Nov 26, 2021  
College Catalog 2021-2022 
    
College Catalog 2021-2022
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CHEM 1060 - Introduction to Organic Chemistry & Biochemistry

Credit Hours: 4.00


Prerequisites: CHEM 1050  with grade C or better, or equivalent

This course introduces basics of organic and biochemistry and meets the degree requirements for many health science fields. Organic chemistry topics include nomenclature, structure, and reactivity of hydrocarbons and functional groups. Biochemistry topics include structure, reactivity, and metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acid. The laboratory component complements and reinforces the topics covered in lecture. This course is strongly recommended as preparation for CHEM 2260.

Billable Contact Hours: 7

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OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the structures of alkanes, alkenes, and cycloalkenes.
  2. Name these compounds using IUPAC and common nomenclature.
  3. Describe the physical and chemical properties of alkanes, alkenes, and cycloalkenes.

Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of alcohols, ethers, and thiols.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Identify the structural features of these molecules.
  2. Name these molecules using nomenclature.
  3. Describe the physical and chemical properties of these molecules.
  4. Identify commonly-encountered alcohols.

Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of aldehydes and ketones.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Identify the structures, features, and common types of reactions of these molecules.
  2. Name these molecules using nomenclature.
  3. Describe the chemical properties and preparation of these molecules.
  4. Identify commonly-encountered aldehydes and ketones.
  5. Identify carboxylic acids, anhydrides, and esters.

Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of amines and amides.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Identify the structural features of these molecules.
  2. Name these molecules using nomenclature.
  3. Describe the chemical properties and preparation of these molecules.
  4. Describe the biological importance of amides.

Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of carbohydrates.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Describe the occurrence and function of carbohydrates.
  2. Explain the chirality of these molecules.
  3. Describe Fischer Projections.
  4. Name the properties of enantiomers.
  5. Classify monosaccharides and identify their reactions.
  6. Identify polysaccharides, glyrolipids, and glycoproteins.

Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of lipids.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Identify fatty acids, waxes, phosphoacylgycerols, steroids, fats, oils, and eicosanoids.
  2. Describe the reactions of triacylglycerols.
  3. Explain the transport of lipids across cell membranes.

Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of proteins.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Name the amino acids.
  2. Name acid=base properties.
  3. Describe peptide formation.
  4. Describe protein structure, hydrolysis, and denaturation.
  5. Identify glycoproteins and lipoproteins.

Outcome 8: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of nucleic acids and protein synthesis.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Identify the types and structures of nucleic acids.
  2. Explain nucleic acid involvement in protein synthesis and relate it to DNA recombinant technology.
  3. Explain synthesis and the role of RNA to genetic code.
  4. Describe translation and mutation of proteins.

Outcome 9: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of enzymes.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Describe the characteristics, structure, and formation of enzymes.
  2. Name enzymes using nomenclature.
  3. Identify factors that affect enzyme activity.
  4. Name medical uses of enzymes.

Outcome 10: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of specific catabolic pathways.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Describe digestion.
  2. Identify reaction end-products and energy production.
  3. Identify relationships between metabolic pathways.

Outcome 11: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate a working knowledge of bioenergetics.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Describe reactions of the electron transport chain
  2. Calculate the number of ATPs produced for each type of macromolecule

Outcome 12: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in fundamental laboratory techniques and calculations.

Objectives: During the course, students will:

  1. Identify important compounds in metabolic pathways.
  2. Describe the citric acid cycle.
  3. Describe the electron transport.
  4. Describe oxidative phosphorylation.
  5. Explain ATP production and its importance.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES (CDO)
• Communication: The graduate can communicate effectively for the intended purpose and audience.
• Critical Thinking: The graduate can make informed decisions after analyzing information or evidence related to the issue.
• Global Literacy: The graduate can analyze human behavior or experiences through cultural, social, political, or economic perspectives.
• Information Literacy: The graduate can responsibly use information gathered from a variety of formats in order to complete a task.
• Quantitative Reasoning: The graduate can apply quantitative methods or evidence to solve problems or make judgments.
• Scientific Literacy: The graduate can produce or interpret scientific information presented in a variety of formats.

CDO marked YES apply to this course:
Communication: YES
Critical Thinking: YES
Global Literacy: YES
Information Literacy: YES
Quantitative Reasoning: YES
Scientific Literacy: YES

COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE

  1. Saturated Hydrocarbons
    1. Structures of simple alkanes
    2. Formulas
    3. Isomerism
    4. IUPAC Nomenclature for alkanes
    5. Cycloalkanes
    6. Formulas of cycloalkanes
    7. IUPAC nomenclature for cycloalkanes
    8. Physical and chemical properties of alkanes and cycloalkanes
  2. Unsaturated Hydrocarbons
    1. Alkenes and cycloalkenes
    2. Physical and chemical properties of alkenes
    3. Nomenclature
    4. Isomerism
    5. Aromatic hydrocarbons
    6. Physical and chemical properties of aromatic compounds
    7. Nomenclature
  3. Alcohols, Ethers and Thiols
    1. Structural features of molecules
    2. Nomenclature
    3. Commonly encountered alcohols
    4. Chemical and physical properties
  4. Aldehydes and Ketones
    1. Structural features of molecules
    2. Nomenclature
    3. Commonly encountered aldehydes and ketones
    4. Chemical properties and preparation
    5. Common types of reactions of aldehydes and ketones
    6. Carboxylic Acids, Anhydrides, Esters
    7. Structural features of molecules
    8. Nomenclature
    9. Chemical properties and preparation
    10. Common types of reactions
  5. Amines and amides
    1. Structural features of molecules
    2. Nomenclature
    3. Chemical properties and preparation
    4. Biological importance of amides
  6. Carbohydrates
    1. Occurrence and function
    2. Chirality of molecules
    3. Fischer Projections
    4. Properties of enantiomers
    5. Monosaccharides
    6. Classification
    7. Reactions
    8. Polysaccharides, glycolipids, and glycoproteins
  7. Lipids
    1. Fatty acids
    2. Fats and oils
    3. Reactions of Triacylglycerols
    4. Phosphoacylglycerols
    5. Waxes
    6. Sphingolipids
    7. Steroids
    8. Eicosanoids
    9. Transport across cell membranes
  8. Proteins
    1. Amino acids
    2. Acid-base properties
    3. Peptide formation
    4. Protein structure: primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structure
    5. Protein hydrolysis
    6. Protein denaturation
    7. Glycoproteins
    8. Lipoproteins
  9. Nucleic Acids and Protein Synthesis
    1. Types and structure of nucleic acids
    2. DNA replication
    3. Protein synthesis
    4. Transcription
    5. Synthesis and role of RNA and the genetic code
    6. Translation and mutation of proteins
  10. Enzymes
    1. Characteristics
    2. Nomenclature
    3. Enzyme structure and function
    4. Factors that affect enzyme activity
    5. Vitamins and minerals
    6. Medical uses of enzymes
  11. Specific Catabolic Pathways: Carbohydrate, Lipid And Protein Metabolism
    1. Digestion
    2. Reaction end-products and energy production
    3. Relationships between metabolic pathways
  12. Bioenergetics: How the body converts food to energy
    1. Important compounds in metabolic pathways
    2. The citric acid cycle
    3. The electron transport chain
    4. Oxidative phosporylation
    5. ATP production and importance

Primary Faculty
Wahby, Mona
Secondary Faculty
Lograsso, Laura
Associate Dean
Young, Randall
Dean
Pritchett, Marie



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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