
    7. Nuclear Fission
    8. Nuclear Fusion
  10. Coordination Compounds
    1. Characteristics of Transition Elements
    2. Chemistry of Transition Elements
    3. Formation of Complexes
    4. Structure of Complexes
    5. Nomenclature of Coordination Compounds
    6. Isomerism of Coordination Compounds
    7. Valence Bond Theory of Complexes
    8. Crystal Field Theory
  11. Organic Chemistry
    1. Bonding
    2. Alkanes
    3. Alkenes
    4. Alkynes
    5. Aromatic Hydrocarbons
    6. Nomenclature of Organic Molecules
    7. Organic Compounds Containing O and N

Primary Faculty
Champagne, Mark
Secondary Faculty

Associate Dean
Young, Randall
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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