Dec 04, 2020  
Official Course Syllabi 2020-2021 
    
Official Course Syllabi 2020-2021
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MECT 2645 - PLC Basic Programming- Allen Bradley

Credit Hours: 4.00


Prerequisites: None

(formerly MECT 2640 and MECT 2740)

This course includes an introduction to PLC systems, basic relay logic is covered with reference to its PLC replacement, and an introduction to ladder logic programming techniques. PLC interaction with mechanical, electrical, and fluid power components and sensors. Troubleshooting of mechanical problems, circuits, logic and programs will be emphasized.

Contact Hours: 6
Billable Contact Hours: 6
OUTCOMES AND OBJECTIVES
Outcome 1: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe the mechanical and software functionality of a programmable logic controller (PLC).

Objectives:

  1. Describe the function of a PLC.
  2. Describe the functions of the six (6) basic components of a PLC.
  3. Name three (3) methods of program entry and give the advantage of each.
  4. Describe the use of ladder diagrams in PLC programs.
  5. Describe the function and operation of I/O diagrams.
  6. Describe the basic operation of PLC ladder logic.

Outcome 2: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain PLC motor control.

Objectives:

  1. Describe two (2) methods by which a PLC output can control a motor.
  2. Describe how to draw a PLC output diagram for motor application.
  3. Describe the function and operation of PLC seal-in logic.
  4. Describe the function and operation of program interlocks.
  5. Discuss the importance of PLC program documentation.

Outcome 3: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe discrete I/O interfacing.

Objectives:

  1. Describe four considerations in selecting a discrete PLC input module.
  2. Describe five considerations in selecting a discrete PLC output module.
  3. Describe how interfacing to a discrete electronic sensor is accomplished.
  4. Describe how a PLC could be interfaced to a machine controller.

Outcome 4: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to explain event sequencing utilizing a PLC.

Objectives:

  1. Define event sequencing.
  2. Describe a PLC program which controls a reciprocating actuator.
  3. Describe the function of an internal output instruction and give an application.
  4. Describe the operation of continuous cycle reciprocating program.
  5. Describe the operation of a basic multiple actuator sequence program.

Outcome 5: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe PLC timer instructions.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the function of two types of timer instructions and give an application of each.
  2. Describe the operation of a retentive timer on-delay instruction.
  3. Describe the function and application of two types of non-retentive timer instructions.
  4. Describe the operation of the non-retentive timer on-delay instruction.
  5. Describe the operation of an off-delay timer instruction.
  6. Define time driven sequencing and give three applications.

Outcome 6: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to describe PLC counter instructions.

Objectives:

  1. Describe the functions of two types of PLC counter instructions.
  2. Describe the operation of count up and count down instructions.
  3. Describe the function of the OTL, OUT, and OTU instructions and give an application.

Outcome 7: Upon completion of this course, students will be able to create a PLC program.

Objectives:

  1. Design a PLC program.
  2. Enter a PLC program using PLC software.
  3. Download a PLC processor file using PLC programming software.
  4. Edit a PLC program using PLC software.
  5. Save a PLC program using PLC software.
  6. Print a PLC program using PLC software.
  7. Document a PLC program file.

COMMON DEGREE OUTCOMES
(Bulleted outcomes apply to the course)

  • 1. The graduate can integrate the knowledge and technological skills necessary to be a successful learner.
  • 2. The graduate can demonstrate how to think competently.
  • 3. The graduate can demonstrate how to employ mathematical knowledge.
  • 4. The graduate can demonstrate how to communicate competenty.
  1. The graduate is sensitive to issues relating to a diverse, global society.

COURSE CONTENT OUTLINE
  1. Introduction to Programmable Controllers
    1. PLC function and applications
    2. Advantages of PLCs
    3. Functions of the six basic components that make up a PLC
    4. Methods and advantages of entering PLC programs
    5. Basic operation of a PLC
    6. Ladder logic and ladder diagrams
    7. Discrete addresses
    8. I/O diagrams
    9. XIC, XIO, and OTE instructions
    10. PLC processor files
    11. PLC programming software
  2. Basic PLC Programming
    1. Numbering systems
    2. Memory organization
    3. I/O data tables
    4. Input devices and I/O logic
    5. Multiple output control
    6. Configuring I/O
    7. Entering basic programs
    8. Saving and editing basic programs
    9. Printing out reports
  3. PLC Motor Control
    1. Controlling motors with outputs
    2. Output diagrams for motor applications
    3. Controlling inputs with outputs
    4. Seal-in logic
    5. Interlocks
    6. Motor control safety
    7. Program documentation
    8. Jog control
    9. StartStop programs
    10. Safety interlocks and machine control
  4. Discrete I/O Interfacing
    1. Selecting the proper I/O module
    2. output modules
    3. Interfacing sensors and sensor modules
    4. Interfacing to machine controllers
    5. Testing discrete I/O devices
    6. Interface wiring
  5. Event Sequencing
    1. Event driven sequencing
    2. Reciprocating actuator PLC program
    3. Internal output instructions
    4. Continuous cycle reciprocating program
    5. Sequencing multiple actuators
    6. Program design examples
  6. PLC Application Development
    1. The seven steps used to design a PLC program
    2. PLC programs with manual and automatic modes
    3. Methods of stopping a PLC controlled machine
    4. PLC programs which have both Halt and Cycle Stop functions
  7. PLC Timer Instructions
    1. Types of timer instructions
    2. Retentive and Non-retentive timer instructions
    3. On Delay and Off Delay instructions
    4. Time driven sequencing
    5. Program design examples
  8. PLC Counter Instructions
    1. Count Up and Count Down instructions
    2. OTL, OUT, and OUT instructions
    3. Controlling the number of production cycles
    4. Program design examples

Primary Faculty
Mielke, Michael
Secondary Faculty
Dulinski, Kenneth
Associate Dean
Hinrichsen, Timothy
Dean
Hutchison, Donald



Official Course Syllabus - Macomb Community College, 14500 E 12 Mile Road, Warren, MI 48088



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